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Today's News

  • Softball, baseball both in action today

    LA, St. Pius square off in softball

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper softball team will be on the road for a big Class 4A match-up with a longtime rival.
    The Hilltoppers (2-5) will take on the St. Pius X Sartans in Albuquerque.
    So far this season, the Hilltoppers are 1-4 against Class 4A opponents and may not be able to afford a nondistrict loss to another 4A opponent if they have their eye on hosting a first round playoff game.
    The Sartans (4-8) lost four of their first five contests this year, but have won two of their last three outings before being romped 15-4 against Valley at last weekend’s Metro Invitational.
    Los Alamos, meanwhile, shut out Pojoaque Valley 10-0 in its most recent outing last Tuesday. Pitcher Emilee Jones threw six shutout innings and Erin Kirk, in her first appearance of the season, went 3-for-4 at the plate, scoring two runs and driving in a run.
    Today’s game, which is scheduled to start at 4:30 p.m. will be broadcast on KRSN AM 1490.

    ’Topper baseball team faces Chargers at home

  • Nuclear waste a growing headache for SKorea

    ULSAN, South Korea (AP) — North Korea's weapons program is not the only nuclear headache for South Korea. The country's radioactive waste storage is filling up as its nuclear power industry burgeons, but what South Korea sees as its best solution — reprocessing the spent fuel so it can be used again — faces stiff opposition from its U.S. ally.

    South Korea fired up its first reactor in 1978 and since then the resource poor nation's reliance on atomic energy has steadily grown. It is now the world's fifth-largest nuclear energy producer, operating 23 reactors. But unlike the rapid growth of its nuclear industry, its nuclear waste management plan has been moving at a snail's pace.

    A commission will be launched before this summer to start public discussion on the permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel rods, which must be locked away for tens of thousands of years. Temporary storage for used rods in spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants is more than 70 percent full.

    Undeterred by Japan's Fukushima disaster or recent local safety failings, South Korea plans to boost nuclear to 40 percent of its energy needs with the addition of 11 new reactors by 2024.

  • Today in History March 26
  • $338M NJ Powerball winner says he'll help family

    PASSAIC, N.J. (AP) — The winner of a $338 million Powerball jackpot told several media outlets Monday that his first priority will be helping his family.

    Pedro Quezada, 44, entered Eagle Liquors store, where the ticket was sold, late Monday afternoon. The Passaic store owner ran Quezada's ticket through the lottery machine to validate that it was a winner as a newspaper and television outlets recorded the moment.

    The New Jersey Lottery confirmed that the winning ticket was validated at the store at 4:30 p.m. Monday, but officials said they didn't yet know the winner's name.

    Quezada told reporters in Spanish that he was "very happy" and that he intends to help his family.

    His wife, Ines Sanchez, told the Bergen Record that Quezada called her with the news Monday afternoon.

    "I still can't believe it," she said. "We never expected it but thank God."

    The numbers drawn Saturday were 17, 29, 31, 52, 53 and Powerball 31. A lump sum payout would be $221 million, or about $152 million after taxes. It's the fourth-largest jackpot in Powerball history.

  • Raw: Golfer Climbs Tree, Hits Ball Off Limb
  • Raw: Spring Snow Covers DC Cherry Trees
  • LANL's Melton to head W.Va. Capitol agency

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — An official at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will oversee the West Virginia Capitol and other state buildings.

    Administration Secretary Ross Taylor announced Gregory Melton as the new director of the General Services Division on Monday. Melton starts April 1.

    A West Virginia native, Melton has been a maintenance manager and group leader at Los Alamos. The New Mexico complex is 36 square miles with more than 1,200 buildings and 8 million square feet of facility space.

    General Services oversees the state Capitol building and its campus as well as other state government buildings around West Virginia.

    Melton is a West Virginia University graduate and a former U.S. Air Force officer. He succeeds David Oliverio, who helped oversee a major turnaround at General Services before his departure earlier this month.

  • Today in History March 25th
  • Workers to petition governor for minimum wage hike

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A group called Working America says it will be in Santa Fe Monday to try and persuade Gov. Susana Martinez to sign a minimum wage increase.

    The group says it will deliver thousands of photo petitions and petition signatures to the governor's office in support of a just-passed Senate Bill to increase the state's minimum wage from $7.50 to $8.50 an hour.

    Martinez has said she opposes the bill because it would make the state's minimum wage the fourth highest in the nation. She says she told lawmakers she would support raising the minimum wage to $7.80 an hour, the same as Arizona, but that the full dollar-an-hour increase was simply unsustainable.

  • Toenail clippings to measure toxic exposure in NJ

    GARFIELD, N.J. (AP) — The neighborhood looks exceedingly normal: single-family homes and apartment buildings packed together, dogs barking from postage-stamp-size lawns, parents hustling down narrow sidewalks to fetch their children from school. But something with very dangerous potential lies below the surface, officials say.

    The residents' toenails will provide confirmation.

    A plume of hexavalent chromium, a metal used in industrial production that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls a "well-established carcinogen," has spread under Garfield, putting about one-tenth of the city's homes — about 600 structures and 3,600 residents — at risk.

    The Environmental Protection Agency is about to start drilling on the spill site to determine how much chromium is pooled beneath and remove tainted soil. The agency is also testing the broader area to determine how it will be cleaned up. Now a group of scientists from New York University is working to assess how much chromium residents may have been exposed to.