.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Letters to the Editor 4-16-15

    Forcing not an effective tactic
    Much as I respect Rebecca Shankland, climate change has not yet come close to making Los Alamos water-front property, so I sincerely doubt there is much danger of our plastic bags invading any ocean.
    As with most things, there are pros and cons to forcing, as opposed to the generally more effective social encouragement, (cf. use of cigarettes) of beneficial behaviors. However, knee-jerk references to irrelevancies have little if any positive effect.
    Terry Goldman
    Los Alamos

    Middle East needs equilibrium
    Due to indecision by the Obama White House to support moderate Sunni rebels in Syria, Islamic terrorists in Syria (ISIS) were able to reposition forces and attack the Iraqi Army, which folded and abandoned its U.S. equipment, including many Humvees and 155mm guns.
    The Iraqi government requested air strikes against ISIS, but President Barack Obama ignored the request, referring to ISIS as the “JV Team.”
    The result was ISIS captured our military equipment, and established territory from which they can launch terrorist attacks.
    We belatedly decided to send advisers to assist the Iraqi army, and we launched air strikes against ISIS.

  • He said, she said: Session’s best quotes

    One thing everyone agrees on is that this was a more difficult, more demanding session than usual.
    Still, there are insights, revelations and lighter moments. Here’s my third annual Quotes of the Session.
    Richard Anklam, executive director, New Mexico Tax Research Institute: “It’s important to remember the process itself is by design slow and tedious. The legislative process is the sand in the wheels of progress — and that’s not always a bad thing. For every good idea there are lots of not-so-good ones, and political expediency often yields the worst legislation. Even good policy requires extensive vetting to be well crafted and properly implemented. So, thank your elected officials for their hard work and a job well done.”
    Rep. Randal Crowder, R-Clovis: “Fifteen days from now I will leave this chair and go sit in another chair as city commissioner, and the fire chief will be sitting in front of me. In the older parts of Clovis, we have fire hydrants that wouldn’t put out enough water to make a pot of coffee.”
    Sen. George Muñoz, on the budget: “We’re going to turn on the sprinkler and things will get kind of green, but nothing will grow.”

  • Character and teamwork keep bus company in the family

    The Silver City economy was thriving in 1996 when Christina Montoya bought her family’s bus company from her parents and continued its contract with the Cobre Consolidated School District to transport students.
    In 2001, Montoya approached The Loan Fund for money to finance the replacement of two of Montoya Transportation’s older buses.
    When two Silver City bus companies announced they were looking for buyers, Montoya secured a loan with local AmBank to buy both fleets and assume their contracts with Silver City schools.
    But just as Montoya’s business was expanding, the local economy contracted. Starting in 2002, hundreds of mine workers left town after massive layoffs at the Chino copper mine — the area’s largest employer.
    School enrollment shrank, leaving Montoya with lots of buses but fewer young passengers.
    “It was a struggle to make it every month,” Montoya recalled of those years when she was supporting six children on a shrinking paycheck. “There were times I had nothing left over.”
    Persistence and
    partnerships

  • Inflation, debt payments eat 30 percent of road funds

    Personal transportation vehicles powered by fossil fuels — cars, SUVs and pickups, that is — will be around for a long, long time.
    So will commercial trucks, which, with rail, are vital links in moving goods around the country.
    Roads will be around, too. Roads were crucial well before the combustion engine appeared. Check your Roman history. All this means we’re stuck with building and maintaining roads.
    And paying for this work.
    Governments pay for nearly all roads — federal, state and local. Yet, for years the state has been well short of having the road money it claims it needs.
    The recitation of this banal obviousness comes because the state’s political leadership has ignored the situation, a derogation of duty. Here is a summary of our sources of money.
    About $840 million will come into the Department of Transportation during fiscal 2016, the budget year starting July 1, according to “Legislating for Results: Appropriation Recommendation,” published by the Legislative Finance Committee in January. DOT requested $837.7 million; the LFC recommended $842.7 million.
    The difference, though large from the perspective of nearly all individuals, is small on the scale of things.

  • Los Alamos native to teach traditional oil painting

    There’s something exotic about painting with oils. Many artists will say that no other medium compares to working with the same medium as the great masters of old. Painting in oils is like painting with butter. Oil paint is thick and can be spread, pushed, troweled, brushed and scraped. Because it dries slowly paintings can evolve, with colors mixed on the canvas in order to create an effect.
    Artist Trevor Lucero wants to help students share in the mysteries of getting the paint to reflect their vision, to capture reflected light so realistically it delights the viewer. Although he developed this class with intermediate students in mind, he welcomes raw beginners, as well as more accomplished oil painters. Lucero say, “The amazing light of our New Mexico landscapes gives artists a great excuse to mash colors together.”
    In his class “Traditional Genres in Oil Painting” Lucero will teach how to build a painting in the traditional way: constructing an underpainting and working toward a completed image using a succession of glazes to achieve luminosity. Students will work on portraits, still lifes, or landscapes using photographs. The class meets from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays April 16-30 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center.

  • How corporate tax loopholes compromise our future

    The notion of “paying it forward” is a popular one, and while we may not think about our income taxes as a form of paying it forward, that’s exactly what we’re doing.
    The public works that we all depend upon today — roads and highways, schools and parks, telecommunications and electrical grids, even courts and prisons — were made possible in part by taxes paid by past generations. And the taxes we pay today won’t just go toward keeping these systems and infrastructure in good repair, they will also be needed to plan for our future and address unexpected issues and opportunities.
    This kind of long-term vision is the foundation upon which the United States was built.
    Our public works and infrastructure don’t just improve our quality of life, they also make our modern economy possible. Savvy American corporations understand that they depend on this infrastructure and that they bear responsibility for helping to pay for it.
    As the new report “Burning Our Bridges” (Center for Effective Government) shows, much of our nation’s infrastructure needs could be covered simply by collecting income tax on the profits that several corporations have retained overseas.

  • Letter to the editor 4-14-15

    Cloth bags are worth the effort

    I’m a bit puzzled about the sense of outrage expressed by people who’d like to keep the convenience of having “free” (Smith’s does pay for them) single-use (I know, lots of people re-use them, which is great) plastic bags.
    In 2008-2009 a group of kids in grades 4-6 (the Kinnikinnick Club) wanted to do something for the world. They researched small actions that could have a large effect and decided to ask Smith’s to encourage the use of cloth bags instead of paper or plastic.
    They gave a nice presentation to the Smith’s employees and Smith’s put up the signs you see now that say, “Did you forget your cloth bags?”  Smith’s also gave a 5-cent credit (later a green points credit) to those using cloth bags.
    Did those kids (and Smith’s) make a difference?  On March 9, 2009, the manager sent a letter telling the kids that Smith’s stores in Los Alamos and White Rock were under budget by 865,170 bags and added that that equated to “432 cases less in plastic bags making it to our land fill.”  Furthermore, Smith’s then introduced this program “throughout the entire Kroger Company.”

  • Loonies on the loose

    The “news” is too much with us.
    True, print news venues have troubles galore, have had for a long time now.
    But anything electronic — television, blogospheric, streaming, screening, online, live, recorded, you name it — positively fibrillates as it belches forth endless servings of routinely unedited rumor, claims, charges/counter-charges, pure hokum and mindless opinion masquerading as “news.”
    Last week, when a guy named Tom Cotton opined to the effect that it would be far easier simply to bomb Iran than to continue negotiations designed to forestall that country’s efforts to develop its own nuclear weapons, I became halfway persuaded that too many loonies are making too many headlines today.
    It was Cotton, a brand new Republican U.S. senator from Arkansas, who whipped out that infamous letter (co-signed by 47 other Senate Republicans) to Iran’s Ayatollah Khamenei basically warning him that the negotiations were doomed inasmuch as the GOP controls both houses of Congress.
    Cotton had been in the Senate only a matter of weeks, but the media — particularly online — snapped it all up: Cotton, his letter, his cohorts, their bomb, the whole thing. They couldn’t get enough of it.