.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Update 09-18-13

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilties will hold its monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. to in Room 110 of the Municipal Building. The main topic will be a public hearing on the proposed gas rate ordinance. If approved, it will be introduced to county council at a regular meeting at a later date, after which a council public hearing will be scheduled. Interested residents are encouraged to attend this public hearing.

    Environment

    Come learn about county efforts to increase environmental sustainability and create a stronger and healthier community. The meeting is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Thursday in the BCC Conference Room in the Municipal Building.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at noon Sept. 27 in council chambers in the Municipal Building.

    Shelter hours

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter announced its new hours: Noon to 6 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on weekends.

    APP board

    The Los Alamos County Art in Public Places Board holds its regular meeting at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 26 at Mesa Library.

  • County council to re-examine strategic plan

    The rapidly-shifting sands of reduced revenue flowing into county coffers are forcing a reprioritization of goals based on a new reality.

    It became clear during Tuesday’s work session at White Rock Fire Station No. 3 that members of the Los Alamos County Council were dissatisfied with the county’s Strategic Leadership Plan.

    One of the main motivations for re-examining the plan is the change in circumstances since it was adopted in 2011. Targets have been delayed due to reduced resources for implementation.

    “Two years ago, I directed staff to support any of their budget requests by using the MAP documents as a reference,” County Administrator Harry Burgess said. “Unfortunately, the last budget year we had other priorities —mainly reducing the budget — and we had so much focus on that we did stray from utilizing the MAP documents in the budget process.”

    MAPs, or Management Action Plans, were developed within each county department as a means of implementing the Strategic Plan.

    Councilor Pete Sheehey advocated for prioritizing the plan’s 10 focus areas, which break down into 16 goals.

  • County sustains more than $5M in flood damage

    Last week’s storms, especially the one of Friday the 13th, will prove costly to Los Alamos County.

    The county released preliminary flood cost estimates from public works and utilities and the price tag could be more than $5 million, according to memos released Wednesday.

    “Keep in mind that these are very rough cost estimates at this point,” county public information officer Julie Habiger said in an email.

    Habiger said the county qualifies for FEMA and state assistance.

    “We are submitting our cost estimates to them today,” Habiger said Wednesday morning. “All counties in New Mexico were invited to submit preliminary flood damage estimates after Gov. Martinez issued her disaster proclamation on Friday. Whether or not the county will receive any portion of its claim from FEMA or the state is yet to be determined. There were many counties in the state with serious damage to infrastructure and that will likely impact funding levels.”

    Habiger said if FEMA and the state reject the claims, the county will have to explore other options

  • Today in History for September 18th
  • Voters reject proposed UNM-LA 2-mil levy

    The crowd in the lobby of the Los Alamos Municipal building was guarded, as members of the UNM-LA Advisory Board and the Los Alamos Committee For Higher Education waited anxiously to see if the residents of Los Alamos voted for a 2-mil increase in their taxes to help support the University of New Mexico, Los Alamos campus.

    The polls closed at 7 p.m., and County Clerk Sharon Stover had the results by 7:30 p.m.

    It was not to be. Though the margin was close, with 47.49 percent of those who voted supported the measure, and 52.21 percent voted against it. The unofficial tally is 2,662 for and 2,908 against.

    UNM-LA Business Director Lisa Wismer, who was one of many heavily involved in the “Vote Yes” campaign, offered words of consolation.

    “I’d like to thank you for showing your support, appreciation and support you showed UNM-LA,” she told the crowd. “We all have a passion for education, and we wanted to convince the community to invest in the future, as far as it relates to UNM-LA, and it didn’t come out the way we hoped.”

    UNM-LA had a lot riding on the vote. Recent degree programs started by UNM-LA, including fire science and robotics were supported by $3 million in grants, many of which are due to run out soon and are not renewable.

