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Today's News

  • Peanut butter recall expands to major retailers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A recall of peanut butter and other nut products has some of the country's largest grocery stores pulling store-brand products off their shelves.

    New Mexico-based Sunland Inc. has expanded its recall of peanut butter and almond butter to include cashew butters, tahini and blanched and roasted peanut products. The company, which sells its nuts and nut butters to large groceries and other food distributors around the country, recalled products under multiple brand names last month after salmonella illnesses were linked to Trader Joe's Creamy Salted Valencia Peanut Butter, one of the brands it manufactures.

  • Police: Drunk NM man called police on himself

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say an Albuquerque man has been arrested for drunken driving — after he called police on himself.

    KRQE-TV reports that Antonio Candelaria recently was arrested when officers found him drunk in his driveway and lying on the ground with his foot stuck in his motorcycle.

    Police say the 50-year-old had called police for help after getting his foot stuck.

    According to police, Candelaria's breath test results came out above .16, which is twice the legal limit in New Mexico.

    Court records showed that Candelaria had a long list of DWI arrests and a handful of convictions.

    It was unclear if Candelaria had an attorney.

  • LANL publishes 2011 Environmental Report

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has published its 2011 Environmental Report. The massive 406-page volume contains information on virtually every aspect of the lab's impact on the Northern New Mexico environment.

    Chapters cover areas such as compliance, radiological and non-radiological dose assessments, air sampling, groundwater monitoring, foodstuffs and biota monitoring, and environmental restoration.

    The full report can be viewed by clicking here.

  • 10 things to know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today (times in EDT):

    1. WHAT THE SUPREME COURT MAY CONSIDER THIS TERM

    The justices return Monday with rulings ahead on affirmative action, gay marriage and voting rights.

    2. WHICH PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE IS BETTER AT DEBATES

    Obama says it's Romney, who he calls "a good debater," as both candidates prepare for Wednesday's face-off.

    3. MOTORCYCLE BOMBER KILLS 14 IN AFGHANISTAN

    The suicide attack targeted a joint patrol of Afghan and international forces; among those killed were three NATO service members and their translator.

    4. WHERE GAY 'CONVERSION' THERAPY WILL BE BANNED

  • Today in History for October 1st
  • The AP top 25 college football poll 9-30-12

    The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking:

  • One Soldier's Tale: 2,000 Dead in Afghanistan
  • Bizarre tumor case may lead to custom cancer care

    It's a medical nightmare: a 24-year-old man endures 350 surgeries since childhood to remove growths that keep coming back in his throat and have spread to his lungs, threatening his life. Now doctors have found a way to help him by way of a scientific coup that holds promise for millions of cancer patients.

    The bizarre case is the first use in a patient of a new discovery: how to keep ordinary and cancerous cells alive indefinitely in the lab.

    The discovery allows doctors to grow "mini tumors" from each patient's cancer in a lab dish, then test various drugs or combinations on them to see which works best. It takes only a few cells from a biopsy and less than two weeks to do, with materials and methods common in most hospitals.

    Although the approach needs much more testing against many different types of cancer, researchers think it could offer a cheap, simple way to personalize treatment without having to analyze each patient's genes.

  • Today in History for September 30th
  • One take on Ashley Pond

    In response to the Sept. 21 Los Alamos Monitor article regarding the Ashley Pond project meeting.  This was a 30% design meeting to discuss the renovations at the pond, by no means the final.
    Why have the meeting if the public input is not welcome or its considered too late. People can not always attend all the meetings, but I was at the earlier meetings, I voiced my concern about the stage on the water but there was no response. I realize majority rules. But so should common sense.  
    People were not there to protest at this last meeting, it was a nice discussion.  I think all those in attendance at this meeting are for the renovations and don’t want delay, some of us that voiced our opinions just want this stage on the water rethought.
    It could certainly save the County lots of money if they leave off this stage. Funny how the project consultant, George Radnovich could not even tell us how much this stage would cost. Only what  the cover for the stage would be depending on the style selected. It was mentioned that the cover would have to be removed after each event, where would it be stored, how much time will this require?