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Features

  • The local YMCA hopes that they can inspire Los Alamos residents to get on their feet this weekend to kick off America on the Move Week.

    America on the Move Week will be held Saturday through Sept. 27, with a goal to surpass the number of footsteps participants logged in 2007 by 20 million.

    “All you have to do to participate in this event is come into the YMCA or the Teen Center in Espaola and sign up to participate and you’ll receive a free pedometer,” said Melanie Chapman, YMCA fitness director.

  • To call this a Holocaust film is like calling Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” a love triangle. You have some explaining to do.

    Stefan Ruzowitsky’s “Flsher, Die,” or “The Counterfeiters” – 2008’s Oscar-winner for Best Foreign Language Film – takes place in a German concentration camp near the end of World War II. But like all memorable films, its setting serves more as a stage or catalyst than as the answer to the question, “What is this movie about?”

  • Why is a new Bond needed and what will it be used for?

    Over the years, the Los Alamos Public Schools have enjoyed a reputation for academic achievement and recognition by numerous groups and publications for excellence. While the district actively strives to provide an atmosphere where students can succeed, its buildings continue to age and deteriorate. Research documents that in well-built, attractive environments, student behavior is more positive and achievement is higher.

  • For this upcoming fundraiser, no formal attire or physical training is required; in fact, all that is needed to participate in the United Way of Northern New Mexico’s People Matter Bowling Event is some bowling shoes and a $30 donation.

    With these few requirements, participants can bowl from 6-9 p.m. Sept. 27 in the Big Rock Bowling Center in Espaola.

    In addition to helping out United Way in the current campaign to raise funds for its 18 agencies, people will also be awarded door prizes, giveaways and prizes for the highest and lowest scores.

  • Editor’s Note: This is a personal account of the Star Gazing on the Preserve event.

    At first the sky over the caldera was empty, except for a good-size wedge of the moon, which illuminated a pearl-gray light. But as the sky darken, it seemed as though a curtain was pulled back to the infinite amount of wonders the heavens contain.

    For those of us participating in the Star Gazing on the Preserve event, a handful of these features were seen in a closer view.

  • Missionary John Wakabi of Uganda has worked in the U.S. since 2001 after receiving a call from a higher power.

    “God sent me here,” he said, “to bring the message of repentance and healing.”

    He has spread this message all over the country, traveling to Texas, Colorado, North Carolina and Washington, D.C. He also spent time in Espaola in June where more than 1,000 people attended his service.

  • It was the final show of the season, but it felt like the closure of something else, too.

    The singer’s raspy, bluesy voice weaved through the night air while the crowd mingled in luau shirts and flower leis.

    There were food vendors and an artist painted animals’ faces on children. Young people ran around as cats and butterflies.

    Julie Stewart and the Motor Kings completed the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series – which began in May – but during the concert it was felt as though the band and the crowd were bidding farewell to the summer season.

  • When we see trash on a trail, whether we ignore this detritus of human existence or we pick it up, our perception of an otherwise pristine wilderness is altered.

    Yet if the crushed V8 can and the bottle cap are arranged on an old wooden plank, we are presented with an alternate reality.

    The current exhibit at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, “Everything Old is New Again: Recycled and Experimental” provides a unique opportunity for contemplating this dynamic.

  • Officials of National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC) announced the names of approximately 16,000 semifinalists in the 54th annual National Merit Scholarship Program.

    The 10 Los Alamos semifinalists in the 2009 National Merit Scholarship Program are: Adam Nekimken, Daniel Trugman, Lindsey Jacobs, Adam Izraelevitz, Adam Trujillo, Daniel Cox, Jonathan Robey, Bethany Sullivan, Lisa-Anne Hendricks and Daniel Dyer.

  • A 22-year tradition will continue at Little Forest Playschool Saturday.

