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Today's Features

  • Jan. 6-12, 2013
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken fried steak
    7 p.m.    Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: New England clam chowder
    7 p.m.     Bridge
    7:30 p.m.     Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    RSVP quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10 a.m.    Orientation for Strong People
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Pork chop with apple barbecue sauce
    1:15 p.m.    Socrates Café
    1:15 p.m.    Alzheimer’s support
    1:30 p.m.    Daytime duplicate bridge
    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m.    Walk in the woods
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • What makes Orthodox Christianity different from other churches? — A.A.

    Western Christians easily observe that Orthodox Christians believe, understand and do things uniquely and then label them as “differences.”
    For Orthodox, we simply see ourselves as continuing in that which we received from Christ more than 2,000 years ago.
    Since there have been violent conflicts between Western groups over “differences,” the presupposition of violent disagreement gets projected onto the Orthodox.
    The Orthodox get oversimplified as “just another “different” Christian group caught in the trappings of “differences.”
    This is a logical fallacy, which prevents one from really examining Orthodoxy. Nevertheless, I will focus on two internal distinctions, rather than on external trappings.
    As a convert, I have observed two distinctions, which sets Orthodoxy apart from other Christian groups. The first is a certain preservation of the seriousness and profundity of God, his incarnation, and his effects on humanity and the cosmos.
    The profundity and radical sense of “the holy,” totally transforms each individual.

  •  

    Art exhibits

     

    “New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Mas,” is on exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, through Jan. 5. For more information, visit internationalfolkart.org.

     

    Taos artist Maye Torres will exhibit “Maye Torres: Unbound,” at the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos. Her one-person exhibit opens Saturday and remains on view through Jan. 27. For more information, visit harwoodmuseum.org or call 575-758-9826.

     

  •  

    Theatre Lovers Community, an arm of the Albuquerque Theatre Guild, presents a panel discussion by local theatre costumers, from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Feb. 2 at Musical Theatre Southwest’s Center for Theatre, 6320-B Domingo NE (just south of Expo NM). 

    Participants will learn how these sorcerers of the sewing needle get their inspiration and experience, about their most challenging projects and worst disasters, what it is like working with actors and more.
    “Ever wonder who dreamed up that gorgeous costume on the ingénue? What makes the villain look so evil?” asks Kay Grant, founder of Theatre Lovers Community. 

    Panel participants include:

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    Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center for a winter hike or snowshoe along the East Fork Trail Jan. 13. Michael Altherr, experienced hiker and skier, will lead this outing, which will meet at PEEC at 9:15 a.m. and return around 3 p.m.

    This winter hike or snowshoe (weather-dependent) will lead participants along the East Fork Trail from Las Conchas to the East Fork Trailhead. The trail follows the meandering East Fork of the Jemez River for approximately two miles before climbing up to the top of the mesa. 

    Then it descends almost imperceptibly through quiet woodland for about three miles, ending back at the trailhead on N.M. 4.  Hikers can expect one rise of significance (~450 feet in ¾ mile) with an obstacle (cattle gate) near the top.

  •  

    The Los Alamos Historical Society presents its 2012-2013 lecture series, “History and Science,” at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 8, featuring Dr. Jack Shlacter at Fuller Lodge.

    A snapshot of the Theoretical Division at Los Alamos in 1945 reveals a leadership structure that is disproportionately of Jewish heritage; the division leader, deputy division leader, chief consultant and six of the eight group leaders were “Jewish” by some definition of the term. 

    Of the roughly 80 individuals in the division, four (all “Jewish”) would go on to become Nobel Laureates. These individuals’ backgrounds and connections to Judaism were varied. In this talk, Shlachter will explore members of this leadership team and speculate on the connection between their presence at Los Alamos and their Jewish roots.

  •  

    Take a break from all the fiscal cliff hoopla and travel back in time, to a different political era with Los Alamos Little Theatre’s production of “Frost/Nixon.”

    The show is directed by Courtney Lounsbury and starring Grady Hughes  as Richard Nixon and Don Monteith as David Frost.

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    Friday

    The Fuller Lodge Art Center is seeking art for its first thematic exhibit of the New Year titled, “Behind the Scenes.” There’s a story behind every piece of artwork; something magical in the process of its creation. Create and collaborate to help tell the whole story — and document all steps. Download an application for the show at library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1103899759177-507/CFA_Behind-the-Scenes-form.pdf.

     

    Los Alamos Little Theatre presents “Frost/Nixon,” at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 4,5,11,12,18 and 19; and at 2 p.m. Jan. 13. Tickets are $12 for general admission and $10 for students and seniors. They are available at C.B. Fox or at the door. For more information, visit lalt.org.

  •  

    The League of Women Voters will have their monthly Lunch with a Leader at 11:40 a.m. Jan. 10. The speaker will be Tom Ribe. The event is open to the public.

    Ribe is a native of Los Alamos, raised by long-time League of Women Voters activist Mally Ribe. 

    He worked for Los Alamos National Laboratory between 1992 and 1997 in the Environmental Restoration program. He has his master’s degree in environmental policy from the University of Oregon and has written extensively on energy, public lands and wildfire. 

    His talk will cover Los Alamos’ power sources and urge an update of the electricity supply over the next decade to address climate change.