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Today's News

  • Chamisa third graders to return Wednesday; K-2 to return Thursday

     

    A combination of warm temperatures, tree leaves and ice is to blame for Monday’s flooding problems at Chamisa Elementary, according to school officials.

    The flooding mainly affected the K-3 classrooms in the school’s “primary pod,” severely damaging ceilings and carpeting in the school. Two classrooms in another part of the school were also damaged.

    School was canceled Monday and Tuesday. But Chamisa Elementary School principal Debbie Smith announced this afternoon that “we will begin bringing back students tomorrow on a staggered basis (third grade Wednesday and the Kinder through second on Thursday). We are relocating those classes within the school on a temporary basis.”

    • Third graders will resume classes Wednesday.  Smith and the teachers will meet third grade students and any interested parents in the gym tomorrow at 8:20 when school starts.  “We will be temporarily relocating the students to different spaces in the school,” Smith said.

    • Kindergarten through 2nd grade students will resume classes on Thursday. Smith and the teachers will meet students (and interested parents) in the gym Thursday morning at 8:20 to direct them to temporary classroom locations in the school.

  • Fourth time's a charm

    Los Alamos has seen three attempts to bring commercial air service to the county fail since the Department of Energy stopped subsidizing air service in 1995. Airport Manager Peter Soderquist has no intention of letting a fourth attempt meet the same fate.

    Soderquist, who conducted extensive research before even floating the idea of trying again to the Los Alamos County Council, has detailed a plan that includes right-sized aircraft, scheduling that corresponds with key flights at the Albuquerque International Sunport and fares that compete with other means of transportation.

    Soderquist plans to highlight the differences between this venture and earlier ones when he brings the contract for a new carrier before council Feb. 12.

    Two key issues that caused earlier airlines to fail have been addressed in the contract Soderquist is working out with New Mexico Airlines, which presented the most promising response to the county’s Request for Proposals.

    One key element is utilizing right-sized aircraft. Mesa Airlines, the second failed attempt, had an operating cost of $1,600 an hour due to the size of the aircraft. Mesa had a cancellation rate of 20 percent, largely due to the high price of flights.

  • Hagel supports nuclear arms cuts, then elimination

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Chuck Hagel, the likely next secretary of defense, would be the first to enter the Pentagon as a public advocate for sharply reducing the number of U.S. nuclear weapons, possibly without equivalent cuts by Russia. He supports an international movement called Global Zero that favors eliminating all nuclear weapons.

    That puts him outside the orthodoxy embraced by many of his fellow Republicans but inside a widening circle of national security thinkers — including President Barack Obama — who believe nuclear weapons are becoming more a liability than an asset, less relevant to 21st century security threats like terrorism.

    "Sen. Hagel certainly would bring to office a more ambitious view on nuclear reductions than his predecessors," said Steven Pifer, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. "While he would likely take a less dramatic position in office, it might not be a bad thing to have a secretary of defense question what nuclear deterrence requires today."

  • Another approach to fixing the economy

    Are you really ticked off at the dismal condition of New Mexico’s economy?
    Are you sick of hearing about our lousy tax laws, our unwelcoming business climate and our unprepared work force?
    Have you lost patience with the reports about how much better our neighboring states are? Does it bother you (as my colleague Harold Morgan noted recently) that Texas and Utah ranked first and second, respectively, in a 2012 CNBC study for the most business-friendly state, while New Mexico was tied for 36th? At least we weren’t 49.
    Are you tearing your hair out about our mediocre education system and massive dropout problem? The education issue is related to the economy. Executives don’t want to move their families to a state with an inferior education system. You’ve heard that, too.
    Everybody writes about this. I’m asking what we could do that hasn’t already been tried and gotten bogged down somewhere.

  • One man's crusade to save a breed

    One small bill before the Legislature opens the gate to sheep with history.
    In the 1980s Donald Chavez y Gilbert bought the family farm in Belen, which was once part of the 1742 Belen Land Grant. “I jumped into farming and livestock,” he says.
    At sale barns he began to notice that some of the sheep were different – they had hair instead of wool or an occasional ewe had horns. He talked to sellers to learn more.
    “The old guys would say, ‘We would go out hunting and find these sheep.’” Or, ‘When we were rounding up cattle, we’d pick up some sheep. We could never catch ‘em all.’”
    Intrigued, Chavez began buying these oddball sheep and learning more about them, which started him on a 25-year quest to save a heritage breed.
    “I’ve been a student of history all my adult life,” he said. A descendent of land grant founders and pioneers, Chavez listened to his grandfather’s stories haunted the library. Before long, he was immersed in Belen Founders Day events, local genealogy, family journals, and archives.
    Spanish settlers brought a number of animals to New Mexico whose offspring are now heritage livestock – Spanish barb horses, corriente cattle, and Churro sheep, prized for their wool in northern New Mexico and Navajo Country.

