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Local News

  • Eastbound I-40 reopens in Albuquerque

     

    The New Mexico Emergency Operations Center is advising motorists that I-40 eastbound will be re-opened at 11 a.m. in Albuquerque.

     I-40 is still icy and snow-covered in Texas and into Oklahoma.  I-40 will be re-opened in phases in Texas; currently it is closed until further notice from Amarillo to the Oklahoma state line.

     Motorists are advised to seek southern alternate routes out of Albuquerque and Amarillo.  I-25 and U.S. 285 are open for traffic. Texas officials will divert traffic at Amarillo south onto US-287 to Dallas.  Motorists are advised to use caution.

  • Egypt Balloon Crash Kills 18 Foreign Tourists
  • Today in History for February 26th
  • First Person: Cutting Edge Tunnel Poised to Open

    A pair of slick new mile-long tunnels in California is undergoing final safety tests this month, poised to divert motorists away from an ocean cliff-hanging roadway dubbed Devil's Slide to a smooth, Alpine-like passageway unlike any in the U.S.

  • Raw: Snow Forces Road Closures in Texas, Okla.
  • Today in History for Monday, February 25th
  • Johnson wins Daytona 500; Patrick eighth

     

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — A big first for Danica Patrick, but an even bigger second for Jimmie Johnson.

    Patrick made history up front at the Daytona 500 Sunday, only to see Johnson make a late push ahead of her and reclaim his spot at the top of his sport.

    It was the second Daytona victory for Johnson, a five-time NASCAR champion who first won "The Great American Race" in 2006.

    Patrick, the first woman to win the pole, also became the first woman to lead the race. She was running third on the last lap, but faded to eighth at the finish.

  • Today in History for February 24th
  • LAHS students out-brain competition

    It was a pressure cooker last Saturday at Albuquerque Academy, as some 40 schools that came to compete in a regional high school science competition got picked off one by one. It eventually came down to Albuquerque Academy and Los Alamos High School. 

    Albuquerque Academy answered an “interruption” question, and got it wrong; giving the four Los Alamos students (plus one alternate) the decisive victory in one of the most prestigious and intense science competitions New Mexico has to offer. 

    The New Mexico High School Science Bowl winners this year from Los Alamos High School happened to be high school senior and captain Kevin Gao; school senior Aaron Bao; junior Alex Wang; and sophomore Willie Zhao.

    Sponsored by the Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories, the New Mexico High School Science Bowl is where only the best and the brightest from New Mexico’s schools compete for the top honor, as the teams have to square off against other teams in a button-pushing, Jeopardy-style competition that has students answering questions in a multiple number of science disciplines, including math, physics, Earth science, chemistry, biology and astronomy. 

  • Council set to mull sewer rate hikes

    Those with firsthand experience of failures in the county’s aging wastewater infrastructure — such as the Manhattan Loop resident who reported a geyser of sewage from the manhole in her backyard — may not quibble with a proposed sewer rate increase the Los Alamos County Council is set to hear Tuesday. 

    However, the proposed increase is a sharp one and it will likely stir some debate.

    A flat rate of $25.31 per month plus a $7 customer charge would immediately go into effect for residential customers. Homeowners that consume a winter average of 4,000 gallons of potable water per month would see a slight decrease in their sewer bill for the first year. 

    Apartment complexes would be charged a flat fee of $21.09 per dwelling, plus the $7 customer charge. Currently, apartment complexes pay $17 to $24 per dwelling, depending on the winter average of potable water consumed. Most of these customers will see an increase of 15 to 20 percent but a few will actually see a decrease at the outset of the proposed rate’s implementation.