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Today's Opinions

  • Thanks for the work, now get out

    Since June, 77 state workers have seen their jobs evaporate. Civil service jobs, which
     are usually safe. Some news reports noted the governor’s earlier promises to not lay off state workers, she’s also said more often that state government is over-populated.
    As a new fiscal year approached, with stripped-down budgets, it was time to make the hard decisions.
    In September, Tourism Secretary Monique Jacobson laid off 11 people, including seven of 17 staff members at New Mexico Magazine, and another 16 at Expo New Mexico, one-third of jobs at the State Fair.

  • It could have happened...

    It was one of those foggy eerie days that rarely come in October, and little things had been going wrong all day.
    The front door had blown opened several times, I am quite sure that I had secured it when I closed it after my husband Jerry left for work.
    Then the telephone rang, and when I answered it, I could not quite hear the person on the other end, when I tried to make a phone call several hours later the phone was not working.
    I built a small fire in the fireplace in hope of shrugging off the eerie feeling, and to bring cheer into the house. It was a fruitless effort for an odd gust of wind came down the chimney, not only did the fire go out but ashes were spread across the front room.

  • Troubled PRC in need of a big makeover

    How is the best way to pick our leaders? It is a problem every democracy wrestles with. In our country, we try it two different ways.
    At the federal level, we elect a president and he chooses everyone else. If one of them messes up, the president is responsible so the appointee usually is gone quickly. The result is a team effort.
    At the state level, voters choose a governor, secretary of state, attorney general, auditor, treasurer, land commissioner and five corporation commissioners.
    If one of them messes up, that person is responsible. The governor usually is not well acquainted with the individual. Few voters are acquainted with the individual either. They likely voted based on party line.

  • Let’s stabilize those precarious boulders

    I’ve watched with interest the debate about what, if anything, should be done with the N.M. 502/Trinity Drive Corridor project.
    It appears that there’s money to be spent and we must find a way to spend it – to avoid losing it – regardless of the impact on quality-of-life for commuters and local residents.
    After reading about the “near miss” incident on the main hill road, wherein a car was demolished by a falling boulder (not the first time this has happened), I’d like to suggest that if  money MUST be spent on road improvements, we turn our attention away from the N.M. 502 project and think about stabilizing the mountainside that periodically rains life-threatening boulders onto vehicles in route to Los Alamos.

  • We are failing children

    When Gov. Martinez came into office back in January, among her top priorities was to turn New Mexico’s failing educational system around.
    To say that it is “failing” sounds harsh, but it describes reality.
    The problem is that, having had two opportunities to move towards fixing the problem, the legislature has thrown up roadblock after roadblock in a (so-far successful) attempt to keep the status quo in place.
    First, the problem: According to the “Diplomas Count 2011” report from the Education Research Center, New Mexico’s real graduation rate is 57.1 percent.

  • Just A Wag 10-14-11

    Councilor gets married

    We have learned that County Councilor Mike Wismer married UNM-LA Campus Resources Director Lisa Clough in a small private ceremony with family members Sept. 9. The couple honeymooned in Alaska.

    Send us your wags

    “Just a wag” features initial snippets of news heard around town.  
    The wags may grow to larger stories or simply remain snippets, either way this is meant to spark interest and provide food for thought.
    E-mail wags to lanews@lamonitor.com.

  • Take your best shot

    When I was a youngster in the 1960s, I had all the shots little kids went through back in the day.
    And because I’m a klutz and regularly hurt myself outdoors, I’ve periodically had my tetanus immunity updated. A few years ago I underwent a series of shots for rabies after having a scary adventure with an ill coyote.
    Last summer I got the shingles vaccine when my assistant was suffering from a shingles outbreak.
    And to round it all out, tonight after work I’ll be getting the influenza vaccine for this season’s strains of flu virus.
    My long history of receiving vaccinations – even including the potent shots given for rabies – has not caused me more than temporary discomfort.

  • Tired campaign data

    In 2010, when then U.S. Rep. Harry Teague was running for re-election against Steve Pearce, I checked his campaign website, looking for a position statement on a certain issue.
    I couldn’t get past the front page. To get into the site, the reader had to sign in and provide an e-mail address.
    What? A candidate for public office won’t let an undecided voter look at his position statements?
    I checked again recently.  The “Harry for Congress 2010” website is still online, and you can now click a “skip” button and go to the site without signing in.
    The site doesn’t appear to have been updated since the 2010 election. It looks like a 2010 campaign office frozen in time – but now you can see it.