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Today's Opinions

  • Time to stop debating and start building

    I have been reading letters to the editor and guest editorials about the wisdom of entering into an agreement with North American Development Group to develop the Trinity Site with Smith’s as the anchor tenant.  
    I served on the committee that extended an RFP for this project to more than 80 developers.  
    We chose the best five proposals on which to conduct due diligence and interview.  
    The committee was a diverse group of citizens who represented Los Alamos and White Rock with varied ages, family structures and backgrounds.  
    Our main objective was to maximize income for the Los Alamos Public Schools and select the best project presented to achieve this goal.  

  • Gary goes Libertarian

    Gary Johnson is moving. A few days ago, I told you where several of New Mexico’s former politicos are hanging out.
    I said former Gov. Gary Johnson usually could be found in the mountains of New Hampshire doing something adventurous plus a little politicking.
    Johnson felt like the victim in the famous movie “Catch 22.”
    He couldn’t get on the stage with other candidates for debates because his poll numbers were so low.
    And his poll numbers were low because the national GOP and its state affiliates omitted him from the ballots they prepared for news organizations to use in determining the candidates invited to speak.

  • Another special favor for the Spaceport

     It’s all go for Spaceport America. According to Christine Armstrong, executive director of the Spaceport Authority, 500 people already are signed up to fly into space with Virgin Galactic, at a ticket price of $200,000 apiece. A grand visitor center is scheduled to open in 2013.  
    Since the spaceport is several miles from I-25, two welcome centers will be constructed convenient to the highway, and shuttle buses will take visitors from those centers to the spaceport itself. After the current bond issues expire, the facility has a plan to be self-supporting.

  • Keep it civil - can the cutesy

    Without entering whether the currently planned Trinity Site development is desirable or not — it’s already been a lengthy and probably continuing slog — I do object to George Chandler’s divisions of opinions in his op- ed of Jan. 3.
    Classifying opinion holders as “nattering nabobs of negativity” as opposed to “positive visionaries” (does he consider himself one of those?) is about as useful a dividing  opinion holder as “fair representatives of the community” versus “the opinioned who think they know better.”
    That may be just as, if not, more accurate. But this kind of labeling just deepens a divide on a number of issues here.

  • Trinity Site repackaged

    Nattering nabobs of negativity against the patient visionaries? More likely weary realists against those who want to maintain the status quo packaged in a new wrapper.
    The Trinity Site Project is no longer even close to the concept that was originally pitched to us. The reality is that we will have spent a ridiculous amount of our collective money to have the same limited options as before.
    As an added bonus, we’ll probably have another vacant building to drive by on the way to our only choice.

    Mike Browne
    Los Alamos

  • NADG’s plan isn’t new

    OMG! Did you see the front page of the Jan. 3 Los Alamos Monitor?  I guess I just don’t get it. Am I the only one who thinks the North American Development Group (NADG) proposal for Trinity Site is exactly what we already have?  
    Just look at the drawing, come on folks, I could have come up with that for a lot less $$$. If this drawing depicts what “we” are looking for then gosh darn it plant a bunch of trees in the current Smith’s parking lot and have Smith’s expand into the property they already own.   

  • The more things change ... the more they stay the same

    On the state’s 75th anniversary of statehood, historian Richard Melzer asked how New Mexico’s economy – in 1987 and the previous 75 years – could be described in the same terms: alternately sunny and gloomy.
    We’re still asking that question this year on the statehood centennial.
    Melzer observed that the state’s successes resulted from a happy combination of resources and demand.
    Coal was discovered near Gallup and Raton just as railroads and smelters needed a source in the Southwest.
    World War II and the Cold War gave us the labs, which, in turn, launched or helped attract high-tech industry.
    After World War II, when the nation needed oil and natural gas, New Mexico had both in abundance.

  • Good luck grappling with legacy issues

    It is good to read in the Los Alamos Monitor (Nov.  22-23) that environmental remediation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is starting to shift its emphasis.  
    A bias for action is starting to replace the New Mexico Environment Department’s (NMED) need to study things to death.
    In the first six years of the compliance order on consent, studies NMED required LANL to perform cost about $900 million and consumed more than 90 percent of the total budget for those years.   
    LANL already had 35 years of study and research before the order. NMED Secretary F. David Martin and the Martinez administration have a real challenge to reverse the NMED “bring me another rock” syndrome.