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Today's News

  • Trump decides to exit nuclear accord with Iran

    By CATHERINE LUCEY and JOSH LEDERMAN, Associated Press

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the landmark nuclear accord with Iran on Tuesday, abruptly restoring harsh sanctions in the most consequential foreign policy action of his presidency. He declared he was making the world safer, but he also deepened his isolation on the world stage and revived doubts about American credibility.

    The 2015 agreement, which was negotiated by the Obama administration and included Germany, France and Britain, had lifted most U.S. and international economic sanctions against Iran. In exchange, Iran agreed to restrictions on its nuclear program, making it impossible to produce a bomb and establishing rigorous inspections.

    But Trump, a severe critic of the deal dating back to his presidential campaign, said in a televised address from the White House that it was "defective at its core."

    U.S. allies in Europe had tried to keep him in and lamented his move to abandon it. Iran's leader ominously warned his country might "start enriching uranium more than before."

    The sanctions seek to punish Iran for its nuclear program by limiting its ability to sell oil or do business overseas, affecting a wide range of Iranian economic sectors and individuals.

  • Pet of the Week 5-6-18

    If you meet Sid, a Bombay-American Shorthair cat at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, you have to keep a secret from him. He thinks he’s a black panther.

    But in reality, Sid is like most cats at the animal shelter – very friendly and in desperate need of a forever home.
    He’s a bit of a big boy, too, for a 9-month old.

    Another thing people should know about him is that he’s never really had a forever home. Los Alamos County Shelter volunteers received him from the Animal Welfare Coalition of Northeastern New Mexico. Sid had been at the coalition shelter from the age of 7 weeks old.

    It’s a bit of a mystery too, since volunteers say he’s very friendly toward humans (including children), other cats and dogs.

    Sid likes to sleep in small spaces. Sid has been micro chipped, and has been vaccinated and is disease free.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • Primary candidate forum features House District 43 and judges May 9

    The Los Alamos League of Women Voters invites the public to the final candidate forum to introduce candidates who have opposition in the June 5 primary election.

    The forum is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 9 at Fuller Lodge.

    Come to the forum on Wednesday, May 9, at Fuller Lodge. Refreshments and conversation with the candidates will begin at 6:30 p.m.

    Candidates expected to attend this forum will be:

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 2: Gregory S. Shaffer, Donna M. Bevacqua-Young, Maria E. Sanchez-Gagne, and Jerry A. Archuleta (all Democrats);

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 5:  Jason Lidyard and Matthew Jackson (both Democrats)

    • New Mexico House of Representatives, District 43: Pete Sheehey and Christine Chandler (both Democrats).
    All of the judicial candidates listed above are Democrats; there is no Republican opposition.  Hence, the winner in each division will become the only candidate for the November election.

    The Democrat who wins the primary election for House District 43 will face the Republican candidate Lisa Shin in November.

    Before the November 6 general election, the League will hold a round of forums for all of the candidates on the November ballot.  

  • Author presentation on chronic pain and posture set for May 17

    Former long-time Los Alamos resident Jessica Kisiel will give a free presentation at 7 p.m. May 17 at Mesa Public Library.

    Her talk: “Healing Chronic Pain Through Alignment,” documents her journey from elite athletics to being a chronic pain patient and back to competitive sports.

    Kisiel’s story, and those of several clients she helped return to an active lifestyle, is documented in her recently published book, “Winning the Injury Game” (https://thepfathlete.com/book/).

    She is excited to share her insights about healing and message of hope for rising above chronic pain with the community that supported her during her recovery.

    Kisiel overcame severe hip osteoarthritis, three knee surgeries and debilitating back and neck pain through the alignment and training strategies she describes in her new book.

    The book is written for the active person living with chronic pain that wants to keep moving and playing sports. It is for someone who has tried the standard approaches to healing but still hurts and is open to an alternative approach.

    The book is organized into three sections. Section 1 addresses the mental and emotional side of injuries, section 2 describes the link between physical alignment and pain, and section 3 explores an approach to training that respects the body.

  • Cold War Patriots to host town hall meetings

    Cold War Patriots (CWP), a community resource organization that is the nation’s strongest and most sustained voice advocating for worker benefits, will host free town hall meetings for nuclear weapons and uranium workers in New Mexico Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2 p.m. each day.

    With a new format this year, CWP is making it easier for workers to get the specific information they need about the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

    The morning sessions, starting at 10 a.m. will be customized for people who have already applied for EEOICPA benefits and have either been awarded a U.S. Department of Labor white medical benefits card or have a pending claim.

