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Today's News

  • UNM-LA students celebrate 37th graduation

    Graduates attending the 37th Annual Graduation Convocation of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos had waited a long time to finally walk across the stage and receive their diploma.

    So delaying the start of the ceremony a few more minutes was not a problem, especially when the graduates learned the reason behind the delay.

    As visitors and participants were filing in to the ceremony held at Crossroads Bible Church on East Road, one of the graduates, Annalynn Martinez, was struck by a car in front of the church and was transported to Los Alamos Medical Center, where she was treated and released later that night.

    After the short delay the ceremony began with the presentation of the colors by the Los Alamos High School Navy Junior ROTC and the singing of the National Anthem by Grace Willerton and Joy Reynolds.

    Dr. Cynthia J. Rooney, the chief executive officer of UNM-LA, welcomed everyone with brief opening comments.

    In her comments, Rooney said UNM-LA’s enrollment this semester was 1,151, which she said is quite an achievement “at a time when enrollment numbers are down” across the country. She also noted that over 100 students earned degrees this year at the school.

  • Pig and Fig makes a move

    Saturday morning was the start of Pig and Fig restaurant’s official first day at its new location, but customers wouldn’t even know it judging by the crowds that came for breakfast. 

     

    It seems customers have not skipped a beat in finding the Pig and Fig’s new location at 11 Sherwood Blvd. 

    “White Rock has been extremely loyal,” Executive Chef and owner Laura Crucet said. “They have been waiting with bated breath for us to open.” Crucet and her staff were ready, too. 

    Disappearing rapidly off a counter were the same luscious, homemade, French style cakes, pies tarts and pastries customers have come to expect from the Pig and Fig, and coming from their new bigger kitchen were numerous plates of quiches and omelets cooked to order. 

    “We have the best staff,” Crucet said. “We have the best restaurant staff in New Mexico, I’m convinced of it.”  

  • NNSA’s pit decision restores confidence in local economy

    Local and laboratory officials expressed optimism and relief following the decision by the National Nuclear Security Administration to include the Los Alamos National Laboratory in its plutonium pit manufacturing program.

    An internal memo from Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Terry Wallace Jr. to employees Thursday and obtained by the Los Alamos Monitor indicated the lab is looking forward to a brighter future.

    “Let me be clear about how I interpret this decision: I believe NNSA has given the Laboratory a big vote of confidence today,” Wallace wrote to employees. “They are investing an additional $3 billion in new mission space, which includes people, infrastructure, and equipment. This is a significant opportunity to continue contributing to the nation’s security by drawing on our unique expertise in plutonium science.”

    Wallace also said the NNSA’s vote of confidence means LANL will remain at the center of plutonium pit manufacturing for years to come as it helps the Savannah River Site to develop it’s own plutonium pit manufacturing facility and workforce.

  • New Mexico Dem official bans 'Vote or Die' T-shirt sales

    By RUSSELL CONTRERAS, Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The Democratic chair of New Mexico's largest county has ordered a voting rights group not to sell its "Vote or Die" T-shirt at sponsor events because it's "offensive" and "a blatant threat."

    Democratic Party of Bernalillo County chair Bill Peifer told The Associated Press in an email late Monday that a shirt being sold by Dave Mulryan of Everybody Votes also is abhorrent to gun owners and rural New Mexico residents — voters New Mexico Democrats are seeking to win over.

    "The first, quite simply put, is that it's a very negative message. We always have a difficult time in getting out the vote," Peifer said. "We want the act of voting to be associated with good things happening . . . a positive message."

    Mulryan said in a statement the group believes there is nothing wrong with the shirt.

    "Everybody Votes will continue to offer the "Vote or Die," t-shirt for sale," Mulryan said. "We believe in the message, and we believe in our right to sell it."

  • LA schools to get pre-K funds

    The Los Alamos School District found out Thursday it is one of 11 districts that will receive first-time funding for the state of New Mexico’s pre-K program.

    The amount of that funding was to be announced on Friday, but school officials had not yet seen those numbers posted by press time.

