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Today's Features

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    “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die” is a title that’s bound to pique just about anyone’s interest. And because the book is penned by Willie Nelson, that makes it even that much more interesting.

    Nelson is probably best known for his movie roles and for being one of the Highway Men, along with Kris Kristofferson, Waylon Jennings and Johnny Cash. But who would have thought that in addition to his acting and singing careers, he’s also found time to write a book or two? Actually, he’s written more than just a couple. He wrote a fiction piece titled, “A Tale Out of Luck,” but he’s also authored “The Tao of Willie: A Guide to the Happiness in Your Heart) with Turk Pipkin; “The Facts of Life and Other Dirty Jokes” and “Willie: An Autobiography” with Bud Shrake. His latest book, “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die” was written in 2012. Kinky Friedman supplies the foreword and Nelson’s son Micah, provides illustrations for the book.

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    Many people learn how to rock climb the hard way. If you ask them how they learned to climb, their answers might include “my buddy, Ernie,” “it was a great day, but,” and “the best thing in my life.” 

    They may also utter phrases like “but I kept at it anyway,” “after that I went back and bought better (shoes, harness, rope),” and “we didn’t really know what we were doing, but we had a great time and we’re still alive.” Though seat-of-the-pants and trial-by-fire work for some intrepid souls, most would prefer less struggle and better results, as offered by the long-running Los Alamos Mountaineers’ Rock Climbing School. 

    The 2013 school runs from March 26-May 4, with an application deadline of March 17. Teams of experienced local climbers will teach students what they need to be competent and safe on the high-angle out-of doors. 

  • Today
    Increasing atmospheric temperature is causing droughts to become more severe and is driving an acceleration of forest mortality throughout the Earth. Climate scientist Nathan Mcdowell will review this evidence both for the Southwest United States and other locations globally, with data from the level of individual plants to the earth, during the Sierrans meeting at 7 p.m. in Media Room 203, building 2, at UNM-LA.
    Thursday
     Assets In Action will cure culinary sparks at the Teen Center at 3:15 p.m., making desserts with students to promote community partners as spring nears. Students can also make nominations for the Hubba Bubba Awards and get information about Cookies and Conversation.

    The March meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. at the White Rock Town Hall. Discussion will be plans for the Hope Garden.

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center from 7:30-9 p.m. Sunday at the White Rock Overlook Park ball fields, to see a comet, Jupiter, galaxies and more.
    PEEC will have several telescopes set up for viewing and the event is free and open to the public.
    Comet Pan-STARRS might be in the sky right after sundown. After the comet sets, Jupiter will come into view. Participants will also be able to see several galaxies, the Orion Nebula and open and globular clusters and what is called zodiacal light. Zodiacal light is sunlight scattered off interplanetary dust in the inner solar system.
    Before and during the viewing, astronomers from PEEC will discuss the shape of the solar system and galaxy and point out how each object participants are seeing fits into the astronomical big picture.
    Be sure to bundle up, as it will be cold, especially once the sun goes down.
    For more information, contact PEEC at pajaritoEEC.org, 662-0460, or Programs@PajaritoEEC.org. 

  • With Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Tim Wilkinson and Maggie Smith amongst a captivating ensemble cast and the rainbow of Jaipur, India, as its setting, “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” is a wonderful choice for this week’s installment of Mesa Public Library’s Free Film Series.
    The film follows seven British senior citizens as they leave everything familiar behind and head to an Indian hotel for the “elderly and beautiful.” Graham (Wilkinson), a high court judge, is the only one who has been to Jaipur previously. The rest are experiencing something completely new, from forms of transportation and rules of the road, to how to digest an Indian diet and the idea that in India, “there is always room.”
    Doug (Nighy) and his wife Jean (Penelope Wilton) come to Jaipur after investing most of their retirement savings in their daughter’s Internet start-up. The Marigold is all they can afford. After paying off her husband’s debts, recently widowed Evelyn (Dench) is also short on cash.
    Madge (Celia Imrie) has plenty of money, but is alone and hoping to meet someone to grow old with. Norman (Ronald Pickup) is a sly old dog looking not for love, but simply one really excellent night.
    Muriel (Smith) is a racist in need of a hip.

