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Features

  • New Mexico’s original food festival, the Pork & Brew, will return to the Santa Ana Star Center in Albuquerque for the 15th year this weekend from Friday to Sunday.

    This year’s event will make it easier and more convenient to get to and from the Star Center. For the first time ever Pork & Brew will be offering discount rides to patrons through UBER.

    All patrons have to do is enter their discount code going to or from the event to receive the discount. There will be three different discount codes to correspond with the three days of the event. The codes are PORKBREW29 for Friday, PORKBREW30 for Saturday, and PORKBREW1 for Sunday. Visit the UBER app on smartphones and enter the assigned code to save $10.

    This year’s 15th Annual Pork & Brew, presented by Visit Rio Rancho and hosted by the Santa Ana Star Center, will feature an indoor and outdoor format, ensuring attendees a venue to enjoy the festival in rain or shine.

    This year’s event will again feature some of New Mexico’s breweries with the likes of Tractor Brewing Company, Red Door Brewing Company and local Rio Rancho favorite Cazuela’s Brewery.

  • The Santa Fe Symphony will kick off its 35th anniversary season with a powerful double-violin performance featuring Sirena Huang, winner of the 2017 Elmar Oliveira International Violin Competition, who is joined by none other than renowned violinist Elmar Oliveira himself for Bach’s Double Violin Concerto.

    The performance is set for 4 p.m. Sept. 16 at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe.

    Praised by The Baltimore Sun for her impeccable technique, deeply expressive phrasing, and poetic weight, Huang, 2009 First Prize Gold Medalist of the sixth International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young Musicians, is one of her generation’s most celebrated violinists.

    Oliveira, the first and only American violinist to win the Gold Medal at Moscow’s prestigious Tchaikovsky International Competition, and the first violinist to ever receive the coveted Avery Fisher Prize, brings a style that remarkably combines impeccable artistry and old-world elegance. Together they make a stunning performance of Bach’s famous late Baroque work, Double Violin Concerto in D Minor conducted by Maestro Guillermo Figueroa, as he leads the symphony in his second full season as principal conductor.

  • It’s coming up on that time of year again, when artists from all over the world will descend on Museum Hill in Santa Fe for the annual International Folk Art Festival.

    This year promises to be the biggest festival yet. Set for July 13-15, 150 artists from all over the world are scheduled to participate. Visitors who pay the $15 to $20 admission will have access to the artists who will sell many items, including jewelry, rugs, fiber art, pottery, sculpture, paintings and clothing.

    Tickets are also available for $150 for Thursday night’s One World Awards Dinner at the Lumpkins Ball Room at La Fonda on the Plaza at 7 p.m.  Ticket holders will be able to socialize with the participating artists and Nobel Prize winner Dr.

    Muhammad Yunus, chairman of the festival this year. The evening will feature awards for those who’ve made the festival and its mission of supporting artists from all over the world a success and an opera performance from Monica Yunus.

    Festivalgoers can also purchase tickets to the actual festival at the site.

    For festival visitors, Saturday and Sunday admission is reasonable. Tickets are $20 for Saturday and $15 Sunday. Children under 16 are free Saturday and Sunday. 

  • Registration is now open for this year’s Los Alamos Fair and Rodeo Parade set to march up Central Avenue Aug. 11, beginning at 10 a.m.

    Don’t miss this opportunity to promote a business or organization by participating in the parade. Registration is free and now open via the MainStreet website at LosAlamosMainStreet.com or directly via Eventbrite.

    Participants must register by Aug. 3.

    The theme of this year’s Los Alamos Fair and Rodeo weekend is “Back To Your Roots.” 

    Judges located on Central Avenue and MainStreet will assess entries based on originality and interpretation of theme.

    For the full schedule of the other fair and rodeo events, led by the county, visit the county’s recreation page. Details are also posted on the Los Alamos MainStreet website.  

    For more information on the parade, contact Los Alamos MainStreet at 661-4844.

    For the rodeo, vendors and music, contact the Los Alamos County Recreation Division at 662-8170. For exhibits, reach the Cooperative Extension Office at 662-2656, and for the Arts & Crafts Fair, contact the Fuller Lodge Art Center at 662-1635.

