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Opinion

  • It seems that every time a national report comes out, New Mexico seems to be near the bottom of it.

    Well, it has happened again.

    According to an annual Kids Count report, our state ranks 48th in the nation for child well-being with poor showings in its teen pregnancy and child death rate, as well as the number of high school dropouts and youths living in poverty.

    And once again, the only places worse than us are Louisiana and Mississippi.

    New Hampshire ranked No. 1 for child well-being.

  • Many people like to spend much of their time working overtime to find anything – and everything – that is wrong with America.

    And while there are issues and concerns we as a people and nation have and must deal with, a very solid case can be made that this is truly the best place there is to live.

    When we have troubles – be it with the government, our leaders or our laws – we deal with them. We don’t bury our heads and pretend those problems don’t exist.

  • It was good to see that the county utilities department understands that our electric grid needs work. We only hope that things move along quickly.

    As anyone who has lived here for any length of time knows, the power goes off way too often. And it is more than just an inconvenience.

    At a public meeting this week at Fuller Lodge, John Arrowsmith, the new utilities director, and Steve Cummins, the deputy utilities manager, told the audience that over the next four years, the county will be fitted for a new electrical backbone.

  • The proposals coming from the House Appropriators Committee were a mixed bag and a bit hard to understand.

    While adding millions to energy and water work, it cut out work on the lab’s Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement facility. This is hard to understand.

    You can argue that we don’t need a huge new stockpile of nuclear weapons, that is fine. But to say we need no work, no production, no research seems foolish to us.

  • We must take a moment to pause and give the lab some due when it is deserved. And it earned some big points Wednesday when it hosted the quarterly Community Leaders Breakfast.

    It is easy to point out when the lab fails or when it falls short. But if that is so, then the opposite should also be true.

    And it is so here as LANL Director Michael Anastasio should be given credit for opening the lab’s doors – if even just a little.

  • Dr. James Anderson stepped out of his office at 751 Trinity Drive today and into retirement. As superintendent of Los Alamos Public Schools for 14 years, he leaves behind a proud legacy.

    Sen. Pete Domenici recognized this, saying, “Although the school district will certainly miss his leadership, I believe he is leaving a solid foundation for even greater educational growth and development for students and the entire community.”

  • Saturday was Flag Day, the day we pay an official tribute to the American flag, the ideals it stands for and the sacrifices made to preserve them.

    While we should honor the flag every day, an extra day is a good time to remember the symbol that stands for what we believe in: freedom.

    President Woodrow Wilson recognized during his first Flag Day address in 1915 that the freedoms the U.S. flag stands for were not and never would be free.

    And American blood has been spilled time and time again to preserve our liberties.

  • The school board approved a measure that asks residents to back a bond resolution to help repair and rebuild our schools.

    This is a measure – and effort – that we should support.

    Our schools are old and in need of repair – and in some cases outright replacement. The board recognizes this fact and its members are taking the right steps to move us forward.

    Yes, this will be a tax increase; there is no way of getting around that. And yes, these are difficult times in Los Alamos right now.

  • A recent ruling by the Attorney General’s Office should be of concern to everyone.

    See, the office ruled that state law contains no recourse for people who ask to inspect state officials’ public e-mails and find they’ve been deleted.

    So if an official wants to hide something, just do it via the Internet than delete it.

    It is scary. Any document produced by a public figure doing the public’s business belongs to the public. To just hit the delete key to avoid disclosure is not acceptable.

  • We can understand the concern of the Bernalillo County Clerk that she would run out of ballots on election day.

    But please, how much is clearly too much?

    See, Bernalillo County shredded almost 1.4 million ballots – which cost taxpayers about $1.2 million – that were left over from Tuesday’s primary election.

    County Clerk Maggie Toulouse Oliver says her office wanted to avoid a debacle of not having enough ballots.

    Well and good, she should make sure she had enough. But how many voters does she think live in Bernalillo County?

  • Officials are boasting of a high primary election turnout. Statewide that translates to a whopping 28 percent.

    Yes, 28 percent of registered voters actually going and casting a vote is something to brag about.

    And this is of registered voters – many citizens don’t even bother to register.

    A total of 543,615 Democrats and 354,272 Republicans were registered to vote in Tuesday’s primary election. Of that, about 138,000 Democrats voted, while some 111,000 Republicans went to the polls.

  • First, Hill Restaurant was honored by the state’s restaurant association. That recognition is well deserved and appreciated by anyone who goes there to eat.

    The service is always pleasant and prompt.

    Now, the Hilltop House’s staff was recognized by the Best Western Corp. for having an employee who goes above and beyond.

    Again, anyone who has stopped by has always been greeted warmly – both in the hotel and the restaurant.

    These are just two examples of the outstanding businesses we have here.

  • While voting has been going on for some time, Tuesday is the big day when polling places will be open and tallies made.

    If you have not voted, be sure that you do so at your place of registration (see Sunday’s paper for a complete list.)

    Voting is one of the key elements of a democracy, be sure that you take part.

    Registered voters can begin casting ballots on primary election day from 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

    As a recap, here are the Monitor’s recommendations in this primary election; only commenting on contested races..

  • Monday is Memorial Day. It is so much more than a day off from work to picnic with the family and kick-off the summer season. It carries even greater meaning during a time of war like we are experiencing right now.

    Over the past months a sizable number of American soldiers have died in service to their country. Memorial Day is a special day set aside for all of us to remember and memorialize the soldiers of many generations who have given their lives so that we are free to enjoy our picnics and trips to the amusement parks.

    These men and women must be remembered.

  • Last week, the county council met to discuss plans and proposals for White Rock.

    While that community needs assistance, care must be taken on just what is spent there. If the county thinks that just building buildings will bring in business, it does not understand economics.

    However, there is a word for us all to consider here, and it could really be the key to the White Rock discussion.

    And that word is Bandelier.

  • What ever happened to the will of the people?

    When did that go away?

    Well, it seems to have for New Mexico’s Democratic leaders as more and more of the state’s Democratic superdelegates are announcing support for Barack Obama’s presidential bid.

    Last time we looked, Hillary Clinton won the vote in the primary held here. What happened to that? How can the vote of the people be ignored so easily?

  • The Monitor will continue its tradition of recommendations in election races, this year making some suggestions for the primary – in which early voting has already begun.

    The Monitor editorial board was not unanimous in its recommendations, and that will be noted when pertinent. And we will not comment on uncontested races.

  • The Monitor will continue its tradition of recommendations in election races, this year making some suggestions for the primary – in which early voting has already begun.

    The Monitor editorial board was not unanimous in its recommendations, and that will be noted when pertinent. And we will not comment on uncontested races.

    In the race for the U.S. House seat in the Third District, the board was divided between Don Wiviott and Harry Montoya in the Democratic primary.

  • The cleanup of the land in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory must not be something that eventually gets done.

    It must be a priority.

    And this must start with our delegation in Washington and with the Department of Energy.

    Because of funding issues there is a danger that the agreement between the state and the DOE on a timetable to do the cleanup will not be met. We have to agree with NMED Secretary Ron Curry that that is unacceptable.

  • The Associated Press recently released a report on campaign spending in the Third District.

    And the winner was Santa Fe developer Don Wiviott, who spent more than a  half-million dollars in three months on his quest for the 3rd District seat in Congress.

    And, according to a report filed Tuesday with the Federal Election Commission, he still had more than $400,000 in the bank as of the end of March.