  • The Los Alamos Middle School student council spends their days learning about leadership and then turns that knowledge into action on campus and in the community, through various projects.
    Recently, the team raised a total of $1,341.45 to benefit Pennies For Patients sponsored by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.
    LAMS teacher and Hawk Hubba Bubba recipient, Linda Bennett, works with the students to achieve their goals.
    The students held a raffle to assist the fundraising, selling tickets during lunch for a chance to win prizes, made by student council members.
    The project raised, $95.66 for the campaign after students were inspired by Leukemia and Lymphoma Society videos, which explained the importance of their fundraising efforts.
    “They got the entire campus involved with Pennies For Patients by promoting a pizza party contest between the eighth period classes and raffling off theme baskets to raise even more money,” Bennett said. “The Student Council Members were so excited to pick up the money and count it every day.”
    “I loved the feeling that I have helped to save someone’s life,” eighth grader Louisa Belian said.

  • Wednesday
    Increasing atmospheric temperature is causing droughts to become more severe and is driving an acceleration of forest mortality throughout the Earth. Climate scientist Nathan Mcdowell will review this evidence both for the Southwest United States and other locations globally, with data from the level of individual plants to the earth, during the Sierrans meeting at 7 p.m. in Media Room 203, building 2, at UNM-LA.
    Thursday
    The March meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be at 7 p.m. at the White Rock Town Hall. Discussion will be plans for the Hope Garden.

  • There’s only a few weeks until spring break! What? Where did October through February go?
    Our asset category for the month of March is positive values. The assets in this category include numbers 26 through 31.
    They are caring, equality and social justice, integrity, honesty, responsibility and restraint.
    Later this month, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board will host a training session on restorative justice for local and statewide programs.
    Restorative justice is a comprehensive look at an infraction that includes admitting responsibility, being held accountable, having a consequence and rebuilding the relationship with the party that he or she has harmed.
    This is a program that has success because of several reasons. One of the most important reasons is because everyone is heard during the process.
    The process puts everyone on a level playing field, makes sure there is understanding and gives the offender a chance to earn back their way.
    The model is already used locally in classrooms, for criminal issues with youth and non-criminal issues, before they escalate.
    You can learn about restorative justice, but it is most beneficial when you are part of the process. You can’t just sit and watch a restorative justice circle, but you can act as a community member.

  • Nathan Phillips, a junior at Los Alamos HIgh School, received the Outstanding Young Adult Patroller award for the Rocky Mountain Division of the National Ski Patrol during the Young Adult Patroller Jamboree Feb. 23-24.
    Phillips and two other young adult patrollers from Pajarito Mountain Ski Patrol, Cameron Guy and JoAnna O’Neill, participated in ski clinics and ski patrol avalanche scenarios during the two-day event, which was at Taos Ski Valley Resort. Assistant Patrol Directors Mike O’Neill and Eric Schaller, as well as patrollers Kathy Brooks, Dave Phillips, John Guy, Steve and Julie Maze, accompanied them.
    “We are glad to have Nathan on the patrol,” said patrol director Bill Somers. He has done an exceptional job for us during the past two years and the patrol is very proud that he was selected for this prestigious honor.”
    The patrol also received the YAP Best Practices Award. Somers praised patrollers Brooks and Maze for their work on this and noted that judges had called their program “a great example of forward thinking and unselfish dedication.”
    Phillips, Steve and Julie Maze are Pajarito’s new YAP advisors. Phillips is the new Rocky Mountain Division YAP advisor.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of onsite adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. Others are currently off-campus in loving foster homes.
    Be sure to visit the Friends of the Shelter website, lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    Also check out the Petfinder page for pictures and to learn more about all of the adoptable pets, petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    This would be a wonderful time to consider giving a home to one of the animals in the shelter.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped.