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State

  • Atomic City Update: Cutting UNM sports hurts the athletes more than anyone
    Over the past week, I have spent a lot of time thinking about the recent sports cuts at University of New Mexico, trying to think about it from the perspective of the students. For months, we have heard from coaches and parents about what these cuts will do to them, and we have listened to the administration explain their reasoning for making these decisions.  But, somehow, I think we have forgotten about the people that this will affect more than anyone: the student-athletes. More so than anyone else, this represents a major life event, one that none of them saw coming. In less than a year, the program they have dedicated their lives to will no longer exist. Sure, some of them will be able to transfer schools and pick up where they left off. But that will not be an option for everyone.  Sure, UNM has promised to honor the scholarships of the student-athletes who lose their sports, but that will be a small consolation prize. I have tried to put myself in the shoes of a men’s soccer player, skier or beach volleyball player at UNM, and when I thought about it from that perspective, it’s scary. 
  • Atomic City Update: Decision to cut sports nothing but a quick fix for UNM
    When news came down Thursday afternoon that the University of New Mexico was officially eliminating men’s soccer, beach volleyball and both skiing teams, I had a feeling of disbelief and shock.  Now, the news itself didn’t shock me. This has been the expected move for a few months now, ever since the idea of eliminating sports was brought up in April. But for some reason, I always thought the school would eventually see how illogical and unfair the move is.  By cutting skiing and soccer, the university is letting go of two of its most successful national sports, teams that compete for championships every year and are highly respected. Based on money alone, sure, these moves will help the university. But that seems to be a short sighted and narrow-minded view of things. In my opinion, this move gives UNM a black eye, and will set it back immensely in every sport. 
  • Atomic City Update: Decision to cut sports nothing but a quick fix for UNM
    When news came down Thursday afternoon that the University of New Mexico was officially eliminating men’s soccer, beach volleyball and both skiing teams, I had a feeling of disbelief and shock.  Now, the news itself didn’t shock me. This has been the expected move for a few months now, ever since the idea of eliminating sports was brought up in April. But for some reason, I always thought the school would eventually see how illogical and unfair the move is.  By cutting skiing and soccer, the university is letting go of two of its most successful national sports, teams that compete for championships every year and are highly respected. Based on money alone, sure, these moves will help the university. But that seems to be a short sighted and narrow-minded view of things. In my opinion, this move gives UNM a black eye, and will set it back immensely in every sport. 
  • Atomic City Update: Decision to cut sports nothing but a quick fix for UNM
    When news came down Thursday afternoon that the University of New Mexico was officially eliminating men’s soccer, beach volleyball and both skiing teams, I had a feeling of disbelief and shock.  Now, the news itself didn’t shock me. This has been the expected move for a few months now, ever since the idea of eliminating sports was brought up in April. But for some reason, I always thought the school would eventually see how illogical and unfair the move is.  By cutting skiing and soccer, the university is letting go of two of its most successful national sports, teams that compete for championships every year and are highly respected. Based on money alone, sure, these moves will help the university. But that seems to be a short sighted and narrow-minded view of things. In my opinion, this move gives UNM a black eye, and will set it back immensely in every sport. 
  • Atomic City Update: Decision to cut sports nothing but a quick fix for UNM
    When news came down Thursday afternoon that the University of New Mexico was officially eliminating men’s soccer, beach volleyball and both skiing teams, I had a feeling of disbelief and shock.  Now, the news itself didn’t shock me. This has been the expected move for a few months now, ever since the idea of eliminating sports was brought up in April. But for some reason, I always thought the school would eventually see how illogical and unfair the move is.  By cutting skiing and soccer, the university is letting go of two of its most successful national sports, teams that compete for championships every year and are highly respected. Based on money alone, sure, these moves will help the university. But that seems to be a short sighted and narrow-minded view of things. In my opinion, this move gives UNM a black eye, and will set it back immensely in every sport. 
  • Atomic City Update: Decision to cut sports nothing but a quick fix for UNM
    When news came down Thursday afternoon that the University of New Mexico was officially eliminating men’s soccer, beach volleyball and both skiing teams, I had a feeling of disbelief and shock.  Now, the news itself didn’t shock me. This has been the expected move for a few months now, ever since the idea of eliminating sports was brought up in April. But for some reason, I always thought the school would eventually see how illogical and unfair the move is.  By cutting skiing and soccer, the university is letting go of two of its most successful national sports, teams that compete for championships every year and are highly respected. Based on money alone, sure, these moves will help the university. But that seems to be a short sighted and narrow-minded view of things. In my opinion, this move gives UNM a black eye, and will set it back immensely in every sport. 
  • UNM regents approve cutting four sports
    The Board of Regents at New Mexico's flagship university voted Thursday to eliminate four sports teams and make other changes to its troubled athletic department to address persistent budget problems and failures to meet federal gender equity requirements under Title IX. University President Garnett S. Stokes and athletic director Eddie Nunez presented recommendations to cut men's soccer, along with the men's and women's skiing and beach volleyball programs, during a special meeting. This decision will have an impact locally on the Southwest Nordic Ski Club, which has had a relationship with the Lobo ski team since the 1980s. As the longest running Nordic ski club in the state, the Los Alamos-based group has worked closely with the athletes from UNM in the past, and the two groups have combined to run programs in the state.
  • Atomic City Update: Title IX violations a bad start to an important summer for UNM
    More than any year before, this summer will determine the future of University of New Mexico athletics, for better or worse. Due to a mountain of debt accumulated under the previous school and athletic administrations, drastic measures will be taken, including the elimination of one or more sports, to be announced July 1 or earlier.  The first step in that process was a Title IX assessment of the school’s athletic department, released last week. The assessment showed a variety of serious problems that need to be addressed, something that won’t be easy at all with the financial troubles facing the school. Among the top problems are the disparity between athletic opportunities for men and women and the difference in locker rooms and training facilities between men and women’s sports.  To me, the most disturbing thing to come out of the Title IX assessment was the description of how the softball locker room differs from the baseball locker room, as well as the conditions that the volleyball teams are forced to endure. 
  • Former LAHS baseball star named Freshman All-American at UNM
    Connor Mang of Los Alamos was certainly the brightest of bright spots among UNM baseball’s freshman class. This week, he was officially recognized as such, as Collegiate Baseball named Mang to its Freshman All-America team. He is UNM’s 10th Freshman All-American since the 2008 season, and the fifth since 2015.  He is the first UNM Collegiate Baseball All-American as a first baseman since D.J. Peterson in 2011. Overall, Mang hit .326 over 48 games with 10 doubles, three triples, two homers and 27 RBI.  His batting average was second on the team, and he was tied for third in doubles and RBI.  He had 15 multi-hit games including eight three-hit games and he ended the season with an 11-game on-base streak. Mang opened the season as UNM’s third baseman before moving to second.  He moved to first base during the fifth weekend of the season and made himself a home there, solidifying UNM’s defense and giving the Lobos some corner pop with his bat.  Despite having not previously played the position, he committed just one error all season at first.
  • New pro soccer team coming to N.M.
     ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The United Soccer League, the second-highest professional soccer level in America behind Major League Soccer, announced it will bring a team to Albuquerque. USL Commissioner Jake Edwards and USL New Mexico President and Owner Peter Trevisani said Wednesday that the team will begin play in March. Public input will establish the formal club name.