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Features

  • There’s nothing not to love about Roman, an Australian cattle dog crossbred with a boxer. He’s 2 years old, loves small, well-behaved children and big, well-behaved adults.

    Roman is pretty optimistic that his stay at the Los Alamos Animal Shelter will be a short one. Roman was recently transferred to Los Alamos County Animal Shelter from the Torrance Animal Shelter.

    According to shelter staff, he enjoys playing with humans, and there isn’t a squeaky toy he doesn’t love. Roman’s adoption fee is $75.  He has had all his shots and is microchipped.

    For more information call the shelter at 662-8179 or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • BY DEBBIE STONE
    Special to the Monitor

    It’s that time of year when you start to notice the signs of fall, like slightly cooler temps and crisp air, yellow school buses on the road and the slight tinge of colors on the leaves of trees. But, perhaps, one of the most obvious indicators is the roar of football fans cheering for their teams in stadiums across the country.

    Yes, it’s the onset of another football season, an annual rite that millions of Americans celebrate. For many, the anticipation ramps up in the final dog days of summer, and the excitement becomes palpable.

    If you’re a diehard fan of the game, a pilgrimage to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, is probably on your bucket list. Voted the Top Tourist Attraction in Ohio and America’s Best Attraction for Sports Fans, the Hall bills itself as

    “The Most Inspiring Place on Earth,” and is widely regarded as the “Sistine Chapel of Football.” And the fact that it’s located in Canton gives it additional significance, as this is the birthplace of professional football.

    The city made its mark in pro football back in 1920, when representatives of 10 teams gathered in town to form the American Pro Football Association, later renamed the National Football League.

  • Los Alamos will host a painting event and art show Sept. 14-16, featuring art that depicts scenes around Los Alamos.
    Sixty Plein Air painters have been invited to paint northern New Mexico scenes around Los Alamos.

    This event includes the “Paintout,” an art show at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, and a workshop for painters.

    Plein Air painting was started by French Impressionists who painted en plein air, or in the open air, but today, it is the largest movement in art history. New Mexico has been central to development of this trend, beginning with the Taos Masters, Santa Fe Cinco Pintores, Georgia O’Keefe, and others. Today, there are 370 members of the Plein Air painters of New Mexico

    For this event, those who attend will be treated to depictions of vistas and terrain in the Los Alamos area. Artists can choose from wide-ranging subjects.

    All of the work will be for sale at the Fuller Lodge Art Center Gallery afterwards from Sept 18-30.

    To own a unique work of art and meet the artist, this is a great opportunity. For the artist, it is a wonderful opportunity to interact with other painters, and these painter participants will select their best work for the exhibition with a “meet the artist” and awards presentation reception on Sept. 22.

  • Travel back in time to pre-World War II France next month for a special night on the historic coal-fired Cumbres & Toltec Railroad.

    The Murder Mystery Dinner Train returns Sept. 15 to thrill guests as they help solve a crime while riding through the Aspen trees.

    The Murder Mystery Dinner Train leaves the Chama Depot at 5 p.m.  This is a fun date night choice, complete with the fall Gold Rush of Aspen tree splendor.

    Guests will help solve the crime on this last train from Paris. The French cast will take riders to a time long ago in 1940 on the steam train that will swoop passengers from the Parisian Depot, fleeing the Nazi invasion and on-board, discovering an intriguing murder. 

    Period music will highlight the evening, as well as a fabulous dinner at the Cumbres Pavilion. 

    Guests are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite character from “Casablanca” and join in on the intrigue.

    The train will leave at 5 p.m. and be back by 9 p.m.

    The event will include a costume contest and live music by El Norteño, with a French “flair.”

  • JEMEZ SPRINGS — For the first time, Jemez Springs is holding a Labor Day weekend event on Sept. 1 and 2, “I (heart emoji) Jemez Art Festival.”

    The event celebrates the arts with two days of art exhibitions, demonstrations and art sales by a variety of local vendors from Jemez Springs.

    “We are very fortunate to have many talented artists who reside in Jemez Springs, whose arts and crafts are often reflective of the natural beauty of the area,” said organizer, Billy Ehret, who owns Mission Street Arts. “This event celebrates the art and artists through live demonstrations and provides opportunities to meet our local artists or purchase art.”

    A variety of artists from Jemez Springs galleries including Jemez Artisans, Jemez Fine Arts Gallery, Shangri La West, and Jemez Mountain Pottery and Sculpture (located in Casa Blanca Guest House) will offer demonstrations and sell items during the event. Jemez Mountain Inn, Canon del Rio, Highway 4 Cafe and Los Ojos Restaurant are also participating during the two-day event.

    Visitors will also have an opportunity to meet with and learn from local artists including Jules Giessing Gourley, Karen Trojillo-Heffernan, Raymond Sandoval and more.

  • Art exhibits
    National Museum of Nuclear Science & History has opened a permanent exhibit by American sculptor Jim Sanborn called “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” which recreates the Manhattan Project experiments that determined when plutonium goes “critical in an atomic bomb.” The museum is open seven days a week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and is located at 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, in Albuquerque. Call 505-245-2137 for information, or visit nuclearmuseum.org.

    New Mexico History Museum and Santa Fe Opera to recognize “Atomic Histories” in 2018 and 2019. The History Museum’s exhibition will run through May 2019. The History Museum is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe. Call 476-5200 for more information. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October and closed Mondays November through April.

    Friday Art Walking Tours from 10-11 a.m. at the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe. Meet at the gift shop steps Fridays June through August. Call the front desk to confirm: 505-476-5063. Cost: $10 per adult. Call 505-476-5072 for more information.

    Dance

  • Help improve Quemazon Trail with the Santa Fe National Forest and the Pajarito Environmental Education Center Sept. 1.

    This trail workday will last from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and is the perfect opportunity for Los Alamos residents to give back to our incredible trail system. There will be trail maintenance jobs for all ages, and U.S. Forest Service experts will be on site to ensure safety and provide instructions.

    Volunteers should pre-register for this project at peecnature.org.

    Participants will meet at the Los Alamos Nature Center at 9 a.m. and carpool to the trailhead. Once there, they will hike in approximately 45 minutes to the project site. Volunteers need to wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy boots and a hat. They should bring water, snacks, lunch and work gloves. Hard hats, some tools, some extra pairs of gloves and good company will be provided. Volunteers can bring their own tools if they prefer.

    For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Enjoy seeing photos and hearing the memories of Ray and Joy Green’s travels to Utah Canyon Country on Tuesday at the monthly Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting.

    The Greens will share faded slides and memories spanning 50 years of travel at the Los Alamos Nature Center after the regular Mountaineers’ meeting.

    The Greens’ talk will start by 7:15 p.m. and is free and open to the public. The Mountaineers’ general meeting will begin at 7 p.m. and cover information about upcoming outings.

    At this talk, the Greens will present slides from several of their many trips to Utah Canyon Country in the late 1960s.

    Today, members of the Mountaineers continue to frequent this area – and capture far more impressive images with the superior equipment now available. The Greens will also examine how this area has changed in the last half-century.

    In particular, they intend to note differences in the natural environments and how invasive species have changed them, changes in roadways and access, land administration and rules of use and recreational usage. Some of the locations that will be discussed include Cathedral in the Desert, Davis Gulch, the Burr Trail and Boulder to Escalante Road, Orderville Gulch and Squaw Flats and its surrounding trails.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre is asking the community to come and help them get the Performing Arts Center ready for LALT’s 75th anniversary season.

    LALT will hold its second and final summer work party on Saturday starting at 10 a.m.

    Work will be focused on the building. Tasks  will include organizing and decluttering the costume, green and prop rooms.

    The group will also address carpentry and  maintenance tasks.

    Lunch will be provided.

  • I have always been fascinated with Native American culture, which is one of the reasons why living in northern New Mexico has been such a wonderful experience.

    It’s been interesting to visit the pueblos and see firsthand the history of the various people who live there and hear the stories of their lives as passed down from generation to generation.

    Saturday and Sunday I was fully immersed in the culture when I attended the Santa Fe Indian Market, an event of which I’ve never seen anything like it that’s comparable, and not just from the aspect of volume of people in attendance or number of vendors lined up in their booths to sell their wares.

    At more than one booth I was told how a grandfather or grandmother had passed knowledge and instruction for making a product down the family line to younger members who followed the tradition and are now the ones making the product.

    The paintings, carvings, baskets and clothing were phenomenal. The smell of the fry bread was captivating and each of the vendors where I stopped were extremely friendly in explaining the processes by which their products were made and how those processes had been handed down through their family’s ancestors.

  • Learn about the life of black bear cubs at the Los Alamos Nature Center Wildlife biologist Daryl Ratajczak will give this free presentation at 7 p.m. Tuesday about the trials and tribulations of a young black bear’s life to kick off Bear Week at the nature center.

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation are hosting a series of events throughout the week, culminating with Bear Festival on Saturday, Aug. 25.

    In this talk, called “A Cub’s Life,” Ratajczak will give an overview of a black bear cub’s life through the seasons, starting with the moment it is born in a darkened den to its first steps as an independent yearling bear. He currently works as a wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service in the Santa Fe National Forest. Apex predators and other large mega-fauna are his passion and specialty. Prior to joining the Forest Service, Ratajczak managed a black bear rehabilitation, research and education facility outside Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

  • Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church will host a fundraiser tea, fashion show and silent auction at 2:30 p.m. Aug. 25 in Kelly Hall, 3900 Trinity Drive.

    Scrumptious savory and sweet items featuring locally grown produce will be served along with copious amounts of tea.

    The fashion show will feature men’s fashions from The Shop on the Corner Thrift Store. Proceeds support house building efforts in Juarez, Mexico.

    Adults $25, children 10 and under $10. Advance ticket purchase recommended.

    Tickets available at Shop on the Corner Wednesday mornings and in the church office. Call 662-5107.

  • Well as you read this, it is that time of year, the night before school starts. You might not even have time to read it on this day.

    The Leadership Los Alamos class has a sort of running joke about which class is the best class. It is just a light-hearted jab to inspire everyone to think about their ability to be great.

    Well the truth comes out today, I am biased because the “Best Class,” begins their senior year tomorrow, the Class of 2019!

    I will wear my class of 2019 t-shirt proudly and try not to cry as my son, Aaron, leaves for his senior year of high school.

    The other reason I like the Class of 2019 is because in their seventh-grade year, 52 of them signed up to become the first WEB Crew leaders for Los Alamos Middle School. It is this class that would then become the first class that served in both roles of middle school leaders and high school LINK Crew leaders.
    Today was the day that both the WEB Crew and the LINK Crew welcomed in both incoming seventh-graders and newly minted freshmen.

    It makes me so happy and proud that these programs are successful and make a difference to so many.

    The crew members are meant to welcome, set the year off on a good note and ease the tensions of returning to school.

  • Art exhibits
    National Museum of Nuclear Science & History has opened a permanent exhibit by American sculptor Jim Sanborn called “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” which recreates the Manhattan Project experiments that determined when plutonium goes “critical in an atomic bomb.” The museum is open seven days a week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and is located at 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, in Albuquerque. Call 505-245-2137 for information, or visit nuclearmuseum.org.

    New Mexico History Museum and Santa Fe Opera to recognize “Atomic Histories” in 2018 and 2019. The History Museum’s exhibition will run through May 2019. The History Museum is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe. Call 476-5200 for more information. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October and closed Mondays November through April.

    Friday Art Walking Tours from 10-11 a.m. at the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave., Santa Fe. Meet at the gift shop steps Fridays June through August. Call the front desk to confirm: 505-476-5063. Cost: $10 per adult. Call 505-476-5072 for more information.
     

  • For four years, the Albuquerque Ukekopelli Festival has brought some of the best-known ukulele instructor/performers to New Mexico to perform in a Friday evening concert and teach workshops for all levels of players, beginners to advanced.

    This year, with the theme of “Comic Books & Super Heroes,” the  festival features concert performers Jim and Liz Beloff, Fred and Lynn  Sokolow and Gerald Ross, plus instructors Craig McClelland, Sage Harrington, Jared Putnam, and Judy Muldawer.

    The festival kicks off Sept. 28, with a concert at 7 p.m. at the African American Performing Arts Center at Expo New Mexico. Then the fun continues the next day at the Albuquerque Marriott with workshops, vendors and a catered lunch, with final workshops Sunday.

    Workshop topics include Blues Ukulele with Fred Sokolow, the songs of Lyle Ritz with Jim Beloff, Intro to Swing Ukulele with Gerald Ross, Intro to Fingerpicking with Craig McClelland, Music Theory Demystified with Sage  Harrington, Jam in Any Key with Jared Putnam, plus many more.

  • The Museum Hill in Santa Fe offers local and visitors alike many events at the museums and botanical garden for free during Community Day Sept. 32.

    This event attracts 2,000 people to Museum Hill, where all museums offer a slew of activities for the entire family. 
    Community Day has become one of the capital city’s most popular annual events.

