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Features

  • Audubon New Mexico announced March 1 the appointment of Paul Tashjian as Associate Director of Freshwater Conservation.

    Tashjian will further bolster Audubon New Mexico’s innovative freshwater conservation program to address the many challenges the state is facing regarding significant declining river flows, and the impact it has on birds, wildlife and New Mexicans.

    Tashjian, a longtime resident of New Mexico, will lead Audubon New Mexico’s multi-faceted Freshwater Conservation Program along with Beth Bardwell, Director of Conservation effective March 5, 2018. He will direct efforts to develop and implement policy, market-based, restoration and strategic engagement strategies to protect and restore natural ecosystems for communities, birds and other wildlife on New Mexico’s major rivers and tributaries, with a focus on the Rio Grande and Colorado River Basins.

    “I’m very excited to be working with Audubon New Mexico on water and wildlife conservation issues, said Paul Tashjian. “I love our State’s rivers and wetlands and have spent much of my time stomping around these magical places.”

  • Santa Fe Pens is hosting the 23rd Annual Santa Fe Pen Fair from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and from noon-5 p.m. Sunday at the store located at DeVargas Center, 179 A, Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe.

    Following a 20-year run at the now-closed Sanbusco location, Santa Fe Pens, as part of the event, will unveil its Santa Fe Edition XX fountain and roller ball pens.

    “This year, we’re bringing back our free calligraphy seminars for children (age 8 and up) and adults. Our newest employee, Shawn Hayden, will teach basic calligraphy lettering techniques at 1:30 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday,” said Neal Frank, Santa Fe Pens owner.

  • BY JAMES ROBINSON
    Special to the Monitor

    We here in Los Alamos are so lucky to live in a town that has such a close connection to the amazing abundance of wildlife New Mexico has to offer. One of the greatest opportunities I have had is to be a champion and advocate for the amazing wildlife rehabilitators here in New Mexico.

    I have done this as both a volunteer and chairman of Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation. These individuals, like Los Alamos’s own Dr. Kathleen Ramsay, have dedicated their lives to caring for the wildlife of New Mexico.

    There is one story that is special to my heart. Blue Beary was the first bear I accepted by myself, and she holds a special place in my heart! Blue Beary came into Ramsay’s care a mere 6 pounds, and with as badly broken arm.

    Partnering with Veterinary Care Hospital in Albuquerque and donations from all over the country (including many from Los Alamos), Ramsay was able to give Blue Beary what she needed to heal and to grow to over 65 pounds.

    Blue Beary was released back into wild late 2017, where we hope she found a cozy den for the winter. If successful, she will come out of the den around May and begin the journey all bears must make. The journey to become fat.

  • The Los Alamos County Community Services Department wrapped up their collaborative 100 Days of Winter program on Feb. 26.

    Over 1,000 programming guides were distributed throughout Los Alamos County between November and February, encouraging residents and visitors to get out and active during the winter months.

    With just under 200 online participants, and over 260 entries for the grand prize, many shared photos of the wide variety of ways they were inspired to stay local and enjoy all the Los Alamos area has to offer.

    Congratulations to our grand prize winner Danna Pelland! Danna won a package of local goodies worth over $950.

  • Thomas Romero, executive director of the Northern Rio Grande National Heritage Area, will give a presentation on the work of the Heritage Area, which covers the area of Taos, Rio Arriba and Santa Fe counties, at 7 p.m. March 13 at Fuller Lodge.

    Romero’s lecture, “Northern Rio Grande National Heritage Area: Sustaining Culture and Traditions,” will focus on the work of the organization over the last four years in creating sustaining partnerships with other cultural organizations. 

    He will discuss the Heritage Area’s grants program and project efforts to support education, community development, tourism and economic development, and the preservation of northern New Mexico’s cultural heritage. 

    As a sustaining organization, the National Heritage Area brings federal funding into the state, but it is through its collaborative partnerships that the Heritage Area intends to influence the preservation of culture and traditions.

    Romero has been the executive director of the National Heritage Area Organization since August 2011.                                          

  • Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation has announced that Liz Martineau is the new Creative District Curator, effective at the end of February.

    Martineau has worked for the Los Alamos Public Schools, the Bradbury Science Museum and has either taught or volunteered at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, History Museum and Nature Center. She serves on the board for Los Alamos Makers and is part of the community effort to open Polaris Charter School in Los Alamos.

    “Los Alamos is a vibrant community devoted to art, science, history, and nature, and I am excited to bring these together to provide new opportunities and to enrich our downtown.” Martineau said.\

    The Los Alamos Creative District provides programs, including the “On Tap” lecture and libations series and “Tuesdays at the Pond” summer entertainment series.

  • Join the Los Alamos History Museum for History on Tap Monday to learn about the FERMIAC.

