.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society is pleased to announce the publication of “The Forgotten Physicist: Robert Bacher, 1905-2004” by Los Alamos National Laboratory historian Alan B. Carr.

    The book describes the life and career of a man frequently mentioned in other books about the Manhattan Project but whose importance to that project and the atomic era has not been presented in depth until now.

    During an interview in 1993, Hans Bethe described Bacher as “the most important person (at Los Alamos) next to Oppenheimer.”

  • Plastic bags have really left a mark on the environment. They are made from petroleum, harmful to animals, and rather than bio-degrading, plastic bags are photodegradable; the sun breaks the bags into smaller and smaller parts, but these pieces never go away.

    As a result, members of the Pajarito Envrionmental Education Center’s Kinnikinnick Club, a nature club for students in grade four through six, are working to wipe away the mark left by plastic bags on the environment.

  • Classical and folk art, along with history, are intertwined within delicate and elaborate patterns of lace in the “Handmade Lace: From Fine Art to Folk Art” exhibit at Mesa Public Library.

    If visitors are looking at the black Spanish mantilla or the 1680 Italian “snow lace” and wonder just how these pieces of art were created, an answer will be provided soon. The New Mexico Enchanted Lacers will host demonstrations on lace-making techniques all day Saturday at the library.

  • You watched the match, right? Clicked the TV on at 7 a.m. Sunday morning, without even lifting your head? Eventually rubbed your eyes, rolled your pillow in half so you could lean back on it and see the screen, and realized you forgot to take your contacts out the night before?

    You watched what many people are saying was the best tennis match ever.

  • Wondering what is the sweetest class that the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will be offering this summer? Without a doubt, it is the classes on beekeeping with local honey man Scott Mills of Mariposa Apiaries in Los Alamos.

    The first of the two classes is offered for those who are interested in learning more about honeybees and beekeeping in general. Topics in this two-hour introductory course will include life inside the beehive, the honeybee life cycle, the importance of honeybees, and protective clothing and basic equipment needed for getting started.

  • Everyone’s career has some type of significance; whether it is a trash collector who ensures neighborhoods and city streets remain sanitary and clean or a police officer who maintains everyone’s safety. From the long list of potential occupations to support through a scholarship, Steve and Barbara Stoddard selected two – teaching and nursing.

  • Going through cancer treatment changes how a person looks and feels. This, in turn, can modify ones’ actions, relationships and life. If you are going through cancer treatment and want to be more comfortable in society again, realize you are not alone.

    A 2006 on-line survey conducted by the Cincinnati-based research firm R.L. Repass & Partners Inc. showed that a 69 percent majority of 400 female cancer patients said their appearance changed either somewhat or a lot during chemotherapy or radiation.

  • To anyone who thinks a library is just books, its time to look between the shelves because the Los Alamos County Library System is about to prove just how cool it really is. The rock ’n’ roll band, The High Strung is coming to perform, along with the local band, The Small Town Lab Rats.

    The free concert will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge and is sponsored by the county libraries and funded in part by the Friends of the Library.

  • “The Marriage of Figaro” has been one of the world’s most popular operas almost since its first production in Vienna 222 years ago. Through Mozart’s immortal music, never more sublimely simple, and the revolutionary, politically-incorrect play of Beaumarchais, the complex depths of the human heart are plumbed under the deceptively pleasing guise of romantic farce. Nobody dies, true love triumphs and everyone is paired off appropriately.

  • Possessing intellect is not the only vital component to being successful in science; having fun is also essential.

    A team of Los Alamos Middle School eighth-graders put this theory to the test during the regional and national Science Bowl competitions, and their conclusion revealed enjoyment and brains are equally important.