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Today's News

  • LA County Council passes $188M budget

    The Los Alamos County Council passed the proposed budget for fiscal year 2019 in the amount of $188,838,880 Tuesday following two nights of departmental budget hearings.

    The budget, which was arrived at under a flat budget moratorium by County Manager Harry Burgess, will be submitted to the state prior to the June 1 deadline, and will then be adjusted either up or down depending on the outcome of the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s contract status. The outcome of the lab’s bid won’t be made public for at least a couple of months.

    Should the contract come back putting LANL in the for-profit category, the council would start considering budget options, or add backs, submitted by each department.

    “Although flat budgets are easy to listen to and easy to approve, I think we’d all rather be fighting over a list of add backs at this point,” said Councilor Antonio Maggiore. “So I look forward to the contract getting resolved and being able to hack this out in the true, usual fashion and get a little more for the community.”

    But should the contract outcome be not-for-profit, the councilors would then have to look for cuts in the budget.

  • Seoul: N. Korean leader removes major nuclear sticking point

    BY FOSTER KLUG
    Associated Press

    SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean President Moon Jae-in said Thursday that his rival, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, isn’t asking for the withdrawal of U.S. troops from the Korean Peninsula as a precondition for abandoning his nuclear weapons. If true, this would seem to remove a major sticking point to a potential nuclear disarmament deal.

    North Korea, a small, authoritarian nation surrounded by bigger and richer neighbors, has always linked its pursuit of nuclear weapons to what it calls a “hostile” U.S. policy that is embodied by the 28,500 U.S. troops stationed in South Korea, the 50,000 stationed in Japan, and the “nuclear umbrella” security guarantee that Washington offers allies Seoul and Tokyo.

    Although Moon reported that North Korea isn’t asking for the U.S. troops to leave, he said the North still wants the United States to end its “hostile” policy and offer security guarantees. When North Korea has previously talked about “hostility” it has been linked to the U.S. troops in South Korea.

  • Road to be closed Tuesday

    Torreon Road in Los Alamos will be closed for a sewer repair Monday and Tuesday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Local access will be provided for residents and deliveries.
    Contact Cartwrights Plumbing for any questions or concerns at 505-982-2511.

  • Local churches to host service dedicated to Mexico work

    Members and friends of the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will host a church service dedicated to the work of the trip to Mexico Sunday.

    The spring break travelers will share their experiences of what took place on the life changing venture. The team of 75 built 3 homes for 3 families in four days. The Puerto Penasco venture is a year in the making, with a long history of service.

    One local first timer on the trip, was LAHS junior Jack Whitacre. Whitacre was invited by a friend who had been on a previous trip.

    The United Church of Los Alamos is located at 2525 Canyon Road. The Sunday service will begin at 9:30 and last for one hour. Additional information is available at 662-2971.
     

  • School board votes in $37.9M budget

    The Los Alamos School Board voted 5-0 Tuesday to pass a $37.9 million budget for the 2018-19 school year.

    The budget includes a 4.5 percent raise for all staff and teachers starting July 1. Raises for teachers over the last four budgets totaled 10 percent overall.

    Other budget highlights included the addition of a student success coordinator at the Los Alamos Middle School, a middle school math coach and the addition of a part-time Native American liaison for the middle school.

    The board began working on the budget at the beginning of the year, and prioritized the budget according to the goals and directives included in the school board’s Strategic Plan. The board adopted the Strategic Plan in April 2016. The top three priorities of the plan are student well being, student learning and teacher and staff well-being and excellence.

    The suggestion to add a Native American liaison came from the district’s Native American Parent Advisory Council.

    “There was a need to coordinate more closely with the tribal governors and to provide training for culturally appropriate material for students,” said Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus.

  • LAHS softball keeps win streak alive

    In Major League Baseball, the talk of the world is about Shohei Otani, the Los Angeles Angels’ two-way star that is dominating on the mound and at the plate in his first season in America. Locally, it turns out Los Alamos High School has a two-way threat of its own on the softball team. Katie Wimer, a sophomore, continued her outstanding season Wednesday afternoon against Albuquerque Academy, picking up a win on the mound with a complete game, and driving in 7 runs at the plate in a 15-5 victory. 

