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Today's Features

  • Paxton is all tail-wagging, toy-squeaking, puppy dog, a kind-hearted American Staffordshire terrier who enjoys a friendly visit with other dogs.

    Rated RTP or “ready to play,” Paxton seems perfectly happy and has plenty of energy, say the folks at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter.

    He is 13 weeks olds and will be equipped with a microchip very soon. He’s been neutered. He was a transfer from another shelter. Due to his youth, his outlook on cats and other issues are unknown.

    This boy will get big, however, and his exercise schedule should be fully booked.

    Adoption fee is $100. Please contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at (505) 662-8179 or communicate police-psa@lacnm.us.
     

  • Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory released 62 newly declassified videos Thursday of atmospheric nuclear tests films.

    The videos are the second batch of scientific test films to be published on the LLNL YouTube channel this year. The team plans to publish the remaining videos of tests conducted by LLNL as they are scanned and approved for public release.

    LLNL nuclear weapon physicist Gregg Spriggs is leading a team of film experts, code developers and interns on a mission to hunt down, scan and reanalyze what they estimate to be 10,000 films of the 210 atmospheric tests conducted by the U.S. between 1945 and 1962.

    With many of the films suffering from physical decay, their goal is to preserve this priceless record before it’s lost forever, and to provide more accurate scientific data to colleagues who are responsible for certifying the stockpile every year.

    “We’ve received a lot of demand for these videos and the public has a right to see this footage,” said Spriggs. “Not only are we preserving history, but we’re getting much more consistent answers with our calculations.

  • Art exhibits
    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. A unique art experience featuring a wild new form of non-linear storytelling, which includes exploration, discovery and 21st century interactivity. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

    New Mexico History Museum and Santa Fe Opera to recognize “Atomic Histories” in 2018 and 2019. The History Museum’s exhibition opens June 3 and will run through May 2019. The History Museum is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe. Call 476-5200 for information. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October and closed Mondays November through April.

    Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival. The exhibition runs through Jan. 7, 2018. Winter hours (through April 30) are Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Summer hours (starting May 1) are Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Cooking
    Gluten-Free Holiday baking class from 1:30-5:30 p.m. Friday at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road in Los Alamos. Cost is $10. Contact the LA Cooperative Extension Service, 662-2656.
    Dance

  • Local residents Janet Harris and Jennifer Jordan tied for first place in the Los Alamos Small Business Saturday GooseChase Scavenger Hunt, and were each awarded $200 in Chamber Checks.

    This year, Los Alamos Small Business Saturday shoppers had the chance to join in some scavenger hunt fun through a smart phone app called GooseChase. 

    “GooseChase scavenger hunts combine the fun of a traditional scavenger hunt with smart phone technology,” said Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation Executive Director Patrick Sullivan. “It’s a great way to give shoppers a fun reason to get around to as many businesses as possible, accumulate points in real-time, and this year’s winners visited some local businesses they didn’t even know existed!”

    The Los Alamos Small Business Saturday Scavenger Hunt opened at 9 a.m. Nov. 25 and closed at 5 p.m. Dec 2. Scavenger hunt participants downloaded the GooseChase app on their smart phones, signed into the “SmallBizSaturday” game, then visited the listed businesses and took pictures of themselves at each location. 

    The photos are submitted through the app awarding points in real-time at each location. Scavenger hunt participants could be in teams or individuals.

  • The New Mexico History Museum and the Santa Fe Opera will each feature presentations exploring New Mexico’s Atomic Histories in 2018 and 2019.

    The History Museum’s Atomic Histories exhibition opens June 3, 2018 and will run through May 2019.

    The exhibition will highlight American artist Meridel Rubenstein’s artwork including two photo/video/glass/steel installations from the traveling exhibition Critical Mass (1993-97) and Oppenheimer’s Chair (1995) commissioned by the first SITE Santa Fe Biennial to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first atomic test.

    “To enhance understanding of the legacy of the Manhattan Project, the New Mexico History Museum is developing an interpretive exploration of our state’s atomic history,” said Andrew Wulf, executive director of the New Mexico History Museum.   

    “Through our extensive collaboration with the Los Alamos History Museum, the Atomic Heritage Foundation, the Santa Fe Opera, Los Alamos’ Bradbury Science Museum and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History,  the New Mexico History Museum will exhibit a wide variety of resources to tell our state’s nuclear story,” said Melanie LaBorwit, Museum Educator.

  • Los Alamos High School dance students invite the public to a special Winter Dance Show Dec. 18.

    The show performance will showcase dance talents of many students who actively participate in the LAHS Dance Club.

    They will create their own dance pieces in a variety of dance styles, such as Hip Hop, ballroom, Latin, swing and Bollywood.
    Students from the local dance studios are also frequent guest-performers in the show, as well as LAHS dance program alumni.

    The free show starts promptly at 7 p.m. and is expected to end at 8:15 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

    The Smith Auditorium is still undergoing construction, so the performance will be held in the auxiliary gym.

  • TODAY
    Luminaria Walk and Buffet at Sombrillo Nursing Facility and Aspen Ridge Lodge, 1010 Sombrillo Court, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Community is invited. No RSVP required. Dinner and Dessert at our facilities. Contact Cynthia Goldblatt, liaison, at 695-8981.
    THURSDAY
    Poet Jon Davis will speak at 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in the upstairs rotunda, 2400 Central Ave., Los Alamos. Davis is the author of six chapbooks and four books of poetry. He has received numerous awards for his poetry, including a Lannan Literary Award, two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, and the Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets. He occasionally performs as the peripatetic poet Chuck Calabreze.
    FRIDAY
    December 15 —
Gentle Walk
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Chartwell’s Food Services has rolled into the holiday season with a little help from their friends and family members, as they kicked off their Thanksgiving service with about 400 pounds of turkey, 210 pumpkin pies, an obscene amount of mashed potatoes, gravy and green beans.

    “Service of all the schools during our Thanksgiving Extravaganza was nuts,” said Chef Mia Holsapple. “It was much better than last year when we tried to serve all the schools on the same day, but this year we spread it out over a one-week period.”

    Chamisa Elementary kicked off the first holiday meal with 240 served, followed by Aspen Elementary, which served 720, thanks to a generous donation of meals for the entire student body by Del Norte Credit Union. The middle and high school added the Thanksgiving offering in addition to their regular menu, but estimate about 300 turkey meals between the two schools. Pinon Elementary was on Thursday, with 320 meals and Barranca Mesa and Mountain elementary schools brought up the end of the week with Barranca having 400 meals and Mountain 515.