.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Tough non-district schedule awaits LAHS girls soccer

    With a schedule full of potential playoff teams and rematches from a year ago, the road back to the state championship game will be more challenging than ever for the Los Alamos High School girls’ soccer team. 

    The Hilltoppers will now be competing in District 2-4A, alongside Moriarty, Pojoaque Valley and Taos. 

    None of the teams in LAHS’ previous district, Albuquerque Academy, Capital or Del Norte, are on this year’s schedule, though LAHS and Academy could meet in September at the Albuquerque Academy Tournament. 

    In total, 10 teams on this year’s schedule finished last season with a winning record, and nine teams made the state playoffs. 

    Eight of the games on the schedule are rematches from a year ago, including games against two of the teams LAHS beat in the playoffs in 2017. 

    The season kicks off Aug. 25 at home against Santa Fe Prep, a team that went 15-1-1 last year, with its only loss coming in the Class 4A semifinals, offering an immediate test for the Hilltoppers. 

  • Students awarded George and Joan Bjarke Scholarships

    Three local students have been awarded George and Joan Bjarke Scholarships.  

    The Bjarkes were longtime residents of Los Alamos and staunch supporters of education. A scholarship in their name is awarded annually to students who demonstrate good citizenship and the ability to successfully complete their selected degree or program.

    This year’s winners are Anastasija Draganic, Samantha Levings and Desere Martinez.

    The Bjarkes moved to Los Alamos in 1954 and raised six children, all of whom graduated from Los Alamos High School.

    George Bjarke worked at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and served several terms on the school board. He and his wife, Joan, believed every child deserved a chance to further their education.

    Draganic will attend Portland State University in the fall where she plans to major in economics.

    Levings is the daughter of Daniel Levings and Brandy Land. She plans to study biology and forensics at Eastern New Mexico University in the fall.

    Martinez is the daughter of Santiago and Esperanza Archuleta. She will attend California State University in the fall where she will major in biology.

  • White Rock prepares for Fourth of July festivities

    The annual Fourth of July celebration in White Rock will be held again this year at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 366 Grand Canyon.

    For the second year, arrangements have been made for a U.S. flag to be flown over the National Cemetery in Santa Fe.

    An organized run/walk will transport the flag from Santa Fe that morning and arrive in White Rock in time for the parade.

    To be a part of the run, visit eventbrite.com/e/4th-of-july-memorial-flag-carry-2018-tickets-33532634011?aff=eac2.

    Organizers invite all veterans and current military personnel to join in the final leg of the run/walk from the intersection of Rover Boulevard and Grand Canyon Drive, two blocks east to the church parking lot. There, they will be honored with a short message, the history of the flag will be shared, and the raising of the colors will be followed by the national anthem. Anyone who wants to be part of this group are asked to meet at the intersection at 9:30 a.m.

    The Children’s Parade will begin after the ceremony. Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts from various area units will lead the parade carrying the colors. Any veterans or military personnel who want to participate in the short parade, will follow the colors, children of all ages will be after that.

  • Assets in Action: Help youngsters be their best through reading

    One motto of the Search Institute for 2018 is that they bridge research and practice, “to help young people be and become their best selves.”

    One way for young people to even find their best self is through reading. How wonderful is it to get lost in a book. Can you recall the last time you read a book and literally didn’t want to put it down?

    I miss the Harry Potter book launches when people were lined up to purchase a book, not a phone, not a concert ticket, but a book. The Mesa Public Library’s waiting list for it was long, but you were happy to be on the list.

    The Asset category is Commitment to Learning and the Asset is called, Reading for Pleasure. This is defined as when a young person reads for three or more hours a week.

    My favorite kind of learning is when kids don’t even realize they are learning something. Reading for many of our youth is seen as that stuff you have to do in school in between taking the tests. This is one area where a small effort can make a huge impact.

  • Assets in Action: Help youngsters be their best through reading

    One motto of the Search Institute for 2018 is that they bridge research and practice, “to help young people be and become their best selves.”

    One way for young people to even find their best self is through reading. How wonderful is it to get lost in a book. Can you recall the last time you read a book and literally didn’t want to put it down?

    I miss the Harry Potter book launches when people were lined up to purchase a book, not a phone, not a concert ticket, but a book. The Mesa Public Library’s waiting list for it was long, but you were happy to be on the list.

    The Asset category is Commitment to Learning and the Asset is called, Reading for Pleasure. This is defined as when a young person reads for three or more hours a week.

    My favorite kind of learning is when kids don’t even realize they are learning something. Reading for many of our youth is seen as that stuff you have to do in school in between taking the tests. This is one area where a small effort can make a huge impact.