    History on Tap, part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District, is 5:30 p.m. Monday at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society for an engaging discussion over food and drinks with Dr. Todd Urbatsch about the FERMIAC. Urbatsch will be demonstrating LANL’s museum-quality replica of this analog computer. Enrico Fermi and L.D.P. King created the FERMIAC in 1947 to study the paths of neutrons using the Monte Carlo method.

    More information about History on Tap and other Historical Society programs and events can be found at losalamoshistory.org and by following the Los Alamos History Museum on Facebook.

  • Registration is now open for Little League Baseball and Softball.

    Sign-ups will run through March 9.

    Early registration is encouraged to make sure enough uniforms and equipment are ordered for the upcoming season.
    To register, visit lalittleleague.org.

    The cost of registration is $75 for the season with a $10 discount for additional siblings. Continuing with a very successful program in 2017, any child who will play in the little league for the first time will be admitted to the league for free, to encourage participation in baseball and softball.

    Need-based scholarships are also available. More information can be found on the Los Alamos County Little League website.

    All ages and levels of play are welcome.

    T-ball teams are co-ed and all girls, ages 4-7. Minor leagues are ages 7-11. Major Leagues are ages 9-12. Girl’s softball teams are up to age 16.

    Baseball try-outs will be March 17, March 21 and (tentatively) March 22.

    The season start dates are: April 28 for opening season; practices start the week after Spring Break; games start the second or third week of April (weather dependent).

  • ALBUQUERQUE — Visitors to the Land of Enchantment can  experience the grandeur of Chaco Canyon National Historical Park in luxury and style, when guided day and overnight glamping trips from Albuquerque’s Hotel Chaco resume for a new season on March 3.

    Hotel Chaco, a boutique property inspired by the ancient architecture and civilization of Chaco Canyon, launched the tours in 2017 with partner Heritage Inspirations, LLC.

    The excursions were so popular that an expanded schedule will be offered this year, with day trips every Saturday in March through November, and overnight glamping excursions coinciding with the spring and fall equinoxes. (March 19-20 and Sept. 22-23) Custom, private day or overnight trips on other dates are also available.

    Located in northwestern New Mexico, Chaco Canyon National Monument, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, was home to a thriving Pueblo culture between 850–1250 AD. What remains of the timber and sandstone buildings – designed to align with the movement of the sun, moon and stars – makes for fascinating exploration, all in a setting of natural desert beauty.

  • The March Brown Bag lunch March 7 at Fuller Lodge will feature two pianists from Taos, Kim Bakkum and Claire Detels, who will perform music by Romantic-era composers, Clara Schumann (1819-1896), Cécile Chaminade (1857-1944) and Florence Price (1887-1953).

    Some of the music will be played “four-hands,” two players on one piano.

    These lovely compositions were not well received at the time, simply because women composers were not acknowledged. But times have changed!

    Hopefully, this concert will inspire the audience members to research more music written by accomplished women.

    Bakkum and Detels are professional pianists who have established an international performing careers. Now residents of Taos, they are performing inspirational concerts around New Mexico, and maintaining private teaching studios.

    Los Alamos Arts Council has presented the free Brown Bag performances once each month at noon to enthusiastic audiences, who enjoy the warm acoustics and atmosphere of Fuller Lodge, almost every month since 1973. Join in supporting talented performers by spending your lunch period every first Wednesday of the month at the Lodge.
    Visit LosAlamosArtsCouncil.org or call 663-0477 for more information.

  • Join the Los Alamos History Museum for History on Tap Tuesday to learn about the FERMIAC.

    History on Tap, part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District, is 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society for an engaging discussion over food and drinks with Dr. Todd Urbatsch about the FERMIAC.

    Urbatsch will demonstrate LANL’s museum-quality replica of this analog computer. Enrico Fermi and L.D.P. King created the FERMIAC in 1947 to study the paths of neutrons using the Monte Carlo method.

    More information about History on Tap and other Historical Society programs and events can be found at losalamoshistory.org and by following the Los Alamos History Museum on Facebook.

    History On Tap is sponsored by the Los Alamos Creative District and hosted by the Los Alamos History Museum. The On Tap series begins each evening with an informal 10-15 minute lecture followed by a lively group discussion.

  • Some people might find it a little unnerving to be hit with a government inspection of their operations a handful of days after stepping into the role of the director of those operations.

    That wasn’t the case for Linda Bullock, who started as the executive director for Sombrillo Nursing and Rehab Center and Aspen Ridge Lodge in early January, about a week before the state came in to conduct its annual survey of the facilities.

    “I started on Jan. 8 and they walked in about a week later,” she said. “We weren’t due for our survey until the latter part of April through July, but they came early because a lot of the facilities in New Mexico were sick with the flu and we weren’t.”

    For Bullock, who for over 25 years has worked in the field of elder health care, the early survey simply meant hitting the ground running at a quicker pace than the already fast past she had started.

    “First we’re clearing the minor things that were identified by the state survey,” she said. “That’s my primary objective right now, just managing the survey process. We have a few minor improvements that were identified that we need to work on to make things better. So I’m working on those things.”

    That’s just the start of her list.

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    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board. 

     

    Friday, February 23, 2018

    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live

    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 2-13-18

    1:00 PM Democracy Now!

    4:00 PM Uprising

    5:00 PM Democracy Now!

    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Harry Burgess

    7:00 PM Los Alamos History – A History of Land Transfers on the Pajarito Plateau

    8:00 PM Art Fusion – Live Radio Show with Dr. Hall & Brad Smith

    8:30 PM The LA Times with Peter Malmgren

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    SANTA FE (AP) — The nonprofit behind the nearly century-old Santa Fe Indian Market has appointed a new executive director.

    A spokeswoman for the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts says Ira Wilson will take the helm of the organization, replacing Dallin Maybee.

    Maybee, an artist and attorney, announced recently that he was stepping down from the position.

    The annual Santa Fe Indian Market in August has been touted as one of the nation’s most prestigious art markets.

    Each August, it draws about 1,000 jewelers, potters and other artists, as well as roughly 150,000 people, to downtown Santa Fe.

    The juried art market on the city plaza lasts two days.

    Wilson, who is Navajo, joins the organization after 26 years with the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque.

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    ALBUQUERQUE — For years, Zavier Thompson has followed of Marvel superhero movies. But the 16-year-old student in Albuquerque has always wanted to see a popular film with a black superhero and black themes.

    Thanks to an Albuquerque educator, the aspiring hip-hop and spoken word artist finally got his wish Thursday when he was given tickets to a private screening of “Black Panther.”

    “It was amazing. The music, the action...everything,” said Thompson, who is black. “It made me proud to see out culture depicted like that.”

    “Black Panther” is about the mythical and highly advanced African nation of Wakanda, where T’Challa, played by Chadwick Boseman, inherits the throne but is challenged by a Wakandan exile named Killmonger, played by Michael B. Jordan.  It’s the 18th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and based on 50-year-old material created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

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    LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II has always dressed with style and flair – but Tuesday marked her first visit to the showy catwalks of London Fashion Week.

    The monarch squeezed in the front row, chatting with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour — who wore her trademark sunglasses — and presented an award recognizing British design excellence.

    It was an unusual outing for the 91-year-old monarch, who seemed totally at ease at the type of event usually frequented by stars like Kate Moss and Sienna Miller. She was elegant in a Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny aquamarine Swarovski crystals set off by formal black gloves.

    Elizabeth carried a matching handbag – of course – and wore her mostly white hair swept back. The queen didn’t bother with the statement stiletto heels favored by many of the younger fashionistas, opting for sensible dark low-heeled court shoes for the awards presentation.

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    NEW YORK — A lavish, headline-grabbing premiere. Lightning word-of-mouth stoked by glowing reviews. Packed movie theaters with sold-out shows, long lines and fans decked out as characters from the film.

    The phenomenon of “Black Panther” had the look and feel of a classic, bona fide blockbuster in route to its record-setting $201.8 million debut over the weekend, or an estimated $235 million Friday through Monday. Much has been made about the film industry’s struggles to tap into pop culture the way it once more regularly did – that TV and streaming options and a dearth of fresh ideas have diminished the power of the big screen.

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    New drugs are under constant development but most fail in clinical trials. Why do so many drugs pass animal testing, but fail in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans? Are animal models of human diseases ultimately really a good model for humans?

    Enter ATHENA. ATHENA, which stands for Advanced Tissue-engineered Human External Network Analyzer, is designed to simulate organ systems – such as liver, heart, lung, and kidney – and can be used as a first-line test for potential toxicity analysis since the system can mimic the response of actual human organs. Such research could lead to faster approval and fewer potential side effects for new medications coming onto the market.

    Join Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this important field. Science On Tap is today 1 beginning at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Bring your Bradbury Science Museum Association membership card (or join on the spot – at very reasonable rates) and get $1 off your food and/or drink at Science On Tap.

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    The Los Alamos County Library System will present the celebrated acoustic duo Hungrytown at 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave. 

     

    Last July, they returned from a successful six-and-a-half-month tour of the US, UK and New Zealand, covering over 16,000 miles in the U.S. 

    Hungrytown is currently on a four-month tour of the American south and southwest.

    Vermonters Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson, who make up Hungrytown, have been touring professionally for nearly 15 years. 

    Hungrytown’s songs and music have appeared in numerous television programs, including IFC’s “Portlandia,” Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and Neftlix’s new comedy, Lady Dynamite,” as well as various documentaries and major sporting events ranging from NASCAR to Hockey Night in Canada.

    Their third and latest album, “Further West,” made the top 10 on the American Folk DJ charts for two months, and at least 14 “Best of the year” lists.