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Today's Features

  • On Saturday, Los Alamos Little Theatre will host the Southwest Rural Theatre Project, performing “The Truth About Santa,” by Greg Kotis.
    This is not holiday fare in the “Miracle on 34th Street” vein, as a philandering Santa has to explain his bastard kids to Mrs. Claus ... and hope to survive her wrathful revenge. Parents,  think “PG-13” before bringing the kids.
    The show was described by one critic as “ ... a play that has every right to become the ‘Christmas Carol’ (or Mahabharata) for weird theater geeks across the world.”
    The New York Times called it “a holiday show for people sick of holiday shows.”
    For those that have been missing their annual shot of melodrama, this performance encourages marshmallow throwing and hissing or booing at the villains of the play.
    Southwest Rural Theatre Project is staging this play at a variety of venues around the state.
    The Los Alamos show will start at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is by donation. Those still wondering what to do New Year’s Eve, might consider going to the opening performance of “Frost/Nixon” by Peter Morgan.

  • The sound of a choir performing Christmas carols is a sure sign that Christmas is near. This choir happens to be composed of instrumentalists — tubas and euphoniums (which can be thought of as small tubas). The group, aptly named the Christmas Tubas, was formed in 2002 by local musician Jerry Morzinski, who gathered other low brass players and played the first concert in the Los Alamos library. The library venue proved to be too small as the group grew over the years to include high school students, typically those who make all-state band. This year, there will be 10 musicians playing a mix of sacred and secular carols, with arrangements specifically created for a tuba-euphonium choir.
    The concert is free, and will be at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church.

  • Michelle Grove’s Los Alamos Middle School crafts students folded 1,000 paper cranes and they are on exhibit at the Mesa Public Library from today through Jan. 20.  
    Students were inspired to make the cranes after reading the book “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes,” by Eleanor Coerr.
    The thousand origami cranes were popularized through the story of Sadako Sasaki, a Japanese girl who was two years old when she was exposed to radiation  from the atomic bombing during World War II. Sasaki soon developed leukemia and, at age 12, inspired by the senbazuru legend, began making origami cranes with the goal of making 1,000.
    In a popular version of the story as told in the book, “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes,” she folded only 644 before her death. In her honor, her classmates felt sorry and agreed to complete the rest for her. In an alternate version of the story, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum states that she did complete the 1,000 cranes and continued past that when her wish did not come true.
    “A thousand origami cranes” is a group of 1,000 origami paper cranes held together by strings. An ancient Japanese legend promises that anyone who folds 1,000 origami cranes will be granted a wish by a crane.

  • The Annual Big Band After Christmas Dance will be from 7:30-10:30 p.m. Dec. 27 at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road, Los Alamos.
    The dance is a memorial for Catherine LeClaire, who was a longtime member of the quartet, the Mountainaires. Proceeds from the dance will be used to purchase a new organ fro the church, in her name.
    Music will feature the Los Alamos Big Band and for this dance, the featured vocalist will be Rene LeClaire, Cathy’s widower. Rene was also a member of the Mountainaires. The Los Alamos Big Band has played at dances throughout Northern New Mexico since 1984, under the direction of Jan McDonald, who for many years, was the bandleader at Los Alamos High School.
    The band features the music of the Big Band era, such as “In the Mood,” String of Pearls,” Sing, Sing, Sing” and “Moonlight Serenade.” They also play other music such as “Moon River,” Latin numbers like “Besame Mucho” and even “Rock Around the Clock.” Several Christmas tunes will be featured at the dance.
    Decorations and refreshments at the dance will be provided by the IHM Youth Group.
    The Big Band started in 1984, when Dick Souder retired from Chrysler in Michigan and started working at Los Alamos National Laboratory.