  • The Los Alamos County Library System is accepting applications for members. The purpose of the board is to:

    •Receive input from the public and based on that input, make recommendations to council that support the fulfillment of the library’s mission in the community

    • Provide information and advice on items requested by the council, and review and recommend public policies.

    • Gather and provide public input on the development of library service objectives and the library’s long range plan.

    Board members serve for two years. Meetings are held on the first Monday of each month from 5:30–7 p.m.

    Only on-line applications will be considered. For more information on how to apply, go to the county’s website at losalamosnm.us/government/boards___commissions.

  • My column this week is only for people over 30. I thought about saying 40, but realized there are some planners that look ahead, so why not include them.

    Sometimes, I think we expect more from our youth than we expect out of ourselves. We tell them they need to ask for help and reach out to others when adults don’t necessarily model it.

    I see many ways that parents, caregivers and adults can show youth good strategies, on their path to adulthood. They are easy, simple things, I think we often overlook but could create a pattern for negative habits.

    When you can stop and look ahead, as well as back at the same time, you notice how small decisions can make a big difference.

    Let’s start with the aging process. It is imperative that as we age, we continue to seek medical advice. We start with great habits with newborns and babies. We go to planned appointments, talk about successes and setbacks, get advice and continue the path.

    It is important to continue that into adulthood and not feel offended when suggestions are discussed about improving our health. When something hurts for too long, go to the doctor, find out what is wrong and don’t let it spiral into a bad situation.

  • Behaviorology, a science that’s been around for 100 years, is only now beginning to gain traction in the popular mainstream.

    “Behaviorology is the natural science extension of biology that addresses why human behavior happens; it is a natural science to help build a sustainable society in a timely manner,” Los Alamos resident and author Stephen Ledoux said.

    Ledoux will explain more about the science and his new book at an appearance at the Mesa Public Library at 7 p.m. as part of the library’s book discussion series, Authors Speak.

    Ledoux said there are many reasons why behaviorology has flown under the popular radar all these years. While researchers, scientists and engineers have incorporated certain parts of the science into their own disciplines, there are very few books that look at the science as a whole.

    No one need be intimidated, he said as his book does away with technical jargon and explains in plain English the principles behind the science.

    Ledoux said his book is for people who want to know more about behaviorology, and how it helps with real world problems, and how it can personally help individuals.

    What it isn’t, he said, is a self-help book or something that pushes the latest trends in pop psychology.

  • RATS! About four of them actually. On June 1, the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter received three male rats and one female rat, each with their own particular traits.

    Tinky, the female rat, is the smallest of the bunch. Animal shelter staff describe her as a outgoing and social. She isn’t spayed though, because staff couldn’t find a vet in the area that can spay a rat.

    Templeton loves snacks and attention. Templeton has been neutered and is ready to go to his forever home.

    Templeton’s brother, Gary, is a burrower who prefers plenty of soft bedding to get down into.

    He likes to be held, and has also been neutered. Gilbert is the largest of the bunch, and he also likes to be held and is very adventurous.

    All of the rats are from one litter. They are from a surrender, and they were all born April 27.

    They are clean and have received an excellent bill of health. Each can be adopted for $25.

    For more information, call the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179 or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • The Voices of Los Alamos will meet from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Monday at the Unitarian Church in Los Alamos.

    The group will discuss upcoming rallies to protest President Donald Trump’s administration’s policy of separating families at the border. All citizens interested in participating and/or organizing an event are invited.

    The group will also host speakers Mary Feldblum, executive director of the Campaign for Health Security – to learn about the campaign, visit nmhealthsecurity.org – and retired physician Tyler Taylor. They will discuss a proposed health bill that would lead to a health insurance co-op covering about 80 percent of New Mexicans.

    The meeting agenda is as follows.

    • New Mexico primaries. Open primaries in  New Mexico. Speakers will discuss the pros and cons.

    • Eric Peterson, Los Alamos Open Space Specialist, will update the group on Stage 3 fire restrictions.
    • FLAP update and turnout.

    • League of Women Voters Karyl Armbruster, secretary of the New Mexico Public Education Commission will comment on Republican Lisa Shin’s arguments against universal pre-K and other public education policies.

  • Three local students have been awarded George and Joan Bjarke Scholarships.  

    The Bjarkes were longtime residents of Los Alamos and staunch supporters of education. A scholarship in their name is awarded annually to students who demonstrate good citizenship and the ability to successfully complete their selected degree or program.

