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Today's News

  • Marr sets three U.S. swim records at Olympic Club

    One of the most prolific age-group swimmers in the country, Jackie Marr, is at it again.
    Marr, a local competitor who holds numerous master’s-level world and U.S. records, recently captured three more national titles. Competing at The Olympic Club national meet last month, Marr earned U.S. bests in her age group in the 400-meter, 800-meter and 1500-meter short course freestyle events.
    Just as impressive, Marr earned all three titles in the same swim.
    Marr was swimming in just one event, the 1500 freestyle, at The Olympic Club in San Francisco. Her split times in the 1500 — roughly equal to one mile — were good enough to give her the U.S. titles.
    “I thought I did really good,” Marr said. “I got tired doing flip-turns at the end.... I felt good, but I almost wish I could swim it over again.”
    As is usually the case for the fiercely competitive Marr, she wanted more. Specifically, she wanted to break her age group’s world short course record in the 1500, the time of which she has written on an index card: 23 minutes, 54.74 seconds.
    Marr recently turned 70, which now places her in the 70-74 age group at the master’s level. The first year of joining an age group is generally the prime chance swimmers have to make their marks.

  • Roundball roundup: Friday prep scores

     

    Boys Basketball

    Alamogordo 57, Mayfield 30

    Atrisco Heritage 74, Highland 58

    Belen 75, Valencia 46

    Bernalillo 51, Santa Fe 49, OT

    Bosque School 48, East Mountain 38

    Carrizozo 51, Santa Fe Waldorf School 36

    Clovis 82, Hope Christian 68

    Dora 73, Melrose 41

    Elida 53, Tatum 44

    Gallup 61, Grants 44

    Hobbs 99, Artesia 53

    La Cueva 70, Albuquerque Academy 65

    Las Cruces 49, Gadsden 27

  • Had your winter Phil? Check Groundhog Day forecast

    PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. (AP) — It's Groundhog Day and Punxsutawney (puhnk-suh-TAW'-nee) Phil has made his prediction. He says expect an early spring.

    With thousands watching on Gobbler's Knob in west-central Pennsylvania, the furry rodent emerged from his lair Saturday but didn't see his shadow.

    Legend has it that if the groundhog sees his shadow on Feb. 2, winter will last six more weeks. But if he doesn't see his shadow, spring will come early. At least that's what the Inner Circle says — the group that dons top hats and tuxedos on Groundhog Day each year to oversee the ceremony.

    Inner Circle president Bill Deeley says that after "consulting" with Phil, he makes the call in deciphering what the world's most famous groundhog has to say about the weather.

  • Today in History for February 2nd
  • Raw: Arrests at San Francisco Nudity Ban Protest

    Police have arrested four naked people protesting San Francisco's nudity ban on the steps of City Hall. The arrests on Friday came as the city's prohibition on going out in the buff took effect.

  • Practice ordnance found in LA Canyon

    Public Works employees working in Bayo Canyon got a bit of a surprise in the form of a 105 mm M46 projectile Thursday.

    The ordnance was discovered shortly after unloading some mud from a dredging operation taking place at the Los Alamos Canyon reservoir.

    The bomb squad from the Los Alamos Police Department was called, and ordnance experts from Kirtland Air Force base also were notified. They came up early this morning to run some tests on the projectile, only to determine it was a concrete-filled practice round left over from the World War II era, or earlier. 

    According to LAPD Cpl. Oliver Morris, it was a common size, “so it could have been even earlier,” Morris said. He also said however one of the other officers on the scene, Cpl. Sheldon Simpson, who was in the military in the 90s, was even familiar with the round.

    How it arrived in the Los Alamos Canyon reservoir is a bit of a mystery, but Public Works Project Manager and Senior Engineer Daniel Erickson said the experts told him it probably washed in from upriver somewhere.

    “It was in very good shape, so they think it probably washed into the reservoir in the recent past,” Erickson said.  “They also think that because the reservoir was dredged down to the bedrock shortly after the Cerro Grande Fire.”

  • Brisket night

    Los Alamos High School NJROTC members help out during brisket night at the Posse Lodge Thursday. 

  • Educators call on Round House

    Several representatives of Los Alamos Public Schools paid a visit to the Roundhouse in Santa Fe.

  • Update 02-01-13

    Movie premier

    The premier of Los Alamos resident Samantha Filer’s films, “The Sword of Arundel,” will be at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 15 at the First United Methodist Church, 715 Diamond Dr. The show is free.

    Fixing trash carts

    The Environmental Services Division announced it will fix trash and recycling roll carts free of charge. For more information, call 662-8163.

    Sierra Club

    Mariel Nanasi, executive director of New Energy Economy, will speak on “Securing a future without coal in New Mexico,” at the LASE/Sierra Club meeting at 7 p.m. Feb. 6 in media room 203, building two at UNM-LA.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

    Pancake breakfast

    The Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge will hold a pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. Feb. 3 at the Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children ages 10 and younger.

    Garden club

    The Summit Garden Club will meet Feb. 4, with guest Kimberly Tanner speaking on the topic of “Starting plants from seed, in a very, very small space.” Visitors welcome. For more information, call Nancy Nunnelly at 662-4950. 

  • GOP lawmakers propose overhaul of tax system

    SANTA FE (AP) — Republican lawmakers proposed Thursday to significantly revamp New Mexico’s governmental finance system by relying more on taxing people and businesses on what they consume and spend, rather than the income they earn.
    Rep. Tom Taylor and Sen. Bill Sharer, both of Farmington, outlined their proposal Thursday but conceded it’s a work-in-progress and not fully clear how the tax burdens of individuals and businesses will change.
    “It may overtax some areas and we need to understand all of that before we cast this thing in stone,” Taylor said.
    Sharer called it a “hard reboot of the New Mexico tax system.”
    The proposal would greatly expand what is subject to New Mexico’s gross receipt tax, which applies to sales of many — but not all — goods and services.
    Most groceries and food staples are tax exempt currently, but that would end under the proposed overhaul. Sharer said the tax would apply to “virtually everything that happens” in the state.
    By broadening the tax base, the lawmakers propose to reduce the tax rate and eliminate most other taxes, including the state’s corporate and personal income taxes.