    This daylong event is hosted by Museum Hill Partners, which include the: Museum of International Folk Art; Museum of Indian Arts and Culture; International Folk Art Alliance; Museum of Spanish Colonial Art; the National Park Service; Santa Fe Botanical Garden; and the Wheelwright Museum of The American Indian.

    “Each year on this special day, we look forward to sharing the unique treasures of Museum Hill as a way of saying ‘thank you’ to the dedicated community of museum lovers for supporting our museums and the beautiful Santa Fe Botanical Garden,” said Department of Cultural Affairs Cabinet Secretary Veronica Gonzales.

    Events include:

    • 9 a.m.-4 p.m.: Museum of Indian Arts & Culture: Mural Painting on the Plaza and Indigenous Food Informational Booth.

    • 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Gerardo’s Andale Food Truck Wheelwright Museum.

  • CIMARRON – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is offering a special hunter education camp where youth can receive hands-on training and earn their hunter education certification for free.

    To hunt legally in New Mexico, youths under 18 years of age must first successfully complete a hunter education course or be registered in the department’s Mentored-Youth Hunting Program.

    The camp is open to youth ages 10 to 17 who are accompanied by a responsible adult, also registered for the camp. It will be conducted the weekend of Sept. 7-8, at the renowned Philmont Boy Scout Ranch near Cimarron. Meals and lodging in canvas tents are free.

    Registration for this camp opportunity is now open. Participants must complete and return the registration form available at wildlife.state.nm.us/education/hunter-education/ by noon, Aug. 19, to be eligible. Slots will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis.

    The department is hosting the camp in partnership with the Safari Club International Foundation.

  • Celebrate black bears with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center and Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation at the second annual Bear Festival! The festival will be held on Saturday, Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and the nature center’s schedule is packed full of bear-themed programming all week long leading up to it.

    The week will kick off on Tuesday, Aug. 21 at a talk called “A Cub’s Life” from U.S. Forest Service wildlife biologist Daryl Ratajczak. Ratajczak will discuss the life of a black bear cub from the moment it’s born in a darkened den to its first steps as an independent yearling bear. The talk is free and will begin at 7 p.m. at the nature center.

    On Aug. 24, PEEC and LEWF will host the second-ever “Eat Like a Bear Buffet” from 6-8 p.m. Attendees will eat a dinner completely inspired by a black bear’s diet. The menu will feature smoked salmon catered by Pig + Fig, stuffed mushrooms off the grill, ants on a log, a big salad, rose hip tea, sub sandwiches served from a trash can, log cakes, chocolate acorns and more. The night will be fun, educational and delicious! Tickets for the dinner are on sale now at peecnature.org and are $50 for non-members and $40 for PEEC members.

  • During the most recent of my travels among the mesas and canyons of Northern New Mexico I discovered not one, but two, fabulous places to hunker down and ride out a storm.

    And both were on either side of the highway that takes travelers to and from Abiquiu.

    Since moving to Los Alamos, I’ve been trying to connect with locations in this part of the Land of Enchantment that played host to movie or television productions.

    I love watching movies and have gotten several suggestions on ones to watch that were filmed in the area.

    Our pressman here at the Los Alamos Monitor, Brian Dunwoody, told me he’s related to the owners of the rattlesnake that makes an appearance near the end of the movie “Hell or High Water” and how the movie was filmed in New Mexico.

    I’ve been close to where scenes for Only the Brave were filmed on the ski hill. And to Diablo Canyon in Sante Fe, which was mentioned in Hostiles and 3:10 to Yuma.

    There are so many more. Which is why I loaded up after church a couple of Sundays ago and headed for Abiquiu, a place rich in movie history.

  • In the waning days of The Black Hole in 2012, hundreds, if not thousands, of people stopped by to purchase what was left of the military surplus store’s inventory during a massive liquidation sale.

    The store’s founder, prominent anti-nuclear activist Ed Grothus, died in 2009, and his family no longer had the resources to keep the well-known store and institution to anti-nuclear activity in New Mexico open.

    As visitors came to purchase or take away the many pieces of castoff equipment from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, one visitor came to give something back to the store that served as a rallying point for those against nuclear warfare and those that weren’t afraid to put the activities going on at the Los Alamos National Laboratory under a microscope.

    Janire Najera, a photographer and visual artist who lives in the United Kingdom, dropped by at first because she was curious.

    “I was in New Mexico preparing for another project which entailed a month long road trip following the Old Spanish Trail from Santa Fe to Los Angeles when a friend shared with me a local newspaper article about the liquidation sale of The Black Hole,” Najera said.