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Local News

  • Update 04-12-13

    Editor's note

    The Los Alamos School District is on spring break this week. And so is columnist John Pawlak. His column will return next week.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will hold budget hearings beginning at 7 p.m. April 15 in council chambers.

    Run For Her Life

    3rd Annual Run For Her Life Fight Breast Cancer 5K or 10K Run or Walk $25 (first 100 get a T-shirt) $30 after Wednesday and on race day) All donations and race proceeds will go to Hadassah for breast cancer research, education and treatment. Race begins at 9 a.m. Sunday at East Park.

    Poetry gathering

    Mesa Public Library will host Poetry Gatherings, a place for people to share their love of poetry. The gatherings take place on the second Thursday of each month in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library from 6:30-8 p.m.

  • Living Treasures to be honored April 21

    It is once again time to invite northern New Mexicans to celebrate the contributions of those who have so greatly enhanced life on the Hill. Living Treasures of Los Alamos will honor Lee A. Builta, Rosmarie H. Frederickson and Craig Martin at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The public is invited to attend the ceremony and reception, sponsored by the Los Alamos National Bank.
    Rosmarie H. Frederickson
    Rosmarie H. Frederickson was born in Germany and came to the U.S. at age 12. She is the daughter of scientist Werner W. Hohenner, who was able to bring his family to the U.S. after the war, and once here he was able to help develop the Polaris missile.
    The family moved several times, finally settling in the Washington D.C. area. She attended Temple University for two years, coming home to help run the household because her mother was dying of cancer. She finished her education at the University of Maryland. There she met her husband. After graduation, she worked several years as a third grade teacher in the area, but again there were many moves in her future.
    How did Fredrickson become an active volunteer in so many community organizations?

  • Clubhouse construction

    Construction workers at the golf course steady drainage equipment to siphon off water at the construction site Friday.

  • Board weighs electronics disposal

    Technology has become a big part of children’s education.
    Projectors, computers, audio visual equipment, the accessories that go with them and other technological devices, have become part of the bevy of tools used to convey and teach information to today’s students.
    Like in any other school district in 21st century America, there’s a lot of it in the Los Alamos Public Schools, and lately, some Los Alamos School Board members as well as school officials have noticed there might be trouble coming if they don’t find a uniform and organized of way of keeping track of it.
    Board member Kevin Honnell thought it was time the district start keeping better notes on how an item was acquired, why an item was acquired and noted that sometimes there just isn’t enough detail when it comes to filling out the reports that explain why a piece of equipment is being discarded.
    “It seems when we dispose of lots of thousand-dollar plus items... without any explanation to the public as to why they’re being given away, that we may be opening ourselves up for criticism by someone who may have an axe to grind,” he said at one point in the meeting.
    He used the high school report as an example.

  • Alcove House damaged

    The National Park Service has closed the Alcove House Site at Bandelier National monument due to concerns over the structural stability of the archeological site and exhibit.
     Historic masonry repairs dating to the 1930s have developed a network of cracks.
    In recent days, masonry at this location has become dislodged, raising concern for visitor safety.
    The National Park Service is actively engaged in planning repairs for the site.
    On Wednesday, staff from Bandelier’s Vanishing Treasures division was conducting an assessment of the site for future stabilization work, when they discovered that the Kiva structure was showing significant signs of deterioration since they last examined it.
    Masonry had become loosened and the structure was being undercut. Perched at the edge of a niche in a cliff the equivalent of 14 stories above the floor of Frijoles Canyon, the Alcove House Kiva is known for its precarious setting, as well as the breathtaking series of ladders and stairs visitors must climb to reach it.
    Because of its popularity and its location staff returned to the site on Thursday to make further assessments, and recommended closure. Alcove house will be closed until the site can be stabilized, likely for many months.

  • Bandelier to close Alcove House indefinitely

    The National Park Service has closed the Alcove House Site at Bandelier National monument due to concerns over the structural stability of the archeological site and exhibit.

     Historic masonry repairs dating to the 1930s have developed a network of cracks.  In recent days, masonry at this location has become dislodged, raising concern for visitor safety.  The National Park Service is actively engaged in planning repairs for the site.

    On Wednesday, staff from Bandelier’s Vanishing Treasures division was conducting an assessment of the site for future stabilization work, when they discovered that the Kiva structure was showing significant signs of deterioration since they last examined it.

    Masonry had become loosened and the structure was being undercut. Perched at the edge of a niche in a cliff the equivalent of 14 stories above the floor of Frijoles Canyon, the Alcove House Kiva is known for its precarious setting, as well as the breathtaking series of ladders and stairs visitors must climb to reach it.

    Because of its popularity and its location staff returned to the site on Thursday to make further assessments, and recommended closure. Alcove house will be closed until the site can be stabilized, likely for many months.

  • Today in History April 12
  • North Korea hints it will soon launch a missile

     

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Hinting at a missile launch, North Korea delivered a fresh round of war rhetoric Thursday with claims it has "powerful striking means" on standby. Seoul and Washington speculated that it is preparing to test-fire a missile designed to be capable of reaching the U.S. territory of Guam in the Pacific Ocean.

    The latest rhetoric came as new U.S. intelligence was revealed showing North Korea is now probably capable of arming a ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead.

    On the streets of Pyongyang, North Koreans shifted into party mode as they celebrated the anniversary of leader Kim Jong Un's appointment to the country's top party post — one in a slew of titles collected a year ago in the months after his father Kim Jong Il's death.

    But while there was calm in Pyongyang, there was condemnation in London, where foreign ministers from the Group of Eight nations slammed North Korea for "aggressive rhetoric" that they warned would only further isolate the impoverished, tightly controlled nation.

  • Nearly 200,000 eligible for state health credits

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Nearly 192,000 New Mexicans will be eligible for subsidies to help pay for health insurance next year, according to a report an advocacy group released Wednesday.
    The report from Families USA, a Washington-based consumer health organization, said the federal tax credits that take effect Jan. 1 will make health insurance affordable for many working families and young people.
    “The tax credit subsidies are a game-changer,” Ron Pollack, executive director of Families USA, said in a conference call. “They will make health coverage affordable to huge numbers of families that would otherwise be priced out of the health coverage and care they need.”
    Barbara Webber, executive director of Health Action New Mexico, said New Mexico is one of the states with the most to gain from the new health care laws because of its high numbers of uninsured and underinsured residents.
    “Many of our families have gone for generations without health care coverage,” she said.

  • Update 04-11-13

    BPU meeting

    The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Public Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m. April 17 in the DPU Conference Room, 170 Central Park Square.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

    County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council will hold budget hearings beginning at 7 p.m. April 15 in council chambers.

    Run For Her Life

    3rd Annual Run For Her Life Fight Breast Cancer 5K or 10K Run or Walk $25 (first 100 get a T-shirt) $30 after Wednesday and on race day) All donations and race proceeds will go to Hadassah for breast cancer research, education and treatment. Race begins at 9 a.m. Sunday at East Park.

    Poetry gatherings

    Mesa Public Library is pleased to host Poetry Gatherings, a place for people to share their love of poetry. The gatherings take place on the second Thursday of each month in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library from 6:30-8 p.m.