  • Bosque Redondo, Long Walk, treaty are Southwest survival stories

    It’s a human thing, I think, that nearby things and people get less attention. So it was for the Fort Sumner Historic Site/Bosque Redondo Memorial and George Dodge Jr., a Santa Rosa businessman. Then Dodge, a Democrat, became a state representative. With De Baca County, home to the Bosque Redondo Memorial, in his district, Dodge’s perspective changed.

    Dodge shared the story on a hot Saturday, June 9, at the memorial, as part of events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the June 1, 1868, signing of the treaty releasing Navajos from the concentration camp (today’s common term), allowing them to go home, and establishing the Navajo Nation.

    For the Navajo Nation, 2018 is the Year of the Treaty.

    June was full of commemoration events at Window Rock and other locations.

    One of three treaty documents is now displayed at the Memorial, which is seven miles southeast of Fort Sumner. It’s a big deal; it’s important.

    Navajos came to Bosque Redondo as prisoners of war, rounded up by soldiers led by Col. Kit Carson. Carson also got some of the Mescalero Apache people to Bosque Redondo, though without the scorched earth campaign conducted against the Navajos.

  • The full-blown sprint to 5G commercialization begins

    BY ASHA KEDDY
    Vice President, Technology, Systems Architecture & Client Group and General Manager of Next Generation and Standards, Intel Corporation

    Just six short months ago, I remarked that the finalization of the Non-Standalone 5G New Radio represented “One Small Step for 5G, One Giant Step for Wireless ” – noting that, with the announcement of the common standard, the real innovation was just beginning. Today, I’m excited to say that the industry has not just taken more steps to advance the future of 5G, but has gone from a walk to a jog to a run, and is now in a full-blown sprint to commercialization, as the 3GPP Release 15, Standalone (SA) 5G NR standard is finalized.

    Intel has been uniquely positioned at the forefront of these conversations – providing essential technological inputs and leveraging global partnerships to push testing and implementation of standards-based technologies.

    We’re also working with operators and manufacturers worldwide, to drive a wholesale transformation of the network infrastructure required to deliver 5G experiences to a flexible, agile and virtualized architecture powered by Intel computing technologies.

  • $2B power line project awaits green light in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Hours of testimony, reams of documents and the concerns of ranchers and others are being weighed as New Mexico regulators consider clearing the way for a $2 billion power line project to funnel wind and solar energy from New Mexico and Arizona to the rest of the American Southwest.

    A five-day hearing before the Public Regulation Commission wrapped up Tuesday, but it will likely be September before a final decision is made.

    The SunZia project has been years in the making and not without controversy. Disputes rose over its proximity to a U.S. military installation and environmentalists raised concerns about effects on wildlife.

    Federal land managers spent years reviewing the potential effects, and Arizona regulators signed off in 2015.

    In New Mexico, SunZia is seeking permission for the location of the transmission lines and rights of way.
     

  • New Mexico candidates blame politics for family separations

    By MORGAN LEE, Associated Press

    SANTA FE (AP) — With no mention of President Donald Trump, candidates for an open congressional seat along the U.S. border in New Mexico blamed Washington politics for the separation of immigrant children from parents who are caught trying to come to the U.S. illegally.

    The zero tolerance policy on border security that led to the separations has rocked political campaigns in border states and sent Republicans on Capitol Hill frantically searching Tuesday for ways to end it.

    Amid protracted negotiations in Congress over an immigration reform package, immigration authorities are arresting anyone who illegally crosses the border,

    Under the current law, children can't go to jail with their parents, so they are being separated and confined. U.S. officials said Tuesday they are still working out the process of reunifying families.

    Water rights attorney Xochitl Torres Small, the Democratic candidate in New Mexico's sprawling 2nd Congressional District, said Tuesday that separating children from parents is immoral and Washington is to blame.

    "Our immigration system is broken, but Washington's solution is to break up families," Torres Small, the granddaughter of Mexican immigrants, said in a statement. "I won't stand for it."

  • Trump announces plans for Pentagon to create 'Space Force'

    By MARCIA DUNN, AP Aerospace Writer

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Vowing to reclaim U.S. leadership in space, President Donald Trump announced Monday he is directing the Pentagon to create a new "Space Force" as an independent service branch aimed at ensuring American supremacy in space.

    Trump envisioned a bright future for the U.S. space program, pledging to revive the country's flagging efforts, return to the moon and eventually send a manned mission that would reach Mars. The president framed space as a national security issue, saying he does not want "China and Russia and other countries leading us."

    "My administration is reclaiming America's heritage as the world's greatest spacefaring nation," Trump said in the East Room, joined by members of his space council. "The essence of the American character is to explore new horizons and to tame new frontiers."