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Today's Features

  • There is still time to make reservations for a spot on the Buzz Bus for Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.

    Call 661-RIDE (7433) to request a ride from 8-9 a.m. Friday.

    A reservation is not required for rides on Saturday.

    For information, call 661-RIDE.

    Funding for this year’s Buzz Bus is provided by the Los Alamos County DWI Planning Council.

  • Los Alamos Living Treasure and author Stephanie Sydoriak will presents her book “An Ocean Between: 100% American-100% Ukrainian,” at 2 p.m. March 31 at the Jemez Springs Library.

    Sydoriak was born in 1926 of Ukrainian immigrant parents in Boston, Massachusetts. Her undergraduate degree was in physics from Northeastern University. She continued graduate studies at Yale, but left before obtaining her master’s degree when her husband finished his Ph.D.

    The couple moved to Los Alamos in 1948, where they brought up six children.

    In recognition of her service to Los Alamos, she was named a Los Alamos Living Treasure of 2011.

    She will have copies of her book available for purchase and signing.

  • The Los Alamos Nature Center has two planetarium programs the weekend of March 31: a screening of the full-dome film “Incoming!” at 2 p.m. March 31 and a “Flat Earth Debate” at 2 p.m. April 1.

    The Los Alamos Nature Center, operated by Pajarito Environmental Education Center, will be open from 1-4 p.m. on April 1.

    “Incoming!” traces the paths of comets and asteroids and takes a close-up look at interstellar collisions that have impacted Earth – as well as those still pending.

    What evidence is there for a flat Earth? What evidence is there to establish the true shape of the Earth? Local astronomers will hold a discussion of the Flat Earth theories to answer these questions at 2 p.m. April 1.

    Since most Flat-Earthers claim that space flight has been faked and discount photographs as being too easily manipulated, the discussion will be limited to measurements that can be made from the ground and without photographs.

    For more information about this and future planetarium shows, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. Tickets cost $6 for adults and $4 for children. To reserve tickets, call 662-0460.

  • Usually if someone tells someone else to “take a hike” it’s not a good thing. And they’re certainly not going to give a prize to the other person for following their suggestion.

    But when the Pajarito Environmental Education Center invites someone to take a hike it’s definitely meant in a good way, and there are even prizes given out to encourage people to hit the trails.

    PEEC, located at the Los Alamos Nature Center, loves to get people out on the many area trails so much, it developed its Passport to the Pajarito Plateau Program. The program launched on Earth Day 2016.

    Since then, over 10,000 hikes have been reported back to PEEC through the program, which is free to participants, with over 200 hikers finishing the hikes covered in the passports, of which there are now two.

    “The first passport came out two Earth Days ago and then the newer one came out last year on Earth Day,” said PEEC Executive Director Katy Bruell. “We won’t be rolling out a third one this year on Earth Day. We may at some point, but right now we’re still exploring funding for that.”

    Bruell said the passports – and prizes given for reaching various numbers of hikes completed – cost approximately $20,000, the majority of which covers the prizes.

  • BY ANN MAUZY
    Special to the Monitor

    What a gamble! Because of all the promises that the Duane Smith Auditorium would be ready in time, Los Alamos Light Opera (LALO) bet on late February dates and lost. But Lady Luck was with them, and Crossroads Bible Church agreed to host the romantic comedy “Guys and Dolls” a month later.

    Now, here it is! LALO presents the Tony Award winner from the 1950s in four performances, March 22, 23 and 24.

    When polled by LALO a year ago, theater enthusiasts in Los Alamos chose “Guys and Dolls” as the best bet for an upbeat and family-friendly show with great songs, a large cast, a full orchestra, and dancing.

    Laurie Tomlinson directs the show with favorite music director Gretchen Amstutz and choreographer Brooke Davis.

    “Guys and Dolls” is from a Damon Runyon short story about a couple of New York City gamblers, their rowdy pals, and the girls they fall for. It’s a classic, Tony Award-winning Broadway show, with book by Abe Burrows and Jo Swerling and music and lyrics by Frank Loesser. The full sets built for the Duane Smith Auditorium have been adapted to the new venue to transport the audience to “The Big Apple,” with  its gamblers, street vendors, chorus girls and con artists tempting the many tourists.

  • BY KELLY DOLEJSI
    Special to the Monitor

    Three years ago, Los Alamos Little Theater treated audiences to Peter Gordon’s “Murdered to Death.” This month, thespians will present the eagerly anticipated sequel, “Secondary Cause of Death,” Fridays and Saturdays, beginning this weekend.

