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Local News

  • Raw: Gang Rape Protesters Clash With Police

    Police in India's capital used tear gas and water cannons to push back thousands of people who tried to march to the presidential mansion to protest the gang rape and brutal beating of a 23-year-old student on a moving bus.

  • Today in History for December 23rd
  • Update 12-23-12

    Monitor closed

    The Los Alamos Monitor office will be closed on Christmas and New Year’s Day.

    No blue bus service

    The NCRTD blue buses will not be in service Chrismas day and New Year’s day. For more information call toll free 1-866-206-0754, or visit ridethebluebus.com.

    Holiday dance

    The Los Alamos Big Band will present their annual Christmas Dance from 7:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Thursday at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Admission is free.

    Live nativity

    There will be a living nativity staged in the United Church parking lot at 5 p.m. Monday Greet the holy family, the shepherds and kings and pet the stable animals. There will also be a candlelight service at 4 p.m. and one at 11 p.m.

    Have a news tip?

    Send press releases, photos and videos to laeditor@lamonitor.com or contact the newsroom at 662-4185.

  • Frosty leans into it
  • First Born Helps First-Time Parents

    Alison Ticknor, a telecommunications engineer, had degrees in physics, engineering management and art, but no formal training to become a mom. “I wanted to be a good mother, but I just didn’t know the details,” she said.

    Her husband, Dr. Chris Ticknor, came to Los Alamos as a post-doctoral fellow from the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia and can write papers about “finite temperature analysis of a quasi2D dipolar gas,” but the man colleagues once called “Spiderman” had no degree in parenting.

    When they moved to Los Alamos, Alison was pregnant and learned about First Born®, which has supported the couple through the first two and a half years of daughter Nora’s life – and the two months before she was born. The giggling toddler will “graduate” at three, with her parents assured that she is on track to a healthy life.

    First Born is a project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation, using a model that shows that if first time parents learn solid skills in the first three years of a child’s life, that child and future children will be more successful.

    First Born parents are also more likely to plan the birth of their second child.

  • Albuquerque airport to close long-term parking lot

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Officials are preparing for a reconstruction project at the Albuquerque International Sunport and that means the long-term parking lot will be closed for about five months.

    Airport officials say the lot will be closed starting the day after Christmas in order to have the space emptied by the time construction is scheduled to start in mid-January.

    The $5 million reconstruction project will include repaving of the entire lot and the addition of solar panels that will also serve as shade canopies. A grant is helping pay for the solar panels.

    Officials say the construction has been scheduled for what is traditionally a slow time between the holidays and summer travel season.

    The airport is offering alternative parking at the same rate in a lot off Girard east of the terminal.

  • Today in History for December 22nd
  • Mexico frees ex-Marine jailed for bringing in gun

    MIAMI (AP) — A Marine veteran jailed for months in Mexico after trying to carry a family heirloom shotgun across the border has been freed, U.S. officials and his lawyer said late Friday.

    The attorney for 27-year-old Jon Hammar tweeted Friday night that his client had been released from a detention center in Matamoros, Mexico.

    "Jon is out, going home!" Eddie Varon Levy tweeted.

    Patrick Ventrell, the acting deputy spokesman for the State Department, confirmed Hammer's release and return to the U.S. in a statement Friday night.

    "Officials from the U.S. Consulate General in Matamoros met him at the prison and escorted him to the U.S. border, where he was reunited with members of his family," the statement said. "We sincerely appreciate the efforts on the part of Mexican authorities to ensure that an appropriate resolution was made in accordance with Mexican law, and that Mr. Hammar will be free to spend the holidays with his loved ones."

  • NNSA orders security crackdown at lab

    The National Nuclear Security Administration has directed Los Alamos National Laboratory to increase its security, effective immediately.

    LANL officials, however, will not say why the extra precautions are being taken.

    “When there are changes to the security posture of the laboratory, we do not discuss the details,” lab spokesman Kevin Roark said.

    A source close to the situation said that the NNSA directive was solely for LANL and not for any of the other Department of Energy sites.

    He declined to say if the order had anything to do with a faulty $213 million security system that is being installed around Technical Area 55, the lab’s most sensitive nuclear facilities.

    The system was supposed to be up and running this summer. But officials now say it will take an additional $41 million and another six months.

    Last month, five security workers were fired for taking unauthorized visitors to a shooting range.

    Because of this government order, until further notice all vehicles entering government property will be required to stop at the East and West Jemez Road “Vehicle Access Portals” (VAPs) for a vehicle check. Pajarito Road remains open to government badge holders only, so vehicles are already required to stop at the Pajarito Road VAPs, and this will not change.

  • D'Agostino stepping down from NNSA administrator post

    The National Nuclear Security Admninistration has confirmed that administrator Thom D’Agostino will be leaving his post Jan. 18.

    D’Agostino said NNSA Principal Deputy Administrator Neile Miller will become acting administrator and acting undersecretary for nuclear security.

    D’Agostino is leaving after more than 36 yearsof federal service, including the last five and one-half years as the NNSA Administrator and Under Secretary for Nuclear Security, and two years as Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs.

    “My wife Beth and I have decided the timing is right for me to leave Federal service,” he said. “This was a difficult decision for me as I am committed to serving our country, committed to the missions of the NNSA, the Environmental Management Organization, the Office of Legacy Management, and I am committed to you in carrying out this mission.  

    “However, I have an equally important commitment to my wife and family and I am a strong believer that organizations are healthier when leadership changes on a periodic basis.  The time is right for this change and I will step down from this position on 18 January 2013, at the end of the first term of the Obama Administration.”

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu also released a statement.