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Today's News

  • The wonder of Rio Grande del Norte

    Almost 30 million years ago, in what is now Northern New Mexico, two of our planet’s ever-shifting plates, the North American and the Pacific, crunched up against one another, causing a dramatic separation in the earth’s crust through which in time a great river would flow.
    Today that separation in the earth’s crust remains spectacular, and we know it as the Rio Grande Gorge, named for the river that runs through it, sometimes ferociously, sometimes serenely.
    To drive through that canyon is to drive through one of this continent’s beautiful and breathtaking wonders.
    Last week President Barack Obama used the powers vested in him by the Antiquities Act of 1906 to make it the “Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.”
    Corks were popping and hands were clapping from Taos to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., as the President signed a proclamation adding some 240,000 acres of Northern New Mexico, all the way up to Ute Mountain near the Colorado border, to the roster of national monuments.
    It was an especially poignant moment for New Mexico’s recently retired U.S. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, who was present for the White House signing ceremony.
    Bingaman has long championed national park or monument status for the area. “This is a great day for New Mexico,” the former senator said.

  • Dawn nears for smart regulation

    Regulation, government-style, begs for modern methods of limiting bad side effects.
    Yet a new concept cannot spread far unless it has a name. To urge change, this column introduces the new terms “integral regulation,” “built-in inspection” and “smart regulation.”
    Of necessity, regulation and civilization grew up together. Early societies expanded slowly, from isolated bands to tribes to city-states. Methods of regulating evolved as slowly as civilization.
    Regulation began with simple peer pressure, which evolved to tribal traditions and later into early religious themes.
    As time crept on, the need for regulation led to governments and politically-set rules.
    Technology enters the story. Technologies first were used as they came. The unwanted side effects is that a technology can have become more evident to more people as the technology gains more usage in more places.
    In our time, the side effects have come to be examined and judged in a set forum, such as an agency hearing with lawyers, technologists, interested spokesmen of all kinds and the government that is in office.
    By such means, a regulation is shaped to limit the harmful side effects. Meanwhile, the pace of technical innovation quickens. Quicker tools emerge quicker.

  • Be There 04-04-13

    Friday
    The Underground of Enchantment Traveling Exhibit, “Lechuguilla Cave of Carlsbad Caverns National Park,” will host an opening reception from 4-5:30 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Art Gallery; and from 5-6:30 p.m. at Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    Mapping Lechuguilla Cave. Local caver John Lyles will present highlights of his involvement in the Lechuguilla Cave mapping project. Hear about the history of discovery in one of the most beautiful caves in the world. 6:30 p.m. Free, no registration required. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.
    First Friday Forts. 3:30 to 5 p.m. Come to PEEC and get building. Join other kids and parents who like fort building to construct, play and hang out. Also, check out the mud pie kitchen. Visit pajaritoEEC.org for more information. Free.
    Saturday
    The American Legion Riders of Los Alamos is having a fund-raising ride in memory of a dear friend, Carol, who passed away unexpectedly from heart failure. The ride departs at 11 a.m., at the American Legion Hall (in front of the Fabulous 50’s restaurant). Proceeds from the $20 entry fee per person go to the American Heart Association; all are welcome. For more information call Montana at 406-240-8112.

  • Shelter to participate in microchip clinic

    A great opportunity is available April 27 at the 2013 Los Alamos Dog Jog, a $20 reduced fee microchip clinic.
    Veterinarians from Animal Clinic of Los Alamos have donated their time and expertise to implant the microchips and Friends of the Shelter is very appreciative of their participation. 
    The fee includes the registration of the microchip to a database that can be read by shelters and veterinary clinics throughout the United States.
    No sign up is required ahead of time, just stop by Chamisa School in White Rock from 9-10:30 a.m. The clinic is open to the public, even if you aren’t registered for the Dog Jog.
     The best reason to have your animal microchipped is the improved chance that you’ll get your animal back if it becomes lost or stolen. Disasters where animals become displaced, you leave your pet with a sitter and the animal escapes, dogs that run away during thunderstorms or 4th of July fireworks, auto accidents, these are all times when your animal can become lost.
     A microchip is a small, electronic chip enclosed in a glass cylinder that is about the same size as a grain of rice.

  • Local EMT recognized for services

    The Board of Directors of the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) recently recognized William F. Purtymun, a National Ski Patroller with the Pajarito Mountain Ski Patrol, for achieving 30 consecutive years as a Nationally Registered EMT.
    This distinction is an honor held by few EMTs.
    To maintain his status as a Nationally Registered EMT, Purtymun completed, on a biennial basis, the most comprehensive recertification program for Emergency Medical Technicians in America.
    He not only completed courses to refresh his fundamental knowledge and skills but also attended a minimum of two hours per month of additional continuing education courses to advance his knowledge on new lifesaving skills. This includes recently completing the National Association of EMT Tactical Combat Casualty Care course.
    By maintaining his Nationally Registered status and completing regular continuing education courses, Purtymun is among the few elite EMTs with the most training in pre-hospital emergency medical care in the nation.

