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Today's News

  • Locals react to Iran deal withdrawal

    In an 11 minute speech Tuesday from the White House, President Donald Trump dismantled the United States’ 2015 nuclear accord with Iran, otherwise known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, calling Iran “the leading state sponsor of terror,” and that the deal with Iran created under the Obama Administration was “defective at it’s core.”

    Dr. Siegfried Hecker, a former Los Alamos National Laboratory director and senior fellow with the Center for International Security and Cooperation, told the Stanford News Service Tuesday that in spite of Trump’s announcement, there’s still a chance Iran will honor the deal – with or without U.S. approval.

    “I don’t see Iran making a mad dash for nuclear weapons to respond to the U.S. withdrawal,” Hecker told the Stanford News Service. “The country has too much to lose. Tehran could decide to keep the essence of the deal with the other countries and isolate the U.S. It may find that it will get adequate sanctions relief from the other countries in spite of U.S. pressure. That may be sufficient for Iran to continue to honor its nuclear deal commitments for now.”

    T. Douglas Reilly, a retired Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist who worked at the lab for 38 years, was devastated by the news Tuesday.

  • Sexual misconduct investigation sought against lawmaker

    SANTA FE (AP) — Allegations by a political lobbyist that she was sexually harassed by a state lawmaker were referred to a subcommittee of lawmakers and outside council for investigation on Tuesday.

    Former lobbyist and animal welfare activist Laura Bonar went public last week in an open letter with allegations that she was sexually harassed on multiple occasions by Democratic Rep. Carl Trujillo as they worked together on legislation in 2013 and 2014.

    Trujillo says the allegations are lies and has cast blame on political opponents. The Santa Fe-area legislator could not immediately be reached for comment. Bonar has urged Trujillo to resign.

    After her attorney submitted the letter as a formal complaint on Tuesday, leading House lawmakers and an independent attorney determined that further investigation was needed. Raul Burciaga, director of the Legislature's legal office, said four state lawmakers — two Democrats and two Republicans — and outside counsel will conduct the investigation.

    In her complaint, Bonar said she was propositioned and touched inappropriately and that Trujillo later shut her out of the legislative process in 2014 when she rejected his advances. Later, Bonar switched from her job as a lobbyist for Animal Protection Voters to an administrative position with the organization.

  • How Google aims to make your gadgets smarter with AI

    By RYAN NAKASHIMA and MAE ANDERSON, AP Technology Writers

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Google put the spotlight on its artificial intelligence smarts at its annual developers conference Tuesday, announcing new consumer features imbued with machine learning.

    Many of the updates have a practical bent, designed to ease tasks such as composing emails, making lists, navigating city streets and lessening the digital distractions that have increasingly addled people's lives as a result of previous tech industry innovations.

    One of the biggest crowd-pleasers for the thousands of software developers who gathered at the outdoor conference was an augmented reality feature on Google Maps that helps people get walking directions. Users will be able to follow arrows — or possibly a cartoon-like creature — that appear on a camera view showing the actual street in front of them.

    Some new features for Android phones also aim to improve people's digital well-being, including a new "shush" mode that automatically turns on the "Do Not Disturb" function if someone flips their phone face down on a table. And "Wind Down Mode" will fade the screen to greyscale at a designated bedtime to help users disconnect before bed.

  • Trump decides to exit nuclear accord with Iran

    By CATHERINE LUCEY and JOSH LEDERMAN, Associated Press

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the landmark nuclear accord with Iran on Tuesday, abruptly restoring harsh sanctions in the most consequential foreign policy action of his presidency. He declared he was making the world safer, but he also deepened his isolation on the world stage and revived doubts about American credibility.

    The 2015 agreement, which was negotiated by the Obama administration and included Germany, France and Britain, had lifted most U.S. and international economic sanctions against Iran. In exchange, Iran agreed to restrictions on its nuclear program, making it impossible to produce a bomb and establishing rigorous inspections.

    But Trump, a severe critic of the deal dating back to his presidential campaign, said in a televised address from the White House that it was "defective at its core."

    U.S. allies in Europe had tried to keep him in and lamented his move to abandon it. Iran's leader ominously warned his country might "start enriching uranium more than before."

    The sanctions seek to punish Iran for its nuclear program by limiting its ability to sell oil or do business overseas, affecting a wide range of Iranian economic sectors and individuals.

  • Pet of the Week 5-6-18

    If you meet Sid, a Bombay-American Shorthair cat at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, you have to keep a secret from him. He thinks he’s a black panther.

    But in reality, Sid is like most cats at the animal shelter – very friendly and in desperate need of a forever home.
    He’s a bit of a big boy, too, for a 9-month old.

    Another thing people should know about him is that he’s never really had a forever home. Los Alamos County Shelter volunteers received him from the Animal Welfare Coalition of Northeastern New Mexico. Sid had been at the coalition shelter from the age of 7 weeks old.

    It’s a bit of a mystery too, since volunteers say he’s very friendly toward humans (including children), other cats and dogs.

