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Local News

  • Garcia Richard gears up for legislative session

    Those who drafted the New Mexico State Constitution decided not to create a year-round governing body, but rather what is known as a “citizen legislature.” That idea strikes a chord with newly-elected Democratic Dist. 43 State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard.

    “I always go back to that, because that defines our legislature as drawing folks from all backgrounds and all walks of life,” Garcia Richard said.”And it occurred to me that my voice as a working person, as a person who has kids currently in the school district and as a person who is currently in the classroom was maybe not a voice that was very strongly heard in that body. That’s the reason that I decided to run, to bring that perspective.”

    Being a citizen legislator with those types of commitments presents some challenges. But Garcia Richard is drawing on her experience during the 1990s, working as a member of the House Majority Analysts, to plan in advance and meet the challenges.

    Garcia Richard is a third grade teacher at Pablo Roybal Elementary School in Pojoaque. When she decided to run, Garcia Richard worked with school administrators and the superintendent to arrange a long-term leave if elected. She answered questions about her leave for the Pojoaque school board last week.

  • Seedlings go on sale

    More than 80,000 tree and shrub seedlings are available for public purchase through the New Mexico State Forestry Division’s 2013 Spring Conservation Seedling Program. Sixty different tree and shrub species will be available, according to Conservation Seedling Forester Carol Bada. Seedling sales will begin Monday.
     “The careful planting of tree and shrub species is vital to promoting healthy forests and watersheds in New Mexico,” Bada said. “Not only will tree seedlings help rehabilitate areas affected by fires, but they will also help protect crops, promote energy conservation and improve aesthetics on both private and public lands.” 
     Seedlings are available to landowners who own at least one acre of land in New Mexico and who agree to use the trees for conservation purposes including erosion control, wildlife habitat, reforestation, riparian restoration, windbreak establishment, tree plantations and other conservation needs. Seedlings are available on-line at nmforestry.com and by mail-in order form. All proceeds are re-invested into the program.
     Tree and shrub species available include: ponderosa pine, shrubby cinquefoil, chokecherry, native plum, piñon, fernbush and approximately 60 others.

  • Raw: Inauguration in Mexico Sparks Violence

    Violence broke out in Mexico City on Saturday as protesters took to the streets to oppose the inauguration of incoming president Enrique Pena Nieto and the return of his Institutional Revolutionary Party.

  • Update 12-02-12

    Book Sale

    Scholastic books are for sale at The Family YMCA from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily through Dec. 6. The public is welcome to come to the Y and shop. Partial proceeds will benefit the Y’s annual campaign that supports scholarships for those needing financial assistance.

    Kiwanis meeting

    Kiwanis meets each Tuesday, noon to 1 p.m., at the Masonic Temple, on Sage, near the intersection of 15th and Canyon. On Tuesday, Linda Deck, director of the Bradbury Science Museum, will speak on the current displays at the museum.

    Sponsor a family

    The Family YMCA is sponsoring four families for the holidays and welcomes the community to participate by taking part in the Giving Tree. For more information call the Y at 662-3100.

    DWI council

    The Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council will meet at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 11 at the Los Alamos Police Department Training Room, 2500 Trinity Dr., Suite A.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

     

  • Chiefs player kills girl friend, himself

     

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — It began like any other Saturday for the Kansas City Chiefs during the NFL season, their general manager and coach at work early to put final touches on this weekend's gameplan. Then they got a call to hurry to the parking lot.

    The two men rushed through the glass doors of Chiefs headquarters and came face-to-face with linebacker Jovan Belcher, holding a handgun to his head.

    Belcher had already killed his girlfriend and sped the short distance to Arrowhead Stadium, right past a security checkpoint guarding the entrance. Upon finding his bosses, Belcher thanked general manager Scott Pioli and head coach Romeo Crennel for giving him a chance in the NFL. Then he turned away and pulled the trigger.

  • Today in History for December 1st
  • Semi-Final Scores for Prep Football

     

    PREP FOOTBALL
    Class 5A
    Semifinal

    Sandia 37, Volcano Vista 5

     

    Class 4A
    Semifinal

    Goddard 35, Belen 7

     

    Class 3A
    Semifinal

    Silver 37, Ruidoso 10

     

  • Heavy smoke damages Orange St. duplex

    Fire officials said it all started when duplex owner Maria Mojica heard a “popping sound” downstairs.

    “She went down to investigate and she saw smoke and flames coming from the side of the dishwasher,” said Los Alamos Fire Department Capt. Jason Lopez.

    Los Alamos Fire Department crews were dispatched around 1 p.m. Friday to respond to a call in the 3000 block of Orange Street.

    “We made entry into the house at about 1:12 p.m.,” said Battalion Chief Justin Cassel.

    No one was hurt during the fire, though the kitchen sustained heavy fire damage. The entire house also received a lot of smoke damage.

    “The whole house was full of smoke when we arrived and flames were rolling out of the kitchen by the time we made entry,” Lopez said.

    Deputy Chief Justin Grider said the situation was under control by 1:20 p.m.

    Grider said the heavy smoke affected two families and the homeowner was the one who made the 911 call. Mojica was outside the duplex when fire crews arrived on the scene, and no one was injured in the fire.

    Lopez said electrical fires are pretty rare.

  • Update 11-30-12

    Arts and Crafts

    The Christmas Arts and Crafts Fair will be at 9 a.m. Saturday at Knights of Columbus Hall on DP Road. The event runs until 3 p.m.

    Kiwanis meeting

    Kiwanis meets each Tuesday, noon to 1 p.m., at the Masonic Temple, on Sage, near the intersection of 15th and Canyon. On Dec. 4, Linda Deck, director of the Bradbury Science Museum, will speak on the current displays at the museum.

    Sponsor a family

    The Family YMCA is sponsoring four families for the holidays and welcomes the community to participate by taking part in the Giving Tree. For more information call the Y at 662-3100.

    DWI council

    The Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council will meet at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 11 at the Los Alamos Police Department Training Room, 2500 Trinity Dr., Suite A.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

  • DOE hosts Native American celebration

    November is Native American Heritage Month, but every day is an opportunity to learn more about the ethnic and cultural groups with roots that date back thousands of years here in this land that became the United States.
    As President Barack Obama said in a November 2012 proclamation:

    “As the first people to live on the land we all cherish, American Indians and Alaska Natives have profoundly shaped our country’s character and our cultural heritage.”

    This week, DOE held a celebratory event recognizing contributions Native Americans have made to this country and to DOE’s mission. The keynote speaker was Patty Talahongva, a veteran journalist and member of the Hopi tribe.

    Talahongva is a founding member of the Hopi Education Endowment Fund and past president of the Native American Journalists Association.

    Also during the event, Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga spoke about EM’s ongoing relationships with tribal groups across the country. EM has cooperative agreements with more than a dozen tribes throughout the U.S. near various EM field sites. Huizenga emphasized his personal commitment to visit with the tribes on their lands and in their communities to better understand their values, cultures and concerns.