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Local News

  • Raw: Arrests at San Francisco Nudity Ban Protest

    Police have arrested four naked people protesting San Francisco's nudity ban on the steps of City Hall. The arrests on Friday came as the city's prohibition on going out in the buff took effect.

  • Practice ordnance found in LA Canyon

    Public Works employees working in Bayo Canyon got a bit of a surprise in the form of a 105 mm M46 projectile Thursday.

    The ordnance was discovered shortly after unloading some mud from a dredging operation taking place at the Los Alamos Canyon reservoir.

    The bomb squad from the Los Alamos Police Department was called, and ordnance experts from Kirtland Air Force base also were notified. They came up early this morning to run some tests on the projectile, only to determine it was a concrete-filled practice round left over from the World War II era, or earlier. 

    According to LAPD Cpl. Oliver Morris, it was a common size, “so it could have been even earlier,” Morris said. He also said however one of the other officers on the scene, Cpl. Sheldon Simpson, who was in the military in the 90s, was even familiar with the round.

    How it arrived in the Los Alamos Canyon reservoir is a bit of a mystery, but Public Works Project Manager and Senior Engineer Daniel Erickson said the experts told him it probably washed in from upriver somewhere.

    “It was in very good shape, so they think it probably washed into the reservoir in the recent past,” Erickson said.  “They also think that because the reservoir was dredged down to the bedrock shortly after the Cerro Grande Fire.”

  • Brisket night

    Los Alamos High School NJROTC members help out during brisket night at the Posse Lodge Thursday. 

  • Educators call on Round House

    Several representatives of Los Alamos Public Schools paid a visit to the Roundhouse in Santa Fe.

  • Update 02-01-13

    Movie premier

    The premier of Los Alamos resident Samantha Filer’s films, “The Sword of Arundel,” will be at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 15 at the First United Methodist Church, 715 Diamond Dr. The show is free.

    Fixing trash carts

    The Environmental Services Division announced it will fix trash and recycling roll carts free of charge. For more information, call 662-8163.

    Sierra Club

    Mariel Nanasi, executive director of New Energy Economy, will speak on “Securing a future without coal in New Mexico,” at the LASE/Sierra Club meeting at 7 p.m. Feb. 6 in media room 203, building two at UNM-LA.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

    Pancake breakfast

    The Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge will hold a pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. Feb. 3 at the Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children ages 10 and younger.

    Garden club

    The Summit Garden Club will meet Feb. 4, with guest Kimberly Tanner speaking on the topic of “Starting plants from seed, in a very, very small space.” Visitors welcome. For more information, call Nancy Nunnelly at 662-4950. 

  • GOP lawmakers propose overhaul of tax system

    SANTA FE (AP) — Republican lawmakers proposed Thursday to significantly revamp New Mexico’s governmental finance system by relying more on taxing people and businesses on what they consume and spend, rather than the income they earn.
    Rep. Tom Taylor and Sen. Bill Sharer, both of Farmington, outlined their proposal Thursday but conceded it’s a work-in-progress and not fully clear how the tax burdens of individuals and businesses will change.
    “It may overtax some areas and we need to understand all of that before we cast this thing in stone,” Taylor said.
    Sharer called it a “hard reboot of the New Mexico tax system.”
    The proposal would greatly expand what is subject to New Mexico’s gross receipt tax, which applies to sales of many — but not all — goods and services.
    Most groceries and food staples are tax exempt currently, but that would end under the proposed overhaul. Sharer said the tax would apply to “virtually everything that happens” in the state.
    By broadening the tax base, the lawmakers propose to reduce the tax rate and eliminate most other taxes, including the state’s corporate and personal income taxes.

  • County budget crunch could curtail services

    One of the legs in the county’s efforts to balance the budget despite decreasing revenues is reducing operating expenses. The Los Alamos County Council examined several proposals floated by staff during its Tuesday meeting.

    Councilors generally supported staff recommendations, with a few exceptions. Concerns centered around potential impacts on citizens and staff, as well as county infrastructure.

    “The fundamental first priority is providing those operational services. The community expects certain services, and I think this will be painful as it is,” Councilor David Izraelevitz said. “Reducing that even further would be unacceptable to our customers. Take any additional operational costs off the table.”

    Deputy County Administrator/Chief Financial Officer Steven Lynne highlighted cuts that could bring up to a $4.8 million in reduction in budget, which is about 10 percent lower than FY2013.

    One change that could affect customer service is reducing staffing levels through attrition and reorganization. Council agreed with County Administrator Harry Burgess and his recommendation that more drastic measures such as countywide layoffs or furloughs should be avoided if possible, so impacts on customer service are minimal.

  • On a Beach, Dog Sniffs Out Valuable Whale Vomit
  • Chu to step down as Energy Secretary

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu is stepping down.

    The Energy Department, which runs the Los Alamos National Laboratory, said Friday, that Chu has offered his resignation to President Barack Obama. Chu won a Nobel Prize in physics but came under questioning for his handling of a solar energy loan.

    Chu is a former director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. He drew fire from Republicans who criticized his handling of a $528 million federal loan to solar panel maker Solyndra, which later went bankrupt, laying off its 1,100 workers.

    The White House said Chu retained Obama’s confidence, but Chu was widely expected to leave following Obama’s re-election last fall.

     Chu intends to resign once a successor is confirmed, according to a memo sent to Energy Department staff and obtained by website POLITICO. He was the last of President Barack Obama’s long-serving Cabinet members to announce plans to leave or stay for the second term.

  • Ed Koch, Mayor Who Became a Symbol of NYC, Dies