    This year’s winners are Anastasija Draganic, Samantha Levings and Desere Martinez.

    The Bjarkes moved to Los Alamos in 1954 and raised six children, all of whom graduated from Los Alamos High School.

    George Bjarke worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and served several terms on the school board. He and his wife, Joan, believed every child deserved a chance to further their education.

    Draganic will attend Portland State University in the fall where she plans to major in economics.

    Levings is the daughter of Daniel Levings and Brandy Land. She plans to study biology and forensics at Eastern New Mexico University in the fall.

    Martinez is the daughter of Santiago and Esperanza Archuleta. She will attend California State University in the fall where she will major in biology.

  • The annual Fourth of July celebration in White Rock will be held again this year at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 366 Grand Canyon.

    For the second year, arrangements have been made for a U.S. flag to be flown over the National Cemetery in Santa Fe.

    An organized run/walk will transport the flag from Santa Fe that morning and arrive in White Rock in time for the parade.

    To be a part of the run, visit eventbrite.com/e/4th-of-july-memorial-flag-carry-2018-tickets-33532634011?aff=eac2.

    Organizers invite all veterans and current military personnel to join in the final leg of the run/walk from the intersection of Rover Boulevard and Grand Canyon Drive, two blocks east to the church parking lot. There, they will be honored with a short message, the history of the flag will be shared, and the raising of the colors will be followed by the national anthem. Anyone who wants to be part of this group are asked to meet at the intersection at 9:30 a.m.

    The Children’s Parade will begin after the ceremony. Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts from various area units will lead the parade carrying the colors. Any veterans or military personnel who want to participate in the short parade, will follow the colors, children of all ages will be after that.

  • One motto of the Search Institute for 2018 is that they bridge research and practice, “to help young people be and become their best selves.”

    One way for young people to even find their best self is through reading. How wonderful is it to get lost in a book. Can you recall the last time you read a book and literally didn’t want to put it down?

    I miss the Harry Potter book launches when people were lined up to purchase a book, not a phone, not a concert ticket, but a book. The Mesa Public Library’s waiting list for it was long, but you were happy to be on the list.

    The Asset category is Commitment to Learning and the Asset is called, Reading for Pleasure. This is defined as when a young person reads for three or more hours a week.

    My favorite kind of learning is when kids don’t even realize they are learning something. Reading for many of our youth is seen as that stuff you have to do in school in between taking the tests. This is one area where a small effort can make a huge impact.

  • One motto of the Search Institute for 2018 is that they bridge research and practice, “to help young people be and become their best selves.”

    One way for young people to even find their best self is through reading. How wonderful is it to get lost in a book. Can you recall the last time you read a book and literally didn’t want to put it down?

    I miss the Harry Potter book launches when people were lined up to purchase a book, not a phone, not a concert ticket, but a book. The Mesa Public Library’s waiting list for it was long, but you were happy to be on the list.

    The Asset category is Commitment to Learning and the Asset is called, Reading for Pleasure. This is defined as when a young person reads for three or more hours a week.

    My favorite kind of learning is when kids don’t even realize they are learning something. Reading for many of our youth is seen as that stuff you have to do in school in between taking the tests. This is one area where a small effort can make a huge impact.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court has issued its long-anticipated ruling in Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. In a 7-2 decision, the justices sided with a Denver bakery owner who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple. 

    The couple took the case to court in 2012 after the Christian baker turned down their business. A lower court ruled the baker violated Colorado’s public accommodations law, which forbids discrimination by businesses serving the public, including on the basis of sexual orientation.

    In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that Colorado officials “showed evidence of a clear and impermissible hostility toward the sincere religious beliefs” of the baker. 

  • SATURDAY
    Feature Film: National Parks Adventure
at 2 p.m. at the Nature center. Watch the most critically acclaimed giant screen film of the year on our new planetarium projector. This film is brought to Los Alamos by our sponsors: CB Fox, Metzger’s Hardware, and the Delle Foundation with additional funding from the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    White Rock Artist Market from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the White Rock Visitor Center, 15 NM 4, in White Rock.
    SUNDAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.
    MONDAY
    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present a commemorative Memorial Day Concert at 1 p.m. Monday on the lawn at Fuller Lodge. Patriotic selections, as well as fun tunes and medleys for the entire family, will performed. Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch and enjoy some great music.

