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Local News

  • Today in History for January 1st
  • Raw: New York Rings in the New Year
  • NM ends year with welcomed blanket of snow

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A thin layer of snow blanketed parts of New Mexico on Monday to wrap up what has been one of the driest and warmest years on record for the state.

    Snow fell along Interstate 25 near the Colorado border through midday, keeping state highway crews busy spreading salt and cinder to ease what had started out as a treacherous day of travel for some.

    Difficult driving conditions were reported early along parts of I-25 and along Interstate 40 in the east. At Pino's Truck Stop in Las Vegas, N.M., employees said the parking lot was full of drivers who didn't want to chance the snow-packed and icy conditions being reported at Raton Pass and near Glorieta outside of Santa Fe.

    The sun peeked out from behind the clouds by the afternoon, clearing the roads and leaving behind only frigid temperatures.

    "When I came in at 5:30 this morning, I couldn't even see," Deborah Montano said of her hour-and-a-half commute through the snow to Clines Corners, a popular rest stop along I-40. "But it's dry now, like it never even happened."

  • Today in History for December 31st
  • Hillary Clinton hospitalized with blood clot

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has been admitted to a New York hospital after the discovery of a blood clot stemming from the concussion she sustained earlier this month.

    Clinton spokesman Philippe Reines says her doctors discovered the clot during a follow-up exam Sunday. Reines says Clinton is being treated with anti-coagulants.

    Clinton was admitted to New York-Presbyterian Hospital so doctors can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours.

    Reines says doctors will continue to assess Clinton's condition, "including other issues associated with her concussion."

  • 9 Killed in Oregon Tour Bus Crash on I-84
  • NM mother found son after fatal dog attack

    PINE HILL, N.M. (AP) — An 8-year-old boy in northwestern New Mexico who died after being mauled by dogs was found face-down and unresponsive by his mother, a police official said Sunday.

    Cibola County Undersheriff Tony Mace said one of the nine dogs captured and euthanized after the attack had belonged to boy's family and was reported to have bitten the child on a previous occasion. "It's a horrible, horrible situation," Mace said of the child's death.

    Tomas Jay Henio died Wednesday near his family's home in Pine Hill, located more than 100 miles west of Albuquerque.

    The family dog and eight strays were euthanized.

    Authorities will gather DNA samples from the euthanized dogs to determine which ones were involved in the attack.

    The sheriff's office played an assisting role in the case by sending an animal control officer to round up the dogs and isn't investigating the child's death.

  • Today in History for December 30th
  • A note from the Los Alamos Monitor's publisher

    From all of us at the Los Alamos Monitor to all of our readers and advertisers, we want to wish each of you a very happy and prosperous 2013!

    As this new year dawns, 2013 is a significant one for the Los Alamos Monitor because it will mark the news operation’s 50th anniversary. Fifty years is a milestone in a person’s life, in the life of a relationship and in the life of a business, as well.

    The Los Alamos Monitor published its first edition Thursday, March 7, 1963. As the newspaper has chronicled the life of this community over the course of the last 50 years, one constant has remained steadfast throughout that time: change.
    As we turn the page today and begin looking ahead to the next 50 years, the Los Alamos Monitor has grown and evolved right along with the community it serves. Now, more than just a newspaper, the Los Alamos Monitor and its online counterpart, LAMonitor.com, have converged to become a multimedia news and information organization with the ability to reach out and touch audiences around the globe. During 2012, LAMonitor.com hosted more than 232,000 unique visitors, who came to the site nearly a million times and generated more than 2.2 million pageviews.

  • LANL rounds out top five science stories

    Second of a two-part series

    DOE, NASA team demonstrates simple fission reactor prototype (DUFF)

    A team of researchers recently demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and power a Stirling engine at the Nevada National Security Site’s Device Assembly Facility near Las Vegas. The Demonstration Using Flattop Fissions experiment produced 24 watts of electricity. Engineers from Los Alamos, the NASA Glenn Research Center and National Security Technologies LLC conducted the experiment.

    Heat-pipe technology — a sealed tube with an internal fluid that can efficiently transfer heat produced by a reactor with no moving parts — was invented at Los Alamos in 1963. Using heat pipes in tandem with the simple, closed-loop technology of Stirling engines allowed for creation of a reliable electric power supply that can be adapted for space applications.