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Today's News

  • Representative defends need for Holtec project

    On the same day Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham sent a letter to the Department of Energy coming out against a proposed interim nuclear waste storage facility for southern New Mexico, John Heaton was in Española telling the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities on why the state needs the facility. 

    Heaton, the vice president of the Eddy-Lea Energy Alliance, spoke to the coalition Friday. He couldn’t understand why the governor and others are against the project. 

    Heaton helped bring the project to the region through a 1,000-acre land purchase. 

    He told the Los Alamos Monitor after the meeting that it doesn’t make sense that a few people would be willing to thwart economic development in a region that desperately needs it. 

    “The governor can’t keep beating this stuff up,” Heaton said. “We’re a nuclear state. We have two national laboratories; we got the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, we got one of the few nuclear engineering programs in the United States… I mean, my goodness. 

  • Labs OK new high- level waste definition

    A proposal by the Department of Energy released June 5 to reinterpret the definition of high-level radioactive waste has gained the support of six national DOE laboratories, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The DOE proposed revising the interpretation of high-level radioactive waste to a definition that is risk-based and “consistent with the radiological characteristics of the waste and the ability to safely isolate the waste from the human environment,” the group of laboratory directors wrote in a position paper March 25.

    The former definition was based on the waste source, instead of its potential risk.

    “The proposal would shift the definition from a source-based definition to a risk-based interpretation consistent with the radiological characteristics of the waste,” according to the letter.

    The other national laboratory directors who support the new definition include directors of the Savannah River National Laboratory in South Carolina, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington state, the Idaho National Laboratory, the Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.

  • LAPD main dispatch line back in service

    The Los Alamos Police Department reported Wednesday morning that its main non-emergency dispatch line, 662-8222, is now working. The line had been down since Monday morning. Residents no longer have to use the alternative 662-8220 number. For emergencies, call 911.

  • Most New Mexicans are Real ID-compliant as deadline looms

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico now has 1 million residents with driver's licenses or identification cards that comply with tougher federal ID requirements that will take effect in 2020.

    Officials with the state Taxation and Revenue Department say people have just over a year to meet the deadline under the Real ID Act, which was passed in 2005 to strengthen rules for identification for airline flights and at federal facilities such as military bases.

    With the one-millionth license issued last week, about 70 percent of New Mexico licenses and identification cards now carry the gold star that marks them as being Real ID-compliant.

    New Mexico began issuing the credentials in November 2016 as part of a two-tier system that also allows for IDs that do not meet the tougher standards to be issued.
     

  • Governor sues Trump administration over immigrant drop-offs, federal funding

    Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and the City of Albuquerque filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in New Mexico Monday in an attempt to stop President Trump’s administration from releasing immigrants into the state’s borderland area.

    The lawsuit claims the federal government did not inform or ask for input from the affected communities and asks the court to issue a preliminary and permanent injunction of the abandonment of government's safe release policy.

    The complaint also seeks assistance for asylum-seeking immigrants and families, and asks the court to require the federal government pay the state and Albuquerque back for all costs related to caring for the immigrants released by the federal government.

    The lawsuit is the first of its kind by a state, according to the Associated Press. It resembles a suit by San Diego County in April also challenging the cancellation of an immigration program that helped migrants with phone calls and other travel logistics as they sought out final destinations throughout the United States. Now asylum seeking migrants typically are released almost immediately.

    The U.S. Justice Department declined to comment to the AP on the lawsuit.

  • Police Beat 6-9-19

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, server a court summons, or issued a citation.

    May 30
    9:23 a.m. – Elias Jon Lovato, 48, of Española, was booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center on a District Court warrant. Suspect is still in custody.

    4:04 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to an aggravated assault at Ashley Pond that turned out to be unfounded.

    May 31
    2:44 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to an argument between two juveniles.

    9 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to a case of simple battery and disorderly conduct at the teen center.

    June 1
    12 a.m. – Kyle Vincent Zocco, 21, of Rochester, was booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center for drug possession, distribution of a controlled substance and possess of marijuana over eight ounces. Suspect is still in custody.

    June 2

  • Police Beat 6-9-19

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, server a court summons, or issued a citation.

    May 30
    9:23 a.m. – Elias Jon Lovato, 48, of Española, was booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center on a District Court warrant. Suspect is still in custody.

    4:04 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to an aggravated assault at Ashley Pond that turned out to be unfounded.

    May 31
    2:44 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to an argument between two juveniles.

    9 p.m. – Los Alamos police responded to a case of simple battery and disorderly conduct at the teen center.

    June 1
    12 a.m. – Kyle Vincent Zocco, 21, of Rochester, was booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center for drug possession, distribution of a controlled substance and possess of marijuana over eight ounces. Suspect is still in custody.

    June 2

  • Musical Tuesdays
  • Loope to appear in court Wednesday

    A Los Alamos woman who has had multiple assault charges against her in Los Alamos County is due in court Wednesday on a probation violation she committed in May.

    If found guilty, Marion Loope, 36, of Los Alamos, could spend up to a year and three months in jail for an assault she committed April 15, 2018.

    Loope, remains in custody for the April case, even though magistrate court gave her probation for the probation violation pending the status hearing Wednesday in Los Alamos District Court.

    The probation violation stems from her allegedly punching a woman in the face on her drive home from a doctor’s appointment May 9.

    Up until that time, Loope was on probation for a battery charge she committed against a woman on April 15, 2018.

    In that case, she was found not guilty on the charge of alleged aggravated assault against a household member with a deadly weapon.

    However, she was convicted for battery against a household member and sentenced to supervised probation until May 2020.

    Since her arrest May 9, Loope has been in custody in the Los Alamos County Detention Center until a hearing before Los Alamos District Judge Jason Lidyard June 12.

  • NMED mulls move of oversight bureau

    The New Mexico Environment Department Department of Energy Oversight Bureau may move its oversight bureau from Los Alamos to Santa Fe.

    News of the proposed move has some nuclear watchdog groups concerned.

    According to NMED’s Public information officer, Maddy Hayden, the move is to better ensure compliance at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other federal facilities the NMED oversees.

    The move was also about conducting oversight in better, more modern facilities, she said.

    “This contemplated relocation to a more modern facility will include a new and innovative laboratory,” Hayden said.

    Environmental, nuclear safety groups Nuclear Watch and Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety expressed concern over the move.

    Concerned Citizens Spokeswoman Joni Arends said the oversight bureau’s physical presence in Los Alamos was important.