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Today's Features

  • Students and parents are invited to attend AP Night at Los Alamos High School from 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday in the IMC (school library).

    Attendees will be able to meet with teachers and students to learn more about specific AP and Honors course offerings at LAHS, as well as the dual credit programs offered at the high school. 

    Representatives from the University of New Mexico-LA, Northern New Mexico College and Santa Fe Community College will also be available to discuss dual credit and other college level courses.

    AP Night attendees are asked to park in the Sullivan field lot since Future Topper Night is also being held the same evening.

    All LAHS students must take an AP class, an Honors class, an online class, or a dual-credit class to fulfill a graduation requirement.  LAHS currently offers seven Honors courses, 25 AP courses, and several dual-credit classes.

    Advanced Placement Program (AP) courses are college-level courses offered in high school.  At the end of the course, students are required to take the AP exam. 

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre announces auditions for “The Dining Room” by A.R. Gurney, the final production of LALT’s 2017-18 season.

    Auditions will take place 2–5 p.m. Feb. 4, and 6:30–9:30 p.m. Feb. 5, at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.

    Auditioners are asked to prepare a short 1-2 minute monologue of their choice and will be asked to read scenes from the play. Copies of the script are available for check out at Mesa Public Library.

    The script calls for six adults (three women and three men) who each portray approximately nine varied characters. The production dates are May 11-12, 18-20 and March 25-26. The show is directed by Cindy Hines.

    The play is set in the dining room of a typical well-to-do household, the place where the family assembled daily for breakfast and dinner and for any and all special occasions. 

    The action is comprised of a mosaic of interrelated scenes – some funny, some touching, some rueful – which, taken together, create an in-depth portrait of a vanishing species: The upper-middle-class WASP.

    The actors change roles, personalities and ages with virtuoso skill as they portray a wide variety of characters, from little boys to stern grandfathers, and from giggling teenage girls to Irish housemaids.

  • The New Mexico Association of Counties (NMAC) and State Auditor Wayne Johnson have selected Los Alamos County as the recipient of one of its annual Audit Accountability Awards.

    Helen Perraglio, the County’s Chief Financial Officer, was there to accept the award at NMAC’s Legislative Conference last week.

    The awards are given in recognition to large, mid-size and small counties that have done outstanding work on their audits, submitted their audits in a timely manner, and have sustained excellence with the highest audit opinions. In addition, an award is given to the most improved county.

    Los Alamos County received unmodified opinions with no findings in 2016.

    An unmodified opinion is the best opinion that can be given, and means that the financial statements are presented fairly in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. 

    This is the third time Los Alamos County has won the Audit Accountability Award since the inception of the awards in 2011.

    Doña Ana, Curry, Chaves, Guadalupe, Quay and Roosevelt counties also received the award.  

  • The internationally attended Albuquerque FIRST Technical Challenge Qualifying Tournament was held for the first time at the Next Gen Academy in Albuquerque.

    The Alpha Hawks, a team comprised of mostly eighth-graders, and the Beta Hawks, a team comprised of seventh-graders, competed in a field of 16 robotics teams with older high school teams, teams from Mexico, and Colorado. 

    After five seeding matches, where robots are paired together in randomly organized alliance pairs that compete against other robot alliances in this year’ challenge known as FIRST Relic Recovery, the Alphas were second ranked team and the Betas were seeded fifth.

    The top four teams automatically advanced to the semifinals but were required to choose one other team to complete their final alliance.

    The top team, Data Force from Highlands Ranch Colorado, impressed the participants and audience with its ability to complete all the games challenges and honored the Alpha Hawks by inviting them to join their alliance in the final matches.  

    However the Alpha Hawks regretfully declined the invitation in order to be in a position to invite and compete with their sister team, the Beta Hawks. 

  • The Los Alamos County Library children’s librarians and the Los Alamos JJAB invite children and their parents or caregivers to a community playdate being held at the Mesa Public Library, Youth Services Zone from 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 3. 

    This free, drop-in event is being hosted to launch the Los Alamos County Library’s new board book collection and to continue to introduce the Los Alamos Affiliate of Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library.

    In addition to providing families opportunities to peruse the board book collection and sign up for the Imagination Library, there will be additional play activities for children. Snacks will be provided. 

    Angie Manfredi, children’s librarian, has a collection of 80 board books that are now available for circulation. These books will be on display and available for check-out on Feb. 3.

    Many of these books are available only as board books, so this collection brings a new dimension to the library’s early childhood book collection.

    This is the first time the library has created and curated a specific collection made entirely of board books.

    The board books are geared towards children from birth to three years, but they can be enjoyed by others outside this age group.

  • TODAY
    Los Alamos Historical Society presents the continuation of the Atomic Film Festival with the showing of the 1952 film “The Atomic City,” starring Gene Barry, at 7 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. The movie follows a scientist as he struggles to recover his kidnapped son from enemy agents.

    A free performance of “Broken Off,” a new, 10-minute play by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, performed by Claire Singleton and Richard Cooper, will be at 12:30 p.m. at the White Rock Senior Center, 133 Longview Drive. An audience talkback discussion will follow the performance.
    THURSDAY
    A free performance of “Broken Off,” a new, 10-minute play by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, performed by Claire Singleton and Richard Cooper, will be at 12:30 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, 1101 Bathtub Row in Los Alamos. An audience talkback discussion will follow the performance.

    Backcountry Film Festival
at 7 p.m. at the Reel Deal Theater. This is an evening of inspiring and entertaining short films along with prizes and fun. Cost is $12 in advance, $15 on the day of the show. Buy your tickets at the Reel Deal Theater. More information at peecnature.org.

  • The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice Program is having their annual “Daffodils for Hospice” sale.

    Proceeds from the sale support the Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice program for terminally ill individuals.

    Daffodil pre-orders are being taken now through March 2.

    For a glass vase with three bunches (30 stems) of daffodils for $20, a glass vase with two bunch for $15 or a single bunch (10 stems) for $5.  

    The service is unable to offer delivery this year. Delivery will be offered in 2019.

    Customers can pick up their orders at “Daffodil Central.” Call LAVNS for the location in Central Park Square, March 8 or 9 from 8-5:30 p.m.

    Watch for location sales at LANB and Smith’s grocery stores March 8 and March 9.

    To place an order, call Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service at 662-2525 or order online at lavns.com.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools is launching the LAPS Volunteer Program with the help of Volunteer Coordinator Samantha Lippard.

    The goal of the program to connect people in the community with opportunities in the schools where they can share their expertise, lend a helping hand in the classroom or mentor students. Those interested in the program can contact Lippard to find an volunteer opportunity