    Sid likes to sleep in small spaces. Sid has been micro chipped, and has been vaccinated and is disease free.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • Primary candidate forum features House District 43 and judges May 9

    The Los Alamos League of Women Voters invites the public to the final candidate forum to introduce candidates who have opposition in the June 5 primary election.

    The forum is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 9 at Fuller Lodge.

    Come to the forum on Wednesday, May 9, at Fuller Lodge. Refreshments and conversation with the candidates will begin at 6:30 p.m.

    Candidates expected to attend this forum will be:

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 2: Gregory S. Shaffer, Donna M. Bevacqua-Young, Maria E. Sanchez-Gagne, and Jerry A. Archuleta (all Democrats);

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 5:  Jason Lidyard and Matthew Jackson (both Democrats)

    • New Mexico House of Representatives, District 43: Pete Sheehey and Christine Chandler (both Democrats).
    All of the judicial candidates listed above are Democrats; there is no Republican opposition.  Hence, the winner in each division will become the only candidate for the November election.

    The Democrat who wins the primary election for House District 43 will face the Republican candidate Lisa Shin in November.

    Before the November 6 general election, the League will hold a round of forums for all of the candidates on the November ballot.  

  • Author presentation on chronic pain and posture set for May 17

    Former long-time Los Alamos resident Jessica Kisiel will give a free presentation at 7 p.m. May 17 at Mesa Public Library.

    Her talk: “Healing Chronic Pain Through Alignment,” documents her journey from elite athletics to being a chronic pain patient and back to competitive sports.

    Kisiel’s story, and those of several clients she helped return to an active lifestyle, is documented in her recently published book, “Winning the Injury Game” (https://thepfathlete.com/book/).

    She is excited to share her insights about healing and message of hope for rising above chronic pain with the community that supported her during her recovery.

    Kisiel overcame severe hip osteoarthritis, three knee surgeries and debilitating back and neck pain through the alignment and training strategies she describes in her new book.

    The book is written for the active person living with chronic pain that wants to keep moving and playing sports. It is for someone who has tried the standard approaches to healing but still hurts and is open to an alternative approach.

    The book is organized into three sections. Section 1 addresses the mental and emotional side of injuries, section 2 describes the link between physical alignment and pain, and section 3 explores an approach to training that respects the body.

  • Cold War Patriots to host town hall meetings

    Cold War Patriots (CWP), a community resource organization that is the nation’s strongest and most sustained voice advocating for worker benefits, will host free town hall meetings for nuclear weapons and uranium workers in New Mexico Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2 p.m. each day.

    With a new format this year, CWP is making it easier for workers to get the specific information they need about the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

    The morning sessions, starting at 10 a.m. will be customized for people who have already applied for EEOICPA benefits and have either been awarded a U.S. Department of Labor white medical benefits card or have a pending claim.

    The 2 p.m. afternoon sessions are for workers who haven’t yet applied for their benefits or those who have applied but whose claims have been denied. There is no new information for post 1971 uranium miners at this time. The afternoon session participants will learn:

    • If they qualify for up to $400,000 in monetary compensation and free healthcare

    • How to apply for benefits

    • What benefits are included

    • How to reopen denied claims

  • Why I care about education and health care

    BY PETE SHEEHEY
    Los Alamos County Councilor, Democratic candidate for NM House of Representatives, Dist. 43

    I have written about the importance of scientists like myself playing a role in government. I will work to make sure that facts and sound science are included in lawmaking. I was honored recently that the National Education Association-New Mexico has recommended my candidacy, because I also feel strongly that good affordable public education and health care for all are the keys to a strong society and economy.

    My life experience has taught me this. I grew up in a working class family. My parents were well-read, intelligent people, but were only able to get a year or two of college because of the Great Depression and World War II. From an early age, they took my sisters and me to the public library and encouraged our curiosity, so we looked forward to starting school.

    We had access to good affordable public education, and this served us well. One sister became a librarian, the other an English and Creative Writing teacher.  

  • Los Alamos Middle School’s ‘D’ Grade from an Education Czar

    BY LISA SHIN
    Republican candidate for NM House of Representatives, Dist. 43

    The Los Alamos Public Schools rank among the best in our State, if not our Nation, when it comes to student reading and math proficiency. This, of course, is the natural result of our highly skilled and educated workforce.

    Los Alamos has one of the country’s highest concentrations of Ph.D.s. Our community puts a high priority on education, and it shows. So why then, did our Middle School, receive a D grade last year? At the League of Women Voters’ event earlier this month, Dr. Kurt Steinhaus explained. Even though our students demonstrated a high 83 percent academic proficiency, it was down from a 85% proficiency the previous year. Another school in New Mexico demonstrated a 14 percent proficiency, but received an “A” grade because it was up from a 7 percent proficiency the previous year. A school in Artesia was a National Blue Ribbon School one year, a prestigious designation for high achievement, but received a D grade.