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Today's Features

  • Los Alamos Middle School has chosen to participate in Read to Feed‚ a reading incentive program designed by Heifer International, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending world hunger and poverty while caring for the Earth.
    Read to Feed allows children to help find solutions to global problems like hunger and poverty.
    LAMS students will record each of the books they read on the back of a sheet, through Dec. 14. Students will ask for pledges for each book they read.  
    A “buck a book,” from their family and friends is recommended, but any amount will be accepted, no matter how small. Cash or checks will be accepted.
    Checks should be made out to LAMS with “Read to Feed” on the memo line. School district policy prohibits canvassing: going door-to-door, to collect pledges.
    The Read to Feed Committee (a group of seventh graders organizing the fundraiser) will decide what kinds of animals to buy through Heifer International.
    Heifer then decides where the need is greatest and provides families and communities with the animals they’ve purchased through the money raised.

  • The 27th annual Los Alamos Heart Council Health Fair was held at Griffith Gymnasium Oct. 27. What a tremendous success. We had close to 1,700 attendees.  
    There were 67 exhibitors representing a wide range of health-related organizations. More than 700 flu shots were given and 307 blood draws were done. Along with many other health screenings, 190 bike helmets were given out to Los Alamos and Northern New Mexico children.  
    The health fair is only possible with the support of many organizations, a large number of volunteers and the broader community. Thanks are due to the Los Alamos Heart Council Board (a United Way community partner), which has put on the health fair every year for 27 years; to the Los Alamos Medical Center, which co-sponsors and assists the Heart Council by covering the costs associated with flu shots and advertising; to the phlebotomists from the medical center; to the Los Alamos Council on Cancer which subsidizes the PSA blood test for men; to the Los Alamos Monitor that publishes the Health Fair guide; to KRSN for their support of community activities such as the Health Fair through their interviews and public service announcements; and to the Tuff Riders for help in fitting the helmets for the kids.  

  • Asset number eight is Youth as Resources — and our focus for this week.
    What ways can you involve youth in decision making? As a part of your home, school, community or business, what input can they provide to make things better?
    The Chamisa Student Council is currently collecting food items to donate to those in need — in and around our community.
    The youth work as decision makers for the school, with the leaders selected to bring the thoughts and concerns of the school to the table.
    They work on a variety of projects including taking collections for non-profits and more importantly, coming up with the list of those organizations, for which to give.
    Often adults may want input from kids, but lead them in decision making by providing all of the information.
    At Chamisa Elementary, fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade representatives staff every class from kindergarten through sixth grade to get their input.
    The students are taught how to ask questions and field answers, regardless of the responses they receive.
    The students then get the final say as to what projects they work on and when they do them.
    The leaders take full responsibility for bringing the decisions back to their classes and promoting the events as they arrive on the calendar.

  • Los Alamos MainStreet is working with the Betty Ehart Senior Center and Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA) to make this the most wonderful time of the year.

    The festivities kicked off with the Festival of Chocolate and rolls into a weeklong event called The Festival of Trees.

    All week, residents are invited to tour the Betty Ehart Senior Center and view (and in some cases) bid on silent auction items.

    While the event is free and open to the public, it is an excellent opportunity to help those in need, during the holiday season.

  • The University of New Mexico at Los Alamos will feature two opportunities for the community to view its student showcase of projects this month, at the campus.

    The first is a Greek Mythology Exhibit that will be from 1-3 p.m. Wednesday. 

    The second takes place on Thursday, with a daytime and early evening reception titled, “UNM-LA on Display.” 

    The event will feature displays and presentations from a variety of students throughout the 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 5 p.m.-8 p.m. showcase.

  • Presley Gao, 10, presented Sally Wilkins, president of Friends of the Shelter, with a $217 check for donations he received for performing a benefit concert Sept. 8.
    Gao began taking piano lessons with Dr. Madeline Williamson on his sixth birthday in 2008. Today, he is performing solo piano recitals more likely found in the repertory of concertizing pianists. 

    He has earned several awards in piano competition, including the Santa Fe Sonata Contest, the District and the New Mexico State Honors Auditions and the Dennis Alexander Piano Competition in Albuquerque. 

    For four years, he has also earned the international level (15 solos) and national level (10 solos) certificates in Guild Auditions.   

  •  While most people in the U.S. are preparing for holiday activities, Los Alamos volunteers with Operation Christmas Child — the world’s largest Christmas project of its kind — are filling shoe box gifts with toys, school supplies and hygiene items for needy children overseas. 

    This year-round project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization, Samaritan’s Purse, headed by Franklin Graham, is ramping up as local businesses, churches and community groups prepare to collect 590 gift-filled shoeboxes during National Collection Week (Nov. 12-19). 

     Anyone can drop off a packed shoebox at the Los Alamos-area collection site. Then, using whatever means necessary — trucks, trains, boats, bikes and even elephants — the shoebox gifts will be hand delivered to children in 100 countries around the world.

  • PAC 8 is hosting its annual Holiday Wine and Cheese Silent Auction and Fundraiser at 7 p.m. Nov. 16 at Fuller Lodge.

    Attendees can do some holiday shopping in one evening, while they taste wines and cheeses from around the world. Items such as sushi making lessons with sushi dinner; ski passes from Pajarito Mountain; a 12 lb. organic turkey from the Los Alamos Co-op; bagels and cream cheese for a year from Ruby K’s, artwork, jewelry, many gift certificates and more will be available for bidding.

    Rumelia, a Balkan/Folk/World female trio from Santa Fe will provide entertainment. Their music is derived from the traditional and popular tunes of Albania, Turkey, Greece, Macedonia and Bulgaria, with some Gypsy music thrown in.

  • Nov. 12-17

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

     

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY

    BESC closed in observance of Veterans Day

    TUESDAY

    8:45 a.m. Variety training

     10:30 a.m. AARP Board mtg.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home. 

    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. 

    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    DOGS