    The school’s Fall Fiesta will be held from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and will feature activities for every age. There will be a silent auction, which will feature train rides, meals at restaurants and other items, and there will be a bubble pit, bouncy houses, petting zoo, booths and games.

    There will also be live entertainment, a bake sale and food sales.

    Samara Graham, a professional photographer in Los Alamos, will also be set up to photograph kids in the bubble pit.

  • What do members of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra – brass, woodwinds, strings and percussion ­– have in common? The answer is easy! They all love to play music – for themselves and for others.

    A presentation, made up of a variety of ensembles playing a variety of music, will be offered in a concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church

  • Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny was man ahead of his time. In 1846, he was commissioned to lead the Army of the West in the American takeover of Mexico’s land in the Southwest and California, which added almost a third to America’s current territory.

    While this achievement is controversial, it was also bloodless. Not a shot was fired during Kearny’s conquest.

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre’s short play festival “8x10 Again” will open Friday.

    This production is a follow-up to the successful September 2006 “8x10” festival and will likewise feature eight short 10-minute plays, directed by eight different directors. Five of the plays were written by local playwrights and are being presented on stage for the first time.

    The show opens with “Duet for Bear and Dog,” written by Sybil Rosen and directed by Gwen Lewis.

  • Saturday, a variety of community agencies are assembling to educate the community on what Boy Scouts have known for decades, how to be prepared. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in White Rock, will host its first annual Preparedness Fair under the coordination of church member Stacey Gartz.

    “We will have a series of exhibits and classes in the cultural hall of the church offered by our community’s best resources for getting your family prepared now and for the future,” said Gartz.

  • The Los Alamos Concert Association’s “Jewel of a Season” opens Sept. 14, with a sparkling performance by the Jupiter String Quartet. The performance begins at 4 p.m. in Duane Smith Auditorium, and will be followed by dinner with the artists at the Central Avenue Grill.

  • Nothing stays new forever. Cracks, creases and threadbare patches eventually appear, replacing shiny perfection.

    Aging does not mean gloomy, depressing times enter as happiness exits. It is just a different stage, a completely unique experience.

    Maintenance, however, may be a necessity in this stage. Sometimes a little more attention is required.

    For instance, the sculpture, “Grandmother’s Joy,” by Fritz White, was purchased in 1998 for the Betty Ehart Senior Center. Now, a decade later, it needs some TLC.

  • Dear friends of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series,

    Here we go with the last concert of the 2008 Summer Series.

    Friday, we’ll be at Zia Credit Union with local blues-rockers Julie Stewart and the Motor Kings and I hope you can join us.

    The Motor Kings are a five-piece band that plays mostly original music as well as the music of Etta James, The Allman Brothers, James Brown, Wilson Pickett, Robben Ford, Tina Turner and a few other classics and near classics.

  • There’s a new restaurant in town, but the hitch is, it’ll only be open for one night. Morrie Pongratz and the youth team for the United Way have reprised an age-old event called, Dinner over Diamond.

    Team Captain Ben Havemann and his crew will host dinner with the Diamond Diner, to raise funds for the United Way of Northern New Mexico.

    From 4:30-7:30 p.m. Sunday, drivers on Diamond Drive will see tables and waiters distributed evenly on the overpass by Los Alamos High School.

  • Ordinary people, your average bankers, waitresses and hotel managers, tend to get overlooked, because, well, they’re ordinary. They are just like the person standing next to them.

    The movie, “Hotel Rwanda,” dispels this conventional thought. It proves that the average man and woman can actually be far from ordinary, they can be extraordinary.

  • Did you know that the Jemez Mountains are known throughout the international mycological community as a location of abundant mushroom diversity? Ever wanted to know more about those funny fungi? Saturday, the community will get its chance.

    Join Mycologist Kristi Beguin for an introduction to the mushrooms that grow in the Jemez Mountains. Participants will hunt for mushrooms, discuss collection and identification methods and observe all the joys the rainy season can bring to mycophiles.