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Today's News

  • Administration vows to veto CMRR funding

    The White House released a statement of administrative policy regarding the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2013.

    The administration made 18 objections to the defense bill proposed by the Senate Armed Services Committee and the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility project is listed seventh on the list.

    The SASC, despite the administration decision to defer the LANL project for five years, put in $150 million in funding.

    The administration said it agrees with numerous provisions of the act, but if it makes its way to the president in its present form, the bill would get vetoed.

    The statement read: “the Administration strongly objects to section 3111, which would require construction of the CMRR facility to begin in 2013. The Departments of Defense and Energy agree that, in light of today’s fiscal environment, CMRR can be deferred for at least five years, and funds reallocated to support higher priority nuclear weapons goals.

  • Raw: Inauguration in Mexico Sparks Violence

    Violence broke out in Mexico City on Saturday as protesters took to the streets to oppose the inauguration of incoming president Enrique Pena Nieto and the return of his Institutional Revolutionary Party.

  • Update 12-02-12

    Book Sale

    Scholastic books are for sale at The Family YMCA from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily through Dec. 6. The public is welcome to come to the Y and shop. Partial proceeds will benefit the Y’s annual campaign that supports scholarships for those needing financial assistance.

    Kiwanis meeting

    Kiwanis meets each Tuesday, noon to 1 p.m., at the Masonic Temple, on Sage, near the intersection of 15th and Canyon. On Tuesday, Linda Deck, director of the Bradbury Science Museum, will speak on the current displays at the museum.

    Sponsor a family

    The Family YMCA is sponsoring four families for the holidays and welcomes the community to participate by taking part in the Giving Tree. For more information call the Y at 662-3100.

    DWI council

    The Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council will meet at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 11 at the Los Alamos Police Department Training Room, 2500 Trinity Dr., Suite A.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

     

  • State tops on death spiral list

    The most recent economic ranking to wander through here paints New Mexico harshly. Certainly the words are blunter than usual. We lead a group of eleven states called “death spiral states” by Forbes.com. http://forbes.com/sites/baldwin/2012/11/25/do-you-live-in-a-death-spiral...
    “Death spiral” is harsh. So is the “taker/maker” distinction employed in the post by staffer William Baldwin, who says, “A taker is someone who draws money from (state or local) government, as an employee, pensioner or welfare recipient. A maker is someone gainfully employed in the private sector.” To make the spiral list, a state needs more takers than makers and to be in the lower half of a credit analysis by Conning & Co., a money manager that measures risk in insurance company portfolios.
    New Mexico has the highest taker / maker ratio at 1.53. Mississippi is second. There it is. We’re in excusive company. California, New York and Illinois are among the eleven. The future is “a rising tax burden, deteriorating state finances and an exodus of employers,” Baldwin says.

  • The quest for perfection

    New Mexico businesses that want help becoming more efficient frequently call on the New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership — a nonprofit agency of the U.S. Commerce Department that helps small and mid-sized U.S. businesses create and preserve jobs, become more profitable and save time and money. In New Mexico, where most businesses are small, MEP services are used by doctors’ offices, machine shops, small farms and agricultural operations, and businesses that serve the oil and gas industry.
    MEP uses multiple techniques to help businesses increase profits by standardizing production and administration to provide continuous improvement that eliminates waste and strives for perfection.
    Lean manufacturing theory recognizes that there will always be some degree of product variation but it seeks to minimize aberrations that result in added expenses when products must be discarded or returned to the production line for repair or reassembly. Motorola, in its drive toward perfection in 1986, introduced an idea called Six Sigma based on the letter in the Greek alphabet used to measure mathematical variations from a standard. Motorola aspired to refine its manufacturing process to a sigma rating of six, meaning that 99.99966 percent of its products would have zero defects.

  • Andrew and Mousie 12-02-12
  • Word on the Street 12-02-12

    Teen Pulse staff member Robert Naffziger asked students, “Did you go shopping on Black Friday?”

  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 12-02-12

    • Monday: Birthday board
    • Tuesday: Yarn holiday craft
    • Wednesday:  
    Movies and munchies
    • Thursday: Snow swabs
    • Friday: Peppermint ornament

    Memberships are free and open to all in third through eighth grade.
    The White Rock Youth Activity Center is at 10 Sherwood Blvd., 672-1565. The Los Alamos Youth Activity  Center is at 475 20th St., 662-9412.

  • Jack White makes a break

    Break-ups are never an easy thing to handle, especially if the people breaking up are in a band together.
    Depending on the popularity of the band, individual members may have a hard time starting new endeavors.
    None have been more successful than Ozzy Osbourne, who crafted his own dark image, after getting kicked out of Black Sabbath; and John Lennon, who rose to immortal status with solo albums such as “Imagine,” after the break-up of The Beatles.
    Jack White, one half of former alternative rock band The White Stripes, tries his hand at a solo career with his debut solo album “Blunderbuss.”
    Released on April 23, 2012, “Blunderbuss” sold 138,000 copies in its first week, and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200.
    White came into the music industry with then-wife, Meg White, in 1997, as The White Stripes. After a successful music career, the Stripes broke up in 2011.
    After 14 years of being one-half of a duo, many wondered if White could successfully break away and strike out on his own.
    The answer is, not really. Lets face it, White was the driving force behind the White Stripes.

  • Fashion Maven: Clothes make a statement

    Many of you out there read this column every time it’s published and some of you may even follow the advice in it. Article after article has been written, telling people how they should dress, how to do their hair and what accessories to use. Yet, at the end of the day, what does it matter? What is the purpose of being fashionable, anyway?
    It’s easy to imagine that many people would ask themselves this — and you can’t blame them. After all, we grow up learning why manners are useful and why doing our homework is important, but unless you have a fashionable family, is anyone ever taught the reasons that dressing well is crucial?
    Fashion is an essential part of life. Style can determine first impressions, credibility and self-esteem.
    For example, if you go to school in your pajama pants, you give off the impression that you would rather be sleeping. People often assume that if you appear as if you could care less about the way you look, your attitude may likely match your ensemble.
    Dressing for an interview, which some job-seeking teenagers may have to do, falls into the same category. If one candidate for a job appears at an interview smartly dressed and the other shows up in sweatpants and slippers, who do you think is more likely to get the job.