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Today's Features

  • Wednesday
    Increasing atmospheric temperature is causing droughts to become more severe and is driving an acceleration of forest mortality throughout the Earth. Climate scientist Nathan Mcdowell will review this evidence both for the Southwest United States and other locations globally, with data from the level of individual plants to the earth, during the Sierrans meeting at 7 p.m. in Media Room 203, building 2, at UNM-LA.
    Thursday
    The March meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. at the White Rock Town Hall. Discussion will be plans for the Hope Garden.

  • There’s only a few weeks until spring break! What? Where did October through February go?
    Our asset category for the month of March is positive values. The assets in this category include numbers 26 through 31.
    They are caring, equality and social justice, integrity, honesty, responsibility and restraint.
    Later this month, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board will host a training session on restorative justice for local and statewide programs.
    Restorative justice is a comprehensive look at an infraction that includes admitting responsibility, being held accountable, having a consequence and rebuilding the relationship with the party that he or she has harmed.
    This is a program that has success because of several reasons. One of the most important reasons is because everyone is heard during the process.
    The process puts everyone on a level playing field, makes sure there is understanding and gives the offender a chance to earn back their way.
    The model is already used locally in classrooms, for criminal issues with youth and non-criminal issues, before they escalate.
    You can learn about restorative justice, but it is most beneficial when you are part of the process. You can’t just sit and watch a restorative justice circle, but you can act as a community member.

  • Nathan Phillips, a junior at Los Alamos HIgh School, received the Outstanding Young Adult Patroller award for the Rocky Mountain Division of the National Ski Patrol during the Young Adult Patroller Jamboree Feb. 23-24.
    Phillips and two other young adult patrollers from Pajarito Mountain Ski Patrol, Cameron Guy and JoAnna O’Neill, participated in ski clinics and ski patrol avalanche scenarios during the two-day event, which was at Taos Ski Valley Resort. Assistant Patrol Directors Mike O’Neill and Eric Schaller, as well as patrollers Kathy Brooks, Dave Phillips, John Guy, Steve and Julie Maze, accompanied them.
    “We are glad to have Nathan on the patrol,” said patrol director Bill Somers. He has done an exceptional job for us during the past two years and the patrol is very proud that he was selected for this prestigious honor.”
    The patrol also received the YAP Best Practices Award. Somers praised patrollers Brooks and Maze for their work on this and noted that judges had called their program “a great example of forward thinking and unselfish dedication.”
    Phillips, Steve and Julie Maze are Pajarito’s new YAP advisors. Phillips is the new Rocky Mountain Division YAP advisor.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.
    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets, petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    This would be a wonderful time to consider giving a home to one of the animals in the shelter.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped.

  • March 3-9, 2013
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:30, 10:30 a.m. Tax preparation
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chicken fried steak
    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Beer battered cod
    12:15 p.m. Better breathers
    1:30 p.m. MyCD workshop
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • St. Dimitri Orthodox Church will host its Annual Blini Breakfast March 17.
    Russian blini, a type of thin pancake, will be served in traditional style with smoked salmon, herring, butter and sour cream. Vegetable caviar, eggs, cheese and a variety of berry preserves will also be available.
    Blini are traditionally served in Slavic households during the week before the beginning of the Lenten Fast. Thin crepe-like pancakes are traditionally eaten with fish, sour cream and butter in order to consume all these foods before the beginning of Great Lent.
    Fish and dairy products, along with meat, are not eaten during the 40-day Great Fast period preceding Easter or Pascha, as it is called among Orthodox Christians. The practice was recorded in Biblical times, Christ having fasted in the desert for 40 days.
    The practice of “fasting, together with prayer, almsgiving and the preparation that the additional services during Lent, is the true readying for the great feast of Pascha, the Resurrection of Our Lord,” said Fr. John Hennies, attached priest of St. Dimitri Orthodox Church.

  •  

    Art openings

     

    Peter Christian Johnson and Todd Volz will share Santa Fe Clay’s gallery through April 20. Their show will open with a reception at 5 p.m. March 8 at Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia, Santa Fe. 

     

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces an exhibition and paintings by Michael Freitas Wood, titled, “Presentiment.” The exhibit will be up March 29-April 29 at 435 S. Guadalupe St. There will be a reception from 5-7 p.m. March 29.

  •  

    The Los Alamos Arts Council’s free Brown Bag Performance Series will feature Black Mesa Brass at noon March 6. in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge.  

    The Black Mesa Brass Quintet was formed in 1990 and still has three of the original five members. Their repertoire is a mix of classical, modern, pop and jazz tunes. They play a variety of venues including concerts, educational performances at schools, weddings and other special occasions. Jan McDonald, John Hargreaves, Jerry Morzinski, Larry Bronisz and Bruce Letellier make up the quintet. Their collective musical experience is on the order of 240 years. 

  •  

    Spring is right around the corner and it’s time to start thinking about vegetable gardening.  Carlos Valdez comes to PEEC at 7 p.m. March 7 to talk about Vegetable ABCs. The talk is free and open to the public.

    The last and first frost used to be the beginning and end of the vegetable gardening season — but not anymore. This program will provide the knowledge necessary for growing food during every month of the year.

    Learn season-defying techniques to garden where summers are short and low levels of winter sunlight create the ultimate challenge.

    Year-round gardens are doable and affordable for gardeners in any location where frost has traditionally defined the growing season.