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Today's Features

  • Friday the Art Center at Fuller Lodge celebrates the Members’ Best exhibit with an opening reception from 5-7 p.m. From crafts to fine arts, from whimsical to serious, Members’ Best is a bold testament to the wealth of artistic talent residing in the community.

  • “Stranger Than Fiction,” playing this week at Mesa Public Library, is one of my favorite movies. How can I review it? I gave up any objectivity very early in the film, about the time Harold Crick’s wristwatch had an opinion about the single Windsor knot in Harold’s necktie.

    The wristwatch is funny, but Harold, played by Will Ferrell, or possibly his secret, stoic twin brother, is not.

  • Los Alamos is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2009, and to commemorate the event, the anniversary committee hopes to involve every group, club and organization in town.

    To accomplish this, the 60th anniversary committee, in conjunction with the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce, is seeking the help of organizations to update a list of community resources.

  • So this is it. I ate my cookie. I drank a big gulp of soymilk. And now I’m writing what is most likely my last “Thinking Makes It So.”

    There are some of you, I know, who are probably thinking, “Well, it’s about time. I hate this column, and yet I read it nearly every week. Why do I do that? Anyhow, it will be great to have my Thursday nights back.”

    I free you, disgruntled readers! From now on, read something you truly enjoy.

  • Having Oprah Winfrey be associated with a book can definitely push it into the spotlight.

    Bret Lott, the bestselling author of “Jewel” and “The Difference between Women and Men” and the editor of “The Southern Review,” can attest to Winfrey’s literary power.

  • The mission and the operation remain identical to previous years, but this year’s Relay for Life, Los Alamos has a new appearance.

    Before, the event was held in conjunction to the Los Alamos Summer Concert series and set at Ashley Pond.

    However, event chair Hilde Fitzgerald explained there were some safety concerns about the pond setting and with the municipal building being torn down right next door.

    “I needed a plan B,” she said.

  • Having new school supplies can be the difference between starting off the school year with a good attitude or a bad one, said Judith Magelssen, coordinator of supplies for the ECLA and Self Help Inc. School Supply Project.

    She said she has taught in the Pojoaque for eight years and would see some students come in with no supplies, which can hurt when they are with their peers. However, after a visit to the counselor’s office to pick up the needed items, courtesy of the School Supply Project, Magelssen said students return with big smiles.

  • George Fredric Handel’s “Radamisto” opened for the first time at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday evening, only a dozen short of 300 years after its’ premier performance in London.

    Although Beaumarchais would not write his revolutionary bedroom farce (“The Marriage of Figaro” also playing this summer!) for nearly 60 more years, the plots of the two operas seemed ironically similar: Lord-and-master spurns his beautiful, loving wife, to pursue less-powerful-but-more-admirable man’s also beautiful and faithful wife.

  • One hundred fourteen young performers filled up Duane Smith Auditorium Monday for the chance to make it in the spotlight. At the end of the day, 59 thespians were selected to be a part of Missoula Children’s Theatre’s production of “Robin Hood.”

    These actors may have made it, but there is still a lot of work ahead for the cast. The performance will take place at 7 p.m. Saturday in Duane Smith Auditorium.

    Despite the heavy workload, tour actors/directors Evan and Emily Karlewicz are excited to begin.

  • Wile E. Coyote always got dealt a bad hand. The skinny as a stick Warner Bros. ACME cartoon character with a ravenous appetite for roadrunners, developed some ingenious inventions and methods to kill the speedy bird. But despite all of Wile’s smarts, every one of his ideas blew up on him, or fell on him, or flattened him, while the bird zoomed on, unharmed.

    Well, not anymore.