  • Off The Hill 04-04-13

    Art openings

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces an exhibition and paintings by Michael Freitas Wood, titled, “Presentiment.” The exhibit will be up Friday-April 29 at 435 S. Guadalupe St.

    Comedy

    Bill Cosby performs at the Route 66 Legends Theater at 8 p.m. May 3. Tickets, $35-$75, are available at holdmyticket.com.

    Concerts

    Serenata of Santa Fe presents chamber music entitled “Gate Into Infinity.” on Sunday, May 5, 6 p.m. at St. John’s College, Jr. Commons Room. Featured performances by Robert Schumann, Somei Satoh and Heirtor Villa-Lobos; with Guillermo Figueroa, violin; Sally Guenther, cello; Pamela Epple, oboe; Jeff Sussman, percussion and Debra Ayers, piano. Reception to follow. Tickets available online at serenataofsantafe.org and at the Lensic Box Office, 988-1234. Tickets also available at the door. $25 general public; $20 seniors; $10 youth; $5 students, $1 children under 6. For more information call 989-7988.

    Sleeping With Sirens, Conditions, Dangerkids and Lions Lions, will bring their Take It Or Leave It Tour to the Sunshine Theater at 8 p.m. today. Tickets, $15, are available at sunshinetheaterlive.com.

  • Caroline Kennedy returns to poetry for 10th book

    Beginning work a few years ago on her latest book, an anthology of poems for young people, Caroline Kennedy found herself looking through one of her mother’s scrapbooks. She burst into laughter, she says, as she came across a poem that her brother John, as a youngster, had picked out and copied as a gift to their poetry-loving mom.
    “Willie with a thirst for gore, Nailed his sister to the door,” went the poem, by an unknown author. “Mother said with humor quaint, ‘Careful, Willie, don’t scratch the paint!’”
    The poem “brought back memories of our relationship,” Kennedy told a bookstore audience this week. “I laughed so hard.”
    But for Kennedy, now 55 and a mother of three grown children, there’s a deeper meaning to that irreverent ditty. Poetry was a central part of her home life growing up. She and John regularly copied out and illustrated poems for their mother, Jackie, upon birthdays and Mother’s Days. Sometimes, they’d recite them too, “if we were feeling competitive.” And at family gatherings with their grandmother, there were frequent challenges to recite Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s famous (and famously lengthy) “Paul Revere’s Ride.” Only Uncle Ted, it seems, was able to recite it in its entirety.

  • This week on PAC-8, April 5-11

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, April 5, 2013
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (3-26-13)
    01:00 PM The Power of NO/W
    03:00 PM Future Talk
    03:30 PM European Journal
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Jack Aeby talks about his work at the Los Alamos Historical Museum
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Hiroshima and Nagasaki 2010”
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, April 6, 2013
    FSTV

    Sunday, April 7, 2013
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Bandelier slates events for spring, summer season

    The busy season has arrived at Bandelier National Monument, with over 500 visitors per day arriving in Frijoles Canyon to explore the Ancestral Pueblo sites and enjoy the spring weather.
    A number of events have been planned through the rest of the year for visitors to enjoy.
    In April, National Park Week (April 20-28) is a good time to visit Bandelier and other national parks and monuments. To promote  events at parks and monuments, April 22-26 will be “Fee Free Days,” with no fees charged for entry to national parks and monuments around the nation.
    This year, Bandelier National Monument will again have a summer shuttle service. Beginning on May 24, visitors arriving between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. will park at the new White Rock Visitor Center in White Rock on N.M. 4 to pay their entrance fees and ride the shuttle (no additional charge) to the monument. Visitation is already filling the parking area in Frijoles Canyon, and the shuttles will help relieve congestion once the summer season arrives. 
    Some highlights of this year’s events will include a number of trail hikes, as well as star programs. The Nightwalk will take place on Friday nights in July and August, starting from Bandelier Visitor Center.

  • Restaurant Inspections 04-04-13

    The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.
    Santa Fe

    The Bitter End, 7 Caliente Road
    Date Inspected: March 29
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Trattoria Nostrani, 304 Johnson St.
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Shihumi Reamenya
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Starbucks at Target, 3550 Zafarano Road.
    Date Inspected: March 15
    Violations: No paper towels hand wash area.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Allsup’s #307, Agua Fria and Morningside
    Date Inspected: March 22
    Violations: One high risk violation — improper storage. 4 moderate risk violations — contaminated equipment. 4 low risk violations — storage and ventilation and lighting.
    Status of Establishment: No follow up required.