  • United Way kicks off annual campaign

    The United Way is kicking off the Investing in Community Campaign at 5 p.m. Wednesday at the White Rock Tourist Information Center.
    The event is in conjunction with the Chamber of Commerce FAN Club.
    United Way officials will reveal the Community Action Fund goal for this year.
    There also will be a chance to meet local non-profits who are benefitting from the Community Action Funds raised last year.
    Los Alamos National Bank is a sponsor of this year’s kickoff event.
    Catering will be done courtesy of Tasty Creations by Jarda.
    On Sunday, the United Way will feature the Dinner Over Diamond from 4-7 p.m. on the overpass on Diamond Drive by the high school.
    The dinner will feature specialty pizzas and salad from Home Run Pizza and dessert from the Los Alamos Co-op Market.
    Tickets are 10 for students and $15 for adults. Children under four are free.
    Contact United Way for more information at 662-0800 or unitedwaynnm.org.
     

  • Flash flooding threat diminishes

    Forecasters say flash flooding is less likely in much of northern and central New Mexico but that continued rain still keeps that threat alive in some areas, particularly on the eastern plains south of Interstate 40.
    The National Weather Service says scattered showers and some heavy rainfall are expected to continue through Tuesday and later into the week.
    Meanwhile, the American Red Cross says it has opened a new shelter in Crownpoint in northwestern New Mexico.
    That shelter at Crownpoint High School is being used by Navajo Technical University students. They’d been in a temporary shelter because of storm damage to the university campus last week.
    Gov. Susana Martinez has approved an emergency airlift of food, water and other supplies to a tiny community in southwestern New Mexico that was cut off after flooding washed out the only paved road leading to it.
    Martinez spokesman Enrique Knell said Monday that supplies will be flown into the former mining town of Mogollon on Tuesday.
    The community became isolated after weekend flooding damaged state Route 159. Roughly 16 residents permanently live in the town nestled in the mountains in Catron County. A creek paralleling the road surged from its banks after heavy rains.

  • Update 09-17-13

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilties will hold its monthly meeting at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in Room 110 of the Municipal Building. The main topic will be a public hearing on the proposed gas rate ordinance. If approved, it will be introduced to county council at a regular meeting at a later date, after which a council public hearing will be scheduled. Interested residents are encouraged to attend this public hearing.

    Election results

    Members of the public awaiting final election results from theclerk’s office regarding the UNM-LA special mail out election are invited to gather in the lobby and council chambers of the new Municipal Building starting at 7 p.m., today. Results will be posted in the east and west entrance windows of the building as well. Election results also will be made available on LAMonitor.com.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. today at the White Rock Fire Station No. 3.

    Brown Bag

    Brown Bag Lecture. Explosives at LANL with Cary Skidmore and Dan Hooks. Noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday at the Bradbury Science Museum. To highlight the laboratory’s work in the field of explosives, the museum will host an exhibit that begins at 4 p.m.

  • Next Big Idea Festival

    The soggy ground from the week’s rain storms did not stop the public from enjoying The Next Big Idea Festival, complete with face painting and a dunk tank and a number of other
    activities.
     

  • Bandelier plans to reopen Thursday

    Thursday, unless there is another flood in the meantime, the Frijoles Canyon area of Bandelier National Monument will re-open after being closed for a week. Visitors will be able to once again catch the shuttle bus in White Rock and see the results of the recent record-breaking rains.

    On Monday, the Bandelier staff had their first chance to deal with what happened during flooding over the weekend. It quickly became apparent that it would be some days before it would be safe to welcome visitors into the canyon, the park’s main visitor area.

    Cleanup of mud and debris began, but assessment showed that there would also be long-term effects of the three episodes of high water that had passed through.

    High water had come down the canyon on Thursday evening, Friday morning, and again on Saturday night. Frijoles Creek generally runs about 10 cubic feet per second (cfs), but during the Friday event, the largest of the three, it is estimated that the flow reached between 7,500-9,500 cfs. For comparison, on Sunday the Rio Grande near San Ildefonso Pueblo was carrying between 1,250 and 2,500 cfs.