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Local News

  • Today in History for March 6th
  • Venezuela President Hugo Chavez dies--Video Extra

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuela's government announced the death of President Hugo Chavez on Tuesday, ending 14 years of charismatic rule by the firebrand socialist but leaving his party firmly in control of the nation.

    Vice President Nicolas Maduro's voice broke several times and tears ran down his face as he appeared on national television to announce that Chavez died at 4:25 p.m. local time (3:55 p.m EST;1755 GMT) "after battling tough with an illness over nearly two years."

    He did not say what exactly killed Chavez, although the government had announced the previous night that a new, severe respiratory infection had severely weakened him.

    Just a few hours earlier, Maduro made a virulent speech against enemies he claimed were trying to undermine Venezuelan democracy.

    But as he announced the death, Maduro called on Venezuelans to be "dignified inheritors of the giant man" Chavez was.

    "Let there be no weakness, no violence. Let there be no hate. In our hearts there should only be one sentiment: Love. Love, peace and discipline."

    Maduro called on Venezuelans to convene in the capital's Bolivar Square, named for the 19th century independence hero Simon Bolivar, who Chavez claimed as his chief inspiration.

  • County officials visit NNSA

    NNSA Acting Administrator Neile Miller recently hosted Los Alamos County Council Chair Geoffrey Rodgers, County Councilor Peter Sheehey and County Administrator Harry Burgess. Miller thanked the county officials for their active interest in Los Alamos National Laboratory and for their leadership in the community. Miller told the contingent that NNSA recognizes the value of a strong and collaborative relationship with the leadership of its laboratories’ and plants’ communities and appreciates the opportunity to advance the national nuclear security agenda through their partnership.

  • Update 03-05-13

    DWI meeting

    The Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council meeting will be at 8:30 a.m. March 14 in the Los Alamos Police Department Training Room, 2500 Trinity Dr., Suite A.

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    Kiwanis

    Kiwanis meets from noon to 1 p.m. each Tuesday at the Masonic Temple on Sage, near the intersection of 15th and Canyon. March 12: Feliciano Jiron, chief executive officer of Los Alamos Medical Center, will discuss changes at the hospital. March 19: Mike Lansing, associate director for Safeguards and Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will discuss new security initiatives at LANL.

    Council meeting

    Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. today in council chambers.

    Master gardeners

    The March meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at the White Rock Town Hall. Discussion will be plans for the Hope Garden.

  • Flag pole damage at Barranca Mesa

    The flagpole at Barranca Mesa Elementary School blew over in the winds at about 2 p.m. Monday. The school’s maintenance department was on sight almost immediately and had the pole removed from the building. At no time did the flags touch the ground. It appears that the pole rusted off at the base and slowly eased over and rested on the building, causing minimal damage. This will prompt an inspection of the flagpoles at the other schools.

  • Mysterious electrons found in Van Allen belts

    U.S. researchers, including a trio from Los Alamos National Laboratory, have witnessed the mysterious appearance of a relatively long-lived zone of high-energy electrons stored between Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts.
    The findings, discovered by NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes), were outlined in Science Express and during a press conference at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C.
    Dan Baker of the University of Colorado, Boulder, Laboratory led the research for Atmospheric and Space Physics.
    “Nature keeps on surprising us by producing long-lived harsh environments in space in regions not previously considered,” said Los Alamos plasma physicist Reiner Friedel of LANL’s Intelligence and Space Research Division. “This finding may impact the planning of future space missions.”
    The Van Allen radiation belts — named in honor James Van Allen, who discovered them nearly 50 years ago — are a pair of donut shaped zones of charged particles that surround Earth and occupy the inner region of our planet’s Magnetosphere. The outer belt contains extremely high-energy electrons, while the inner belt is comprised of energetic protons and electrons.

  • Feds seek Jemez Pueblo claim dismissal

    First of a two-part series.

    The Justice Department has filed a motion in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque to dismiss the Jemez Pueblo lawsuit to reclaim tribal lands which encompass much of the Valles Caldera National Preserve.

    The government’s motion focuses on a claim settled under the 1946 Indian Claims Commission Act called Pueblo of Zia, et al v. United States, in which Zia, Jemez and Santa Ana Pueblos sought compensation for an alleged “taking” of approximately 520,000 acres of land. Attorneys argued that the United States had allowed others to take possession of those lands “in derogation of the rights of the petitioners.”

    The Valles Caldera land was not part of that lawsuit or settlement, but federal attorneys are now claiming that the ICC’s authority to “hear and determine all tribal claims against the United States that accrued before Aug. 13, 1946” — and a five-year window to file those claims —precludes any later claims. The motion argues that “Congress vested the ICC with expansive and exclusive jurisdiction to litigate all pre-1946 Indian-claims.”

  • Moniz tapped for DOE

    The Obama Administration Monday nominated three people to fill open spots on the president’s second term cabinet. Among them, Ernest Moniz was tapped to head the Department of Energy.

    Reportedly well known and respected in scientific circles, Moniz, if confirmed by the Senate, would replace outgoing DOE Secretary Steven Chu. The following biographical information was published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Moniz is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems, director of the Energy Initiative, and director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has served on the faculty since 1973. He served as head of the Department of Physics and as director of the Bates Linear Accelerator Center. His research focus is energy technology and policy, including a leadership role in MIT interdisciplinary technology and policy studies on the future of nuclear power, coal, nuclear fuel cycles, natural gas, and solar energy in a low-carbon world.

  • 106-year-old Mass. man gets high school diploma

    BEVERLY, Mass. (AP) — Fred Butler was married for 65 years, raised five children, served in the Army during World War II and worked for years for the local water department, but the fact he never earned a high school diploma always bothered him.

    Not anymore.

    The 106-year-old was awarded his honorary diploma Monday during an emotional ceremony attended by school officials, state lawmakers and Beverly Mayor Bill Scanlon.

    "I thank everybody who is responsible for this," he said, wearing a mortar board hat and tassel and holding the prized document in his hands. "I certainly appreciate it."

    Butler dropped out of school before the ninth-grade to accept a full-time job at a print shop to support his mother and five younger siblings.

    Daughter-in-law Cathy Butler says he regretted dropping out and always emphasized the importance of education to his children and grandchildren.

  • Bio on Ernest Moniz, Obama's nominee to head DOE

    The Obama Administration yesterday nominated three people to fill open spots on the president's second term cabinet. Among them, Ernest Moniz was tapped to head the Department of Energy.

    Reportedly well known and respected in scientific circles, Moniz, if confirmed by the Senate, would replace outgoing DOE Secretary Steven Chu. The following biographical information was published by the Massachussetts Institute of Technology.

    Moniz is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems, Director of the Energy Initiative, and Director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has served on the faculty since 1973. He served as Head of the Department of Physics and as Director of the Bates Linear Accelerator Center. His research focus is energy technology and policy, including a leadership role in MIT interdisciplinary technology and policy studies on the future of nuclear power, coal, nuclear fuel cycles, natural gas, and solar energy in a low-carbon world.