  • Thursday
    The holiday Farmers Market will be at Fuller Lodge.
    Friday
     Los Alamos Chapter 63, Order of Eastern Star, is selling fruitcakes, apricot pecan and pineapple pecan cakes, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. in the lobby of Los Alamos National Bank. Contact Judy Goldie, 662-3797 or goldienm@comcast.net; Nina Laird, 662-7580; or Betty Robertson, 662-5185, for more information.
    Saturday
    The Los Alamos Little Theatre hosts “The Truth About Santa,” (PG-13) a melodrama about troubles at the North Pole, performed by the Southwest Rural Theatre Project. The show will be at 7:30 p.m. Admission is by donation.
    Dec. 24
    There will be a living nativity staged in the United Church parking lot at 5 p.m. Greet the holy family, the shepards and kings and pet the stable animals. There will also be a candlelight service at 4 p.m. and one at 11 p.m. with the Christmas choir and communion will be served.
    Dec. 27

  • The Youth Activity Center recently acquired a new air hockey table and a new popcorn machine. The air hockey table was donated to the Los Alamos Youth Activity Center by James and Darlene Potter for Marie Koss Potter Warsaw, in memory of her grandson Gregory James Potter.
    James and Darlene also donated a new popcorn machine in memory of their son Gregory James Potter. Greg worked at the Youth Activity Center prior to his passing in 2003.

  • SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — House Speaker Ben Lujan, one of the most powerful and longest serving state legislators in New Mexico history and the father of U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan, died late Tuesday at age 77 after a long battle with lung cancer, a spokesman for his son said.

    He died at about 10:45 p.m. Tuesday after a brief stay at Christus St. Vincent's hospital in Santa Fe, Andrew Stoddard, a spokesman for Congressman Lujan, said early Wednesday.

    The speaker's wife, Carmen, children and grandchildren were at his bedside when he died, Stoddard said.

  • Wednesday

    The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board will meet at 6:15 p.m. at Pajarito Cliffs Site, Building 1, Camino Entrada.
    Thursday
    The holiday Farmers Market will be at Fuller Lodge.
    Friday
     Los Alamos Chapter 63, Order of Eastern Star, is selling fruitcakes, apricot pecan and pineapple pecan cakes, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. in the lobby of Los Alamos National Bank. Contact Judy Goldie, 662-3797 or goldienm@comcast.net; Nina Laird, 662-7580; or Betty Robertson, 662-5185, for more information.
    Saturday
    The Los Alamos Little Theatre hosts “The Truth About Santa,” (PG-13) a melodrama about troubles at the North Pole, performed by the Southwest Rural Theatre Project. The show will be at 7:30 p.m. Admission is by donation.
    Dec. 24
    There will be a living nativity staged in the United Church parking lot at 5 p.m. Greet the holy family, the shepards and kings and pet the stable animals. There will also be a candlelight service at 4 p.m. and one at 11 p.m. with the Christmas choir and communion will be served.
    Dec. 27

  • If you have elementary age students, this week, I hope you look at your teachers a little differently.
    If you have been mad because there was too much or not enough homework; if you push too hard and they don’t push enough, or the other way around, I hope you stop and think.
    Who would have thought that there would ever come a day that the teacher on whose doorstep you dropped your children off at this morning, could become the shield between them and a gunman?
    The questions won’t be answered simply or quickly, but we need to have some discussions.
    We need to stop complaining about everything and everyone, all the time. We need to stop posting every negative thought and idea on Facebook and Twitter.
    Pick two or three friends that you have hard conversations with, the conversations when you pour your troubles and travails out and then keep your thoughts to yourself.
    Stop the vitriol that every negative thought has to be broadcast every minute of everyday. If you need a place to vent frustrations, if nothing seems to remedy itself, then find a member of the clergy no matter what your background or talk to a counselor or a psychiatrist.


  • WASHINGTON (AP) — Recovering from war wounds that left him with one arm, Danny Inouye wanted a cigarette and needed a light.

    The nurse at the Army hospital in Michigan threw a pack of matches on his chest. He wanted to curse her. Instead, she taught him how to light it one-handed.

    "Then she said, 'I'm not going to be around here for the rest of your life. You'll have to learn how to light your own matches, cut your own meat, dress yourself and do everything else. So from now on you're going to be learning,'" Inouye recalled decades later.

    From that moment on it seemed like nothing would stop a determined Daniel K. Inouye, who died Monday after a uniquely American life defined by heroism in war and decades of service in the Senate — and a lifelong love of Hawaii symbolized by his last utterance.

    "Aloha."