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Today's News

  • Bruins and Celtics alter schedules following Boston Marathon blast

    A few hours after the Boston Marathon bombings, and more than 1,000 miles away, a police officer with a German shepherd patrolled near an entrance to the baseball stadium where Miami hosted Washington on Monday evening — an unusual sight at Marlins Park.
    Inside, on the field, two Marlins officials gave a security supervisor a briefing about the ballpark's layout.
    "We are taking additional precautions and have intensified our security efforts in and around the ballpark to ensure everyone's safety," Marlins spokesman P.J. Loyello said.
    The postponement of Monday night's NHL game between the Bruins and Ottawa Senators, and the cancellation of Tuesday's NBA game between the Celtics and Indiana Pacers — both events to be held in Boston — were the most tangible reactions by sports officials to the explosions at the marathon finish line that killed at least three people and injured more than 140 others.
    A makeup date for Bruins-Senators was not announced; no other events from top professional leagues around the country were immediately called off.

  • Isotopes earn split at Iowa, travel to Omaha

    The Albuquerque Isotopes snapped a two-game slide and earned a split of their series against Iowa Monday night.
    The Isotopes banged out 15 hits and held the Iowa Cubs to just one run after the third inning to grab an 11-5 win. After winning the series opener, the Isotopes (7-5) dropped two straight games before Monday’s win.
    Today, Albuquerque travels to Omaha for a four-game set. It will make a quick stop back at Isotopes Park starting Saturday before hitting the road again.
    Monday, shortstop Dee Gordon went 3-for-5, scored two runs and drove in three runs to set the plate for the Isotopes. Meanwhile, Scott Van Slyke hit a pair of solo home runs to aid the cause, while Tim Federowicz and Alex Castellanos also went long.
    In all, Albuquerque had six extra-base hits and touched up Cubs starter Drew Carpenter (1-2) for seven hits in 4-1/3 innings.
    On the mound for the Isotopes, Stephen Fife (1-1) picked up the win. Fife struggled early, giving up four earned runs in the first three innings, but settled down to shut the Cubs out in the fourth and fifth.
    Relievers Peter Moylan and Chris Withrow allowed just a run and two hits between them the rest of the way. 

  • 'Topper girls take 2nd at Academy

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls tennis team finished as the runner-up in this weekend’s Albuquerque Academy Invitational.
    Los Alamos lost in the championship round to the Farmington Scorpions. The Scorpions nipped the Hilltoppers 5-4 to take the title.
    In all, seven schools took part in the two-day tournament, with the host Chargers using both their ‘A’ and ‘B’ squads. Academy’s top squad finished third, topping Bosque School in the consolation round.
    Los Alamos swept two of its opponents on the weekend, Academy’s ‘B’ team and Belen, but had dogfights in the other two rounds. In the team semifinals, the Hilltoppers squeaked by Academy’s ‘A’ team to win 5-4.
    The semifinal went down to the No. 3 doubles team of Hannah Cunningham/Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff, which topped Oakley Robertson/Emily Romero 6-2, 6-0 to secure the victory.
    Also winning in the semifinal round were Madeline Margevicius at No. 2 singles, Hsieh-Ratliff at No. 4 singles, Susanna Lucido at No. 5 singles and Nasim Andrews at No. 6 singles. All four of Los Alamos’ singles victories came in straight sets.

  • Governor shuffles cabinet

     SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez reshuffled the leadership of two state agencies on Monday because of the retirement of Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Secretary John Bemis.

    The governor named Environment Secretary F. David Martin to succeed Bemis, who is retiring Tuesday.

    The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department regulates oil and natural gas operations and is responsible for mine safety, reclamation of abandoned mines, state parks, forestry and fire management

  • Today in History for April 16th
  • Obama weighs in on Boston bombing

     

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A stony-faced President Barack Obama declared that those responsible for the explosions at the Boston Marathon "will feel the full weight of justice," but he urged a nervous nation not to jump to conclusions. Top lawmakers declared the deadly incident an act of terrorism, and a White House official said it was being treated that way.

    Obama, speaking from the White House late Monday, pointedly avoiding using the words "terror" or "terrorism," saying officials "still do not know who did this or why." However, a White House official later said the incident at the famous race was being treated as terrorism.

  • Bombs shatter Boston Marathon

     

    BOSTON (AP) — Two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon finish line Monday two hours after Lelisa Desisa and Rita Jeptoo crossed it to win the race. Two people were killed and at least a 100 were injured.

    Race volunteers and public officials rushed to the aid of wounded spectators, and the medical tent set up to care for fatigued runners was quickly converted to a trauma clinic. Runners and spectators were crying as they fled the billowing gray smoke rising from a running gear store overlooking the end of the course.

    The explosion sent some runners tumbling to the pavement and others, already unsteady from the 26.2-mile run, were knocked down by those rushing toward the scene. A Rhode Island state trooper who ran in the race said the blasts tore limbs off dozens of people.

  • NY Times wins four Pulitzers

     

    NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times won four Pulitzer Prizes on Monday, including the award for investigative reporting for stories that detailed how Wal-Mart used bribery to expand in Mexico.

    The Sun Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., was awarded the public service Pulitzer for its reporting on off-duty police officers' reckless driving.

    The Pulitzer in breaking news photography went to The Associated Press for its coverage of the civil war in Syria.

  • Authorities recover parts of pressure cooker

     

    BOSTON (AP) — Authorities investigating the deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon have recovered a piece of circuit board that they believe was part of one of the explosive devices, and also found the lid of a pressure cooker that apparently was catapulted onto the roof of a nearby building, an official said Wednesday.

    A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation confirmed to The Associated Press that authorities have recovered what they believe are some of the pieces of the explosive devices. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to publicly discuss evidence in the ongoing investigation.

    A person close to the investigation previously told AP the bombs consisted of explosives put in 1.6-gallon pressure cookers, one with shards of metal and ball bearings, the other with nails.

  • IAEA reviewing cleanup at Japan nuclear plant

     

    TOKYO (AP) — The U.N.'s nuclear watchdog agency Monday began reviewing the decommissioning process at Japan's crippled nuclear plant, where new problems are triggering growing safety concerns about a cleanup expected to take decades.

    The experts will assess and analyze melted reactors, radiation levels and waste management at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant to make its decommissioning process safer and more stable, team leader Juan Carlos Lentijo told reporters.

    The cleanup is "a very difficult challenge," he said, and "it is very important to conduct the decommissioning process in a very safe way."

    The mission by the 12-member team is the International Atomic Energy Agency's first review of the plant's decommissioning process.

    Japan's nuclear watchdog said there have been at least eight accidents or problems at the plant since mid-March, ranging from extensive power outages and leaks of contaminated water.