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Today's News

  • Streetlights to be turned off Dec. 24-26

    The Los Alamos County Transportation Division will turn off the power to various streetlights to enhance the viewing of holiday farolitos. The streetlights will be turned off Dec. 24 and will be restored on Dec. 26.
    For safety purposes, the Transportation Division requests that all vehicles and trailers be moved to off-street parking during the full period that lights will be off. If this is not possible, it is recommended that the vehicles and trailers be silhouetted by farolitos. Due to the limited sight visibility during the viewing, drivers are requested to travel the viewing areas at 15 miles per hour.

    The streets that will be affected:
    Barranca Mesa
    Los Pueblos, San Juan, Totavi, Navajo Road

    North Mesa
    Camino Redondo, Camino Medio, Cumbres Patio

    White Rock
    Canada Way, Canada Circle, Balboa Drive, Alhambra Drive, Barcelona, Brighton Drive, Briston Place

  • Middle school goes vertical

    Steel has started to go up at Los Alamos Middle School, as part of their construction project.

  • Update 12-21-12

    Monitor closed

    The Los Alamos Monitor office will be closed on Christmas and New Year’s Day.

    No blue bus service

    The NCRTD blue buses will not be in service Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 in observance of the Christmas and New Year’s holidays. For more information call toll free 1-866-206-0754, or visit ridethebluebus.com.

    Santa's truth

    The Los Alamos Little Theatre hosts “The Truth About Santa,” (PG-13) a melodrama about troubles at the North Pole, performed by the Southwest Rural Theatre Project. The show will be at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Admission is by donation.

    Live nativity

    There will be a living nativity staged in the United Church parking lot at 5 p.m. Monday Greet the holy family, the shepherds and kings and pet the stable animals. There will also be a candlelight service at 4 p.m. and one at 11 p.m.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

  • Maez joins the force

    Unlike recent additions to the Los Alamos Police Department, Cpl. Miguel Maez is no stranger to law enforcement. Maez recently resigned from the Espanola Police Department to come be a police officer in the Los Alamos Police Department.

    Maez said he always wanted to be police officer.

    “It was a childhood dream,” he said. “I always wanted to help people and serve the public. I followed my dream, Espanola gave me the opportunity and I took full advantage of it.”

    To Maez, being on the police force truly is still and always has been about helping people, and it always will be for him.

    “It’s about customer service, and I believe that makes a great asset to the citizens of Los Alamos County,” he said.

    Right now, like all new recruits to the LAPD, Maez is undergoing field training right now, which basically means getting to know the layout and streets of Los Alamos.

    Maez said though he liked being in Española, he felt he could further develop his career if he moved to Los Alamos Police Department, even though he briefly served as Española’s police chief as the Española Police Department was undergoing changes to its command structure.

  • Gas prices on the decline

    Just in time for the holidays, some local gas stations in Los Alamos are charging less than $3 per gallon.

  • P and Z preps for issues

    In a yearly report to the Los Alamos County Council this month, Planning and Zoning Commission Chair Fred Roach looked well beyond goals for the upcoming year. Roach asked council to consider and advise the commission on several issues through the end of FY2014.

    “I believe it’s better to be proactive before major things occur, instead of reacting as they come up as we have in the past,” Roach said.

    The longterm planning has to be sandwiched in between more immediate concerns. The P and Z has authority to approve, conditionally approve or disapprove site plans, special use permits and subdivisions.

    In the past year, the commission reviewed plans for the White Rock Visitor Center, the Smart House, the new clubhouse at the golf course, new radio towers on the ski hill and a two-lot subdivision in White Rock.

    Members of the P and Z expect to review plans for the Trinity Site and the first increment of White Rock’s A-19 development early next year. Roach also said that a pending foreclosure on a local hotel and the one just completed on Los Alamos Plaza could bring those two properties before the commission for redevelopment.

  • LANL floats new estimate

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory says there is nothing new to report, regarding to the stalled security upgrade project.

    But the Nuclear Weapons and Materials Monitor reported in last week’s edition that the cost to complete the project is expected to decrease by more than $14 million.

    Two weeks ago, Los Alamos National Security, LLC, announced it was making a $10 million payment in a joint statement released in conjunction with the National Nuclear Security Administration.

    The trade publication reported that a new estimate submitted by the laboratory to the NNSA would drop the price tag for finishing the second phase of the Nuclear Materials Safeguards and Security Upgrades Project to about $240 million, down from the $254 million cost estimate put forth by the lab last month.

    Lab spokesman Fred DeSousa said that LANL had no comment on the Nuclear Weapons and Materials Monitor report.

    In addition to the $10 million repayment by LANS, the trade publication reports that another $4 million would be saved by starting the project earlier than expected.

    The lab previously said the cost of the project had climbed to $254 million because of major construction problems, up from previous estimates of $213 million.

  • New councilors, clerk sworn in

    New councilors Peter Sheehey, Kristin Henderson and Steve Girrens along with new clerk Sharon Stover were sworn in by Municipal Judge Alan Kirk in his chambers this morning at the Justice Center.

  • Happy end of the world

    SANTA FE – And a happy end of the world to you. This seems to be a bigger end of the world than your typical end of the world. I hadn’t realized the Mayans had such a powerful lobby.
    No one seems to know exactly when this is going to happen.
    Some prophesies give it another couple of days. I’m going with today. It’s another one of those days that is all ones and twos. This year 12-12-12 seemed to be a more important day to people than any of the other triple repeating days were during the past 12 years.
    Maybe the end will come the second the solstice hits. I’m not sure what time that is and I’m not a big enough believer to go look it up.
    To demonstrate how little I believe, I’m having a big party tomorrow.
    Don’t bother dropping by. We’ll be in Scottsdale with our family, which is where we always like to be for ends of the world.
    Why am I so fixated on this particular end of the world? Maybe it is because so many friends are. They don’t necessarily think it is the end so much as that something will happen in their lives.
    Maybe the boss finally will realize they are the perfect person for that promotion.

  • From me to Yule

    With the holidays upon us, it’s a time of celebration, a time of reflection, and of course a time to spend lots of money on gifts that you can’t afford.
    For most Americans, it doesn’t really matter if one goes bankrupt in December or March or June.  The year offers ample opportunities to buy dangerous toys for your kids, Elvis Presley lamps for that Aunt you hate, ugly sweaters for your father, and Cadmium-laden Chinese jewelry for the one you love.
    But why dwell on the negative aspects of commercialism?  The holiday season is designed to give us all a chance to spend time with our families, maybe a day trip to enjoy the New Mexican scenery, or just sit back and relax for a few days.
    At this time of the year, I find myself enjoying the nuances of history, particularly that of holidays like Christmas.  Many people don’t know that Dec. 25 was chosen by the Christian church as a matter of
    convenience and opportunity.  Dec. 25 was already an established day of celebration by pagans.  The Roman festival of Saturnalia (worship of the God Saturn) and the “birthday” of Mithra (Persian God) were both on Dec. 25.