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Today's News

  • Road closure on Loma Del Escolar starts Monday

    Starting on Monday, TLC Plumbing, hired by Bradbury Stamm Construction, will close Loma Del Escolar from 42 to 48 Loma Del Escolar near Barranca Mesa Elementary.

    Local traffic will be able to access their homes.

    There will be a detour at the corner of Loma Del Escolar and Barranca Road both east and west sides.

    The closure is required in order to tap into a sewer manhole located between 42 and 48 Loma Del Escolar. Weather permitting, the work is expected to be completed by July 3.

    Drivers should watch for directional and closure signs.

    For more information, contact Perry Muller, project superintendent, at 505-415-2022, or email him at pmuller@bradburystamm.com.

  • Work starts on LAHS practice field

    It may look like a safe place to practice, but the Los Alamos High School practice field is filled with holes and bare patches. These unsafe conditions will be remedied.

    Los Alamos Public Schools has contracted with Los Alamos Landscaping & More, LLC for work on this field adjacent to Griffith Gym. The scope of work will include top dressing, reseeding and installing sod in areas of the field that are safety concerns, according to Tommy Castillo, director of facilities.

    “Over the past several years, erosion and gophers have created uneven areas on the field,” said Castillo.  “This landscaping work will make the field safer for our students.”

    The project is scheduled to take 75 days or longer.

  • WR Senior Center to host free estate planning presentation Thursday

    The term, “estate planning,” feels slightly ominous to some, but local attorney Shay Burns Kendricks hopes to make it easier with a free presentation at the White Rock Senior Center.

    The multi-faceted program will be Thursday starting at 12:30 p.m. and continuing until 2 p.m. for those that need to arrive later. 

    The program will be kicked off with a light-hearted theater production and comedy, by local playwright Robert Benjamin.

    The approximately 15-minute theatrical event is titled, “Ultimate Precision.” This short play is a hilarious look at obituaries and estate loaning, just prior to a serious topic that can often feel overwhelming.

    “Everyone should put some basic planning in place for the possibility of incapacity and in the event of their death,” said Burns Kendricks. “It gives the person creating the documents peace of mind and helps your friends and family deal with the legal issues that arise, during a period of incapacity or when you eventually die.”

  • Downtown Creative Crawl set for Friday

    The Los Alamos Creative District is teaming up with local organizations to host the second Downtown Creative Crawl set for Friday.

    The Downtown Creative Crawl will start at the Los Alamos Nature Center from 3-4 p.m. Come pet a snake or ask questions about the animal exhibits with a member of the critter team. Critters are fed and available to be held.

    The crawl will then move on to the Pride Festival from 4-7 p.m. The Pride Festival is presented by Friends of Los Alamos Pride and is a family-friendly festival celebrating the LGBTQ+ community. The theme of this year’s festival is

    “Be Your Own Hero” and it should be full of heroic activities and educational opportunities for all ages including performance and creative outlets.

    From 4-6 p.m., the Creative Crawl will move to Fuller Lodge, then onto the Fuller Lodge Art Center for the opening reception of the “MapMaker” exhibit from 5-7 p.m. Stop by the Pajarito Room in Fuller Lodge to enjoy a collection of John Ramsay’s historic maps presented by the Los Alamos Historical Society.

    Check out this new exhibit focused on maps, directions, and a perception of the world. Meet the artists, enjoy refreshments, and listen to live Bluegrass band, Quatro! The reception is free.

  • Medical pot program expands with more changes to come

    When it comes to pain, there are two schools of thought: Suck it up or seek relief.

    The second school, seeking relief, is one driver in opioid addiction. Medical cannabis offers an avenue to both pain and opioid addiction.

    Last week, when the state Department of Health added opioid use disorder to the list of qualifying conditions to receive medical cannabis, it was less a sudden stroke of enlightenment and more a response to public outcry and building pressure that found its voice in a legislative task force.

    Expect more big changes.

    In 2018, the Legislature created a task force to look into issues of supply and demand in the medical cannabis program and make recommendations. The task force found that the state’s artificial limits on all aspects of the program denied relief to some patients, increased costs, and depressed supply. 

  • Medical pot program expands with more changes to come

    When it comes to pain, there are two schools of thought: Suck it up or seek relief.

    The second school, seeking relief, is one driver in opioid addiction. Medical cannabis offers an avenue to both pain and opioid addiction.

    Last week, when the state Department of Health added opioid use disorder to the list of qualifying conditions to receive medical cannabis, it was less a sudden stroke of enlightenment and more a response to public outcry and building pressure that found its voice in a legislative task force.

    Expect more big changes.

    In 2018, the Legislature created a task force to look into issues of supply and demand in the medical cannabis program and make recommendations. The task force found that the state’s artificial limits on all aspects of the program denied relief to some patients, increased costs, and depressed supply. 

  • The New Mexico Legislature is broken

    By Vernon Kerr

    We, the sap citizens, have been scammed. Will Harrison, a columnist in the past (1970s), always referred to us as sap citizens and showed where we had been taken by the state government.

    I recall the many times he found out our shortcomings, but the one we are now experiencing is the slickest of them all. In the 2019 legislature, Senate Bill 489, the Energy Transition Act, was touted as a great victory for the environmentalists as a way to control “climate change”. A misnomer if there ever was one as it is applied as an environmental problem. Climate has been changing for millions and billions of years and has never been controlled by man. 

    Why do the Democrat progressives think they have the supernatural power of God and that “their” legislation can alter the nature of the climate. They worry that carbon dioxide injected into the atmosphere will accumulate and act as a blanket on the earth that will boost temperatures and fry us. 

  • Civil rights group seeks probe of Hispanic hiring at UNM

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The New Mexico chapter of the oldest Hispanic civil rights group in the U.S. is calling on state and federal authorities to investigate hiring practices at the University of New Mexico.

    At its statewide convention in Albuquerque on Saturday, the New Mexico League of United Latin American Citizens endorsed a resolution calling on the state attorney general, state auditor and U.S. Justice Department to look into how the university is hiring administrators. Advocates said those hiring practices discriminated against Hispanics, especially those from New Mexico

    Executive Director Ralph Arellanes said university President Garnett Stokes did not follow through on promises to include Latinos on search committees for key positions.

    “LULAC and many Hispano organizations across New Mexico are outraged by the continued abuse of power, discrimination, mistreatment and disenfranchisement,” Arellanes said. “This has been a longstanding problem with the University of New Mexico in the past and it has only grown and expanded under the leadership of (Stokes).”

    University spokeswoman Cinnamon Blair said the school was aware of the resolution.

  • LAHS grad opens new barbershop

    BY ISAAC FASON

    The Los Alamos Monitor

    Los Alamos High School Alumni Joe Abeyta hosted an art pop-up at the soft opening of his new barbershop Friday night. 

    Abeyta gave EDo’s Barber Shop its unique name to honor the area where it is located.

    “I named the shop EDo’s because it is conveniently located in Albuquerque’s Historic Huning Highland Neighborhood, also known as East Downtown or EDo! I also really like the way it sounds,” Abeyta said. “I think it might be one of Albuquerque’s most unique neighborhoods and I’m really excited to be a part of the community now.”

    Abeyta’s four siblings -- Adrian, Esteban, Elena and Anna -- also attended Los Alamos High School, and helped push Abeyta towards this career. 

    “I started cutting hair over 10 years ago when I was in middle school. And the only reason why I started doing it was because Adrian would force me to cut his hair. I would borrow my grandpa’s clippers and practice on him,” Abeyta said.

  • New brewpub set to open in Los Alamos

    A new brew pub is expected to open in downtown Los Alamos this summer.

    Boese Bros Brewpub, located inside the old UnQuarked Wine Room location at 145 Central Park Square, is beginning to take shape. 

    The Boese Brothers have two locations in Albuquerque. One is in Northeast Heights. Brothers Sam and George Boese finished construction on the taproom and opened the location in November 2018. This was the brothers’ second location.

    The original location is in southwest Albuquerque. 

    The brothers also have a sister taproom with New Mexico Hard Cider in Santa Fe called Desert Dogs Brewery and Cidery.

    At the NE Heights brewpub, they serve 12 beer and cider taps and sandwiches. 

    The other location offers beer and cider also, and serve three different types of panini sandwiches, including turkey and green chile, a cubano and a three-cheese grilled cheese. They also offer Frito pie and tacos. 

    The Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce sent out a heads-up Tuesday saying the Boese Brothers Brewpub could be up and running by July.