    The 2 p.m. afternoon sessions are for workers who haven’t yet applied for their benefits or those who have applied but whose claims have been denied. There is no new information for post 1971 uranium miners at this time. The afternoon session participants will learn:

    • If they qualify for up to $400,000 in monetary compensation and free healthcare

    • How to apply for benefits

    • What benefits are included

    • How to reopen denied claims

  • Why I care about education and health care

    BY PETE SHEEHEY
    Los Alamos County Councilor, Democratic candidate for NM House of Representatives, Dist. 43

    I have written about the importance of scientists like myself playing a role in government. I will work to make sure that facts and sound science are included in lawmaking. I was honored recently that the National Education Association-New Mexico has recommended my candidacy, because I also feel strongly that good affordable public education and health care for all are the keys to a strong society and economy.

    My life experience has taught me this. I grew up in a working class family. My parents were well-read, intelligent people, but were only able to get a year or two of college because of the Great Depression and World War II. From an early age, they took my sisters and me to the public library and encouraged our curiosity, so we looked forward to starting school.

    We had access to good affordable public education, and this served us well. One sister became a librarian, the other an English and Creative Writing teacher.  

  • Los Alamos Middle School’s ‘D’ Grade from an Education Czar

    BY LISA SHIN
    Republican candidate for NM House of Representatives, Dist. 43

    The Los Alamos Public Schools rank among the best in our State, if not our Nation, when it comes to student reading and math proficiency. This, of course, is the natural result of our highly skilled and educated workforce.

    Los Alamos has one of the country’s highest concentrations of Ph.D.s. Our community puts a high priority on education, and it shows. So why then, did our Middle School, receive a D grade last year? At the League of Women Voters’ event earlier this month, Dr. Kurt Steinhaus explained. Even though our students demonstrated a high 83 percent academic proficiency, it was down from a 85% proficiency the previous year. Another school in New Mexico demonstrated a 14 percent proficiency, but received an “A” grade because it was up from a 7 percent proficiency the previous year. A school in Artesia was a National Blue Ribbon School one year, a prestigious designation for high achievement, but received a D grade.

  • Are new corporations  bigger bad wolves?

    The name “Big Bad Wolf” rings scary alarms in voters’ heads. The left and the right reply to fears with fears about big corporations, a big army, big unions, big government and big donors to big campaigns. Metaphors of politics picture Big Bad Wolves dressed in sheep’s clothing or lying in Grandma’s bed. Small wonder that big corporations incite voters to cry, “Grandma, what big teeth you have.”

    Big corporations indeed need a thorough look to figure them out. Big companies have grown through the centuries and brought society hoped-for benefits and unwanted side effects.

    The first Industrial Revolution began in the 1760s in Britain, evolved through the 1840s and came later to the US.

    Many histories come to mind. People produced copper, steel, oil and aluminum and, with them, crafted faster reapers, tractors, cars, trucks and airplanes, later on with radios in them and radars at airports. With these products, people grew and shipped better produce at good prices for more people. Jobs grew. Corporations grew – Big Farming, Big Finance, Big Pharma.

  • Trump to announce decision on Iran nuclear deal on Tuesday

    By ZEKE MILLER and CATHERINE LUCEY, Associated Press

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is set to reveal his decision on whether to keep the U.S. in the Iran deal on Tuesday, a move that could determine the fate of 2015 agreement that froze Iran's nuclear program.

    The announcement is set to cap more than a year of deliberation and negotiation that has at time pitted Trump against some of his closest aides and key American allies. Trump is facing a self-imposed May 12 deadline over whether to uphold the 2015 nuclear agreement, which he long has criticized. The president has signaled he will pull out of the pact by the deadline unless it is revised, but he faces intense pressure from European allies not to do so.

    "I will be announcing my decision on the Iran Deal tomorrow from the White House at 2:00pm," Trump tweeted Monday.

    The president has been the subject of an intense lobbying effort by American allies to maintain the agreement, with British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson making a last-ditch appeal to the administration in a visit to Washington this week. European leaders say that they are open to negotiating a side agreement with Iran, but the existing framework must remain untouched for that to happen.

  • Atomic City Update: Adaptive Sports Program helps make dreams come true

    This week, I had the privilege of spending some time with the Adaptive Sports Program of New Mexico as they invited individuals with disabilities from Aspen Elementary School to the YMCA to have some fun at the climbing wall. 

    For many of these kids, having access to the harness chair attached to the wall is the only way they will be able to climb up and experience that type of adrenaline rush, and it is amazing to see them experience that. 

    For more than two hours, those kids got to have an amazing time, either going up the wall in the chair, or on their own with the help of one of the amazing leaders. Douglas Lewis, Jason Cline and Camille Romero were on hand Tuesday morning to help the kids in any way they could. It is clear that this is a life passion for all of them, and they were having just as much fun as the kids were having.