  • Calling all young artists

    Tails are wagging all over Los Alamos in anticipation of the 2013 Los Alamos Dog Jog, April 27. The Dog Jog is a fundraiser for the Friends of the Shelter, who provide medical services and needed items for animals at the Los Alamos Animal Shelter.
    The Dog Jog Committee is calling on all creative young artists to put their imaginations and love of dogs to work by submitting a drawing for the 2013 Dog Jog Logo Contest. The Logo Contest is open to youngsters in grades three through six, whose families live or work in Los Alamos County.
    The winning design will be used as the official 2013 Los Alamos Dog Jog logo and will be placed on event T-shirts and other official event materials. The Logo Contest winner will also receive one free T-shirt. See lafos.org for entry forms and details. For questions about the logo contest, call Terry at 662-9605. Deadline for the logo entry is 5 p.m. Feb.15.
     

  • Be There 01-29-13

    Thursday

    In Search of Dominguez and Escalante. Come to PEEC to hear photographers/authors Siegfried Halus and Greg MacGregor speak about their book, which follows the 1776 expedition of Francisco Atanasio Dominguez and Silvestre Velez de Escalante. 7 p.m. Free, with books available for purchase. No registration required. Visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org for more information.

    The deadline for receiving proposals for plays to be performed in the 2013-14 Los Alamos Little Theatre season is Jan. 31. Look for the information sheet on the resources page at lalt.org for instructions.

    The LAHS NJROTC will host brisket night from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Posse Lodge. A $10 donation includes barbecue pork, potato salad, baked beans, corn, a cookie and drink. Proceeds go toward competition travel.
    Sunday

    The Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge will hold a pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road. The menu includes plain, blueberry, banana, chocolate chip, special variety of the month pancakes and sausage, bacon, eggs, juice and coffee. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children ages 10 and younger.
    Feb. 4

  • Assets In Action: Be the change you want to see

    There are so many things I want to write about, this week.
    I think I have settled on the topic of Manti Te’o. I will take a different approach, though.
    The background story is that this is a 20-something college student and football star that appears to have been duped, at least a portion of the time, in an online romance.
    If we set the issue of guilty or not guilty, of knowing or not knowing, of being naive or being a master of deception aside, we have many other, more important issues to discuss.
    When I watched the interview on the ABC show, “Katie,” the thing that bothered me the most were some things that related to his relationship with his parents.
    I will start by saying that this appears to be a lovely family with only the best interest of each other at heart. A family with great core values, among them a love for each other.
    The trouble comes when Te’o made several references of wanting his parents to be proud of him.
    At the heart of that statement, is a lovely sentiment. A child actually cares what his parents think of him.
    The problem I have, is that he was so worried that his father wouldn’t be proud of him, that he lied about ever meeting her face to face, so as not to disappoint him.

  • LA boys, girls swim teams take top spots at Artesia

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys and girls swimming teams held off the St. Pius X Sartans this weekend to claim the top spots at Saturday’s Artesia Invitational.
    The Hilltopper girls earned 233 team points to earn the victory at Artesia while the Sartans finished with 190 points to finish as the runners-up Saturday, with Alamogordo grabbing 185 points in third place.
    Los Alamos’ boys also had to fend off a charge from St. Pius, but won by a margin of 246-214. Only one other team on the boys side finished with more than 89 points.
    This was the second win of the 2012-13 season for both the Hilltopper boys and girls.
    Individually for the Hilltopper girls, Sarah Lott (50-yard freestyle), Anna Wermer (100 freestyle) and Ashlynn Bennett (200 individual medley) and Kaitlin Bennett (100 breaststroke) earned victories Saturday. Ashlynn Bennett also had a second place finish in the 100 backstroke.
    For Los Alamos’ boys, they had two individual top finishers, Sam Harris in the 200 individual medley and Connor Schultz in the 100 breaststroke. Harris finished second in the 100 backstroke and Schultz did likewise in the 100 butterfly.

    Girls

     Team scores

  • Santa Fe tops LA big Saturday, 70-47

    SANTA FE — With under a minute remaining in the third quarter, the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys basketball team was very much in the game against the Santa Fe Demons.
    Then the wheels fell off.
    With the third quarter winding down, Los Alamos trailed by just 7 points to Santa Fe Saturday night at Toby Roybal Memorial Gymnasium. But Santa Fe went on a 9-2 run extending into the early part of the fourth quarter to take control of the contest.
    A pair of Los Alamos 3-pointers by Seth Drop and Skyler Veenis at the 6:11 and 5:21 mark cut the Santa Fe lead back down to 8 points, but that would be Los Alamos’ last hurrah in the game.
    Santa Fe outscored Los Alamos 20-5 in the final 5 minutes to roll to a 70-47 win in the District 2-4A contest.
    Los Alamos finished the second half with 18 team fouls — despite the whopping total called on the Hilltoppers, only a few of those calls, most of them coming after the score got out of hand, were dubious. Santa Fe was into the double-bonus just 12 seconds into the fourth quarter.
    In the final period, the Demons (9-10 overall, 1-1 in district) went to the foul line 20 times and converted 14 of those shots.
    For Los Alamos, starters Travis Richins, Simon Heath and Xavier Dennison fouled out in a span of 1:38, all before the halfway point of the fourth quarter.