    This season, Wimer has pitched 30.1 innings on the mound, collecting a record of 4-1 while striking out 27 batters. At the plate, she has been even more impressive, batting .492 while driving in 35 RBI’s and knocking three home runs out of the park. 

    In an important district game against the Chargers, the Hilltoppers needed every part of Wimer’s game to pull out the victory. 

    After the pitchers dominated for the first two innings of Wednesday’s game, posting clean innings, Academy took a 1-0 lead in the top of the third inning. 

    That’s when the LAHS offense woke up and returned to the form that it has shown throughout district play. 

  • Baseball drops heartbreaker at home to Academy

     All season, the Los Alamos High School baseball team has relied on strong pitching and timely hitting. Wednesday afternoon, the timely hitting was nowhere to be found as the Hilltoppers lost to Albuquerque Academy 5-4 at Bomber Field. 

    This was an important district game for both teams, as Academy entered the contest with a record of 7-1 in District 2-5A, one game ahead of the Hilltoppers, who entered the game at 6-2. A win would have pulled the Hilltoppers into a tie for first place in the district. Instead, the team is now left to wonder if it has done enough to earn an at-large bid to next month’s state championship tournament. 

    The opportunities were there for LAHS to take control of the game, and yet the big hit wouldn’t come to put the contest out of reach. 

    The Hilltoppers’ first opportunity came in the first inning, when the team loaded the bases with a pair of singles and a walk before Walker Eaton flew out to the left fielder to end the inning. 

    Academy also wasted early opportunities, leaving a man stranded on third base in the first inning, and two runners in scoring position in the second inning. 

  • Hilltoppers fall to Duke City at home

    Facing Duke City at Dara Jones Field Saturday afternoon, the young Los Alamos High School boys’ lacrosse team showed it still has a lot to learn about competing at the highest level, falling 17-3. 

    Duke City dominated possession of the ball from the very beginning, going up 5-0 before the Hilltoppers got the ball across midfield. 

    After switching sides for the second quarter, the Hilltoppers seemed to gain a little bit of momentum and went on the attack. Kevin Dors got LAHS on the board with a beautiful shot from close range, making the score 5-1. 

    However, Duke City, which is made up of some of the best lacrosse players in all of Albuquerque from multiple schools, continued to attack and quickly put the game out of reach. 

    Long after the outcome had been decided, Caleb Key and Jack Vandenkieboom scored goals for the Hilltoppers, temporarily sending cheers throughout the home crowd. 

    As the final whistle blew, however, Duke City emerged with a 17-3 victory. 

  • LAHS golf has strong day at home invite

    More than 100 players and 13 teams came together at the Los Alamos County Golf Course Monday morning for the LAHS Spring Invite, where the Hilltoppers played host and enjoyed great results. 

    The boys’ team finished as the overall runner-ups, while the girls were able to boast the event’s overall champion. 

    On the boys’ side of the event, Los Lunas High School walked away as the champions, finishing with a team score of 322. LAHS finished four strokes behind in second place, with a team score of 326. Rounding out the top three was Hope Christian, which finished with a team score of 335. 

    Other teams that participated in the tournament for the boys were Robertson, St. Michael’s, Capital, Tucumcari, East Mountain, Española Valley, Raton, Taos and West Las Vegas. 

    Individually, many Hilltoppers put together solid rounds. Davis Johnson was the team’s top golfer finishing with a score of 77, just six strokes off the leader. Henry Poston and Sean Rau both finished with scores of 81, while Conner Cook finished with a score of 84, Jacob Benelli finished with a score of 87 and Landon Burk finished with a score of 88. 

  • Los Alamos loses a legend

     He was born with so little, but in the end, had given the community he chose to settle in so much. Los Alamos lost one of its most influential residents Wednesday.

    Nerses “Krik” Krikorian was born on a Turkish roadside in 1921. He was a refugee of the Armenian genocide. He was an immigrant, a chemist and a family man. He passed away Wednesday at 97.

    Krikorian, had such an influence on what Los Alamos is today that in a way, he is still here. He helped found the Los Alamos United Church of Los Alamos, the J. Oppenheimer Memorial Committee and he also helped create the original county charter. 

    He did all these things while working as a chemist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and raising a family. These are just some of the reminders of Krikorian’s dedication to making what started out as a place to put a secret laboratory into a real, working community.