    It’s 1939, and Colonel Charles Craddock has inherited Bagshot House, the setting for “Murdered to Death,” which he has remodeled into a hotel. Craddock is less than charmed to welcome Inspector George Algernon Pratt, who arrives once again, this time delivering to the colonel unfortunate news about his mentally unhinged wife. Very soon after, Pratt becomes ensnared in a dangerous and labyrinthine whodunit.

    Questions ensue and almost nobody escapes suspicion.

    Who is the enigmatic Polish count? Is Henrietta really an Army captain? Where does the colorful thespian Cardew Longfellow fit into the picture? And since this is 1939, where does Hitler fit in?

    Joan Maple’s less famous sister Cynthia, the housekeeper, Intelligence agents, and double-agents keep the plot spinning out of control in the best possible way.

  • The Fuller Lodge Art Center will open its newest exhibit “Spirit Lines” from 5-7 p.m. March 23.

    Through a myriad of mixed media, over 40 artists have shown us the spirit within their artwork.

    Whether through totems or religion, Shringar or Wabi Sabi, or even just seeing beauty in the broken parts of the world, “Spirit Lines” captures the soul of each artist on display. The public is invited to by and celebrate life as it is…perfect in its imperfections.

    Compassionate Touch Network will also be opening their exhibit, “PhotoVoice – Untold Minds,” in the Portal Gallery at the same time. This show is a dynamic approach to sharing photos, telling stories, and changing communities. At the heart of “Untold Minds” is the belief in giving voice to the individual and collective experiences of individuals living with serious mental illness.

    Elizabeth Brosha will be playing the harp through the evening. Meet the artists, listen to the music and enjoy free refreshments.

    The exhibits will remain on display through May 5.

  • Art exhibits
    National Museum of Nuclear Science & History has opened a permanent exhibit by American sculptor Jim Sanborn called “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” which recreates the Manhattan Project experiments that determined when plutonium goes “critical in an atomic bomb.” The museum is open seven days a week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and is located at 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, in Albuquerque. Call 505-245-2137 for information, or visit nuclearmuseum.org.

    The Face of Time exhibit open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave., Los Alamos, in the Portal Gallery at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, we will be featuring the work of local artist Jocelyn Warner! Warner’s show, “The Face of Time” will showcase her hand-made clocks, ranging in a variety of media from wood to ceramics. Open through Saturday.

    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

  • Like most of Adam Baker’s paintings, it all started with a gunfight.

    Baker, a painter who commonly depicts Western themes and is active in the reenactment scene in New Mexico, dreamed he was racing across the desert with a friend. They were reenacting a gunfight scene on horseback, giving chase across a dusty landscape. Guns were blazing and it was a chase reminiscent of any cowboy movie.

    There was just one problem: Their horses were metal.

    They were also coin-operated.

    “I woke up laughing.” Baker explains. “I thought, ‘I have to paint that.’”

    Today, the “Quarter” Horse series contains six paintings and will be a prominent part of Adam Baker’s upcoming exhibit at the Karen Wray Gallery. The artist is considering expanding the series out and developing a calendar (the sale of which hopefully won’t require patrons to pay in quarters).

    Humor is nothing new to Baker. He’s perhaps best known for his emotional portrayals of Old West cowboys and gunfighters. But he’ll add light touches and humor whenever it feels appropriate. And if a funny Jack Russell Terrier catches his eye, he’s just as likely to make it a subject of his art. His inspiration is strictly “whatever inspires me lately.”

  • The virtual library meets the actual library in Los Alamos Tuesday, when the Digital Bookmobile pulls into the parking lot to set up shop.

    The Digital Bookmobile is on a coast-to-coast tour, stopping at libraries and schools to tout the benefits of digital reading and listening. The innovative mobile exhibit provides an interactive experience for readers of all ages to explore eBooks and audiobooks available at local public and school libraries.

    Visitors can sample a variety of devices, talk with eReading experts and ask questions of Los Alamos staff about the specifics of the library’s OverDrive program. Tours are free and open to the community, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. March 20, in the upper parking lot at Mesa Public Library.

    A high-tech update to the traditional bookmobile, OverDrive created this vehicle for libraries and schools to promote their digital book collection. Aboard the truck, readers can learn how to borrow digital books – including J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, James Patterson’s Black Book and a million other popular and educational titles.