  • LA Community Winds to host concert

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present a commemorative Memorial Day Concert at 1 p.m. Monday on the lawn at Fuller Lodge.
    Patriotic selections, as well as fun tunes and medleys for the entire family, will performed. Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch and enjoy some great music.
    Please note that this is a change from the original posted time and place.

    Memorial Day Ceremony set for Monday

    The community is invited to the Memorial Day Celebration to be held at 11 a.m. Monday at the Guaje Pines Cemetery in Los Alamos.
    A lunch will follow the ceremony at the American Legion Post 90 at 1325 Trinity Drive.

  • The Los Alamos Choral Society’s 2018 Memorial Day concert, “Freedom!,” is scheduled for 4 p.m. Sunday at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road, Los Alamos.

    Tickets will cost $15 per adult at CB Fox in Los Alamos or at the door. Student admission will be free.

    This will be the Choral Society’s first concert since Steve Paxton took over as conductor.
    Paxton, former chairman of the Contemporary Music Program at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, and a veteran of 25 years teaching music composition at Texas Tech, said in a recent interview that he chose music for this concert that reflected the values for which Americans have been willing to fight and die.

    Those values, as expressed in the music, range from freedom of religion to civil rights for all; from appreciation of labor to love of the land; from support for creativity in the arts to dreams of justice expressed by our founders and refined and widened in today’s hopes for a better future.

    The concert will begin with Choral Society and the audience singing “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which is based on a poem written by Francis Scott Key during the War of 1812, when, at dawn, he saw the U.S. flag still flying over Fort McHenry, which had withstood a bombardment by the Royal Navy.

  • An important part of the strategic plan of the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation is to provide quality professional development opportunities for educators. Twice annually teachers can apply for professional development grants from the LAPS Foundation. Last fall, several art teachers applied for a grant to attend the 2018 National Art Education Association (NAEA) National Convention in Seattle through Thursday. The LAPS Foundation was able to fund 4 teachers to attend: Daisy Gorman-Nichols (Mountain), Libbi Lovejoy (LAHS), and Elizabeth Fisher and Laura Parkison (LAMS).

    Two additional teachers, Renee Mitsunaga (Chamisa) and Mary Grace (LAHS), were able to attend with separate funding.

    In the request to the LAPS Foundation, Mitsunaga, chair of the LAPS art department, stated “As we [art teachers] collaborate to research, share best practices, techniques, and projects with each other, we recognize the need to look nationally to be current with the new, exciting, and changing trends in art education.”

  • There’s a sign I read every time I start to drive across Omega Bridge heading toward the lab.

    It’s not the largest, most prolific sign in Los Alamos County, just a simple sign, triangular in shape, black letters on a white background. Even though the sign’s message is simple, consisting of only two words, it may be the most powerful bit of signage we can be reading.

    All it says is: “Drive Friendly.”

    I like it. In fact, I like it a lot.

    I think each of us can benefit from a “friendly” little reminder every now and then, some maybe on a daily basis.
    Shortly after I moved here in February I found myself covering a story in which a driver actually pulled a gun on another driver and shot him in an apparent case of road rage.

    How could someone get so angry with another person that they think shooting them – while operating a motor vehicle, no less – is a proper way to solve the issue?

    I guess that could be said in response to a lot of issues involving anger these days.

    To be honest, I have in the past been know to holler at another driver after they’ve cut me off in traffic or done something that almost caused us to end up in an accident. Maybe even given them a dirty glance or sarcastic thumbs up.

  • Those looking to start a garden, or perhaps improve what they already have, should mark June 2 on the calendar. That’s the date the Los Alamos Master Gardeners Association is opening up six member gardens to the public.

    Called the Master Gardeners Garden Tour, the free event is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and will feature six gardens, five maintained by residents, and one by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. Residents are welcome to stop by each of the gardens between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., where the garden’s owners will give a tour and offer tips.

    “There will be people stationed at various places who will be able to answer questions,” former Los Alamos Master Gardener’s Association President Denise George said.

    Some of the gardens will have lists of plants that have been successful growing in Los Alamos County.

    The event is to show what’s possible in a mountain desert climate, for beginner gardeners and the advanced alike.