    New Mexico is adding an additional $10 million to the program for the 2018-19 school year, bringing the program to 11 school districts for the first time.

    “We’re very pleased to have this opportunity to host the first New Mexico preschool program beginning next year,” said Karla Crane, the coordinator of student services for the Los Alamos School District. “We won’t know all the details about how much we’re going to be able to do until we see how much money we’ve been awarded, whether it’s going to be one half day, two half days, things like that. We just don’t have the answers to those questions until we find out that amount. As we receive more information on the specifics we’ll be releasing those details to the public.”

    The state Public Education Department’s announcement means the opening of more than 1,500 additional pre-K spots to serve potentially about 6,800 students statewide.

  • Flower Girl
  • Rules for predatory lenders must reflect letter, spirit of law

    An elderly woman got a small loan from a storefront lender and couldn’t understand why she could never manage to pay off the loan even though she made payments.

    Leonard Gorman, executive director of the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission, explained the basics of principal and interest and renewal language in the loan agreement. Once she understood, she cried inconsolably.

    Last year, when the Legislature finally reformed laws governing storefront lenders – also called predatory lenders or payday lenders – there was a sense of accomplishment that they had dispatched a nagging problem after years of complaints.

    A recent hearing in Gallup made it clear there’s still work to do. Gorman blamed the lenders’ deliberately confusing communications for financial burdens on Navajos, but the small lenders trap Indian and non-Indian people alike.

    This is one reason New Mexico is poor. Thousands of people can’t get out from under these debts with their spiraling interest rates, so they don’t participate fully in the economy.

  • Community Calendar 5-25-18

    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: National Parks Adventure
at 2 p.m. at the Nature center. Watch the most critically acclaimed giant screen film of the year on our new planetarium projector. This film is brought to Los Alamos by our sponsors: CB Fox, Metzger’s Hardware, and the Delle Foundation with additional funding from the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    White Rock Artist Market from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the White Rock Visitor Center, 15 NM 4, in White Rock.
    SUNDAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.
    MONDAY
    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present a commemorative Memorial Day Concert at 1 p.m. Monday on the lawn at Fuller Lodge. Patriotic selections, as well as fun tunes and medleys for the entire family, will performed. Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch and enjoy some great music.

  • Memorial Day Events

    LA Community Winds to host concert

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present a commemorative Memorial Day Concert at 1 p.m. Monday on the lawn at Fuller Lodge.
    Patriotic selections, as well as fun tunes and medleys for the entire family, will performed. Bring a blanket and a picnic lunch and enjoy some great music.
    Please note that this is a change from the original posted time and place.

    Memorial Day Ceremony set for Monday

    The community is invited to the Memorial Day Celebration to be held at 11 a.m. Monday at the Guaje Pines Cemetery in Los Alamos.
    A lunch will follow the ceremony at the American Legion Post 90 at 1325 Trinity Drive.

  • The highest-paid CEOs by state

    By The Associated Press

    Here are the top-paid CEOs by state for 2017, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm.

    The survey considered only publicly traded companies with more than $1 billion in revenue that filed their proxy statements with federal regulators between Jan. 1 and April 30. Not every state had a publicly traded company headquartered there that was large enough to be included. The survey includes only CEOs who have been in place for at least two years, but it does not limit the survey to companies in the S&P 500, as the AP's general compensation study does.

    To calculate CEO pay, Equilar adds salary, bonus, stock awards, stock option awards, deferred compensation and other components that include benefits and perks. For some companies, big raises can occur when CEOs get a stock grant in one year as part of a multi-year grant.

    The typical CEO in the Standard & Poor's 500 index made $11.7 million last year.
    ___

    Alabama: O. B. Grayson Hall Jr., Regions Financial, $9.4 million (Hall is stepping down in July.)

    Arkansas: C. Douglas McMillon, Walmart, $22.8 million

    Arizona: Richard C. Adkerson, Freeport-McMoRan, $16.2 million

    California: Michael Rapino , Live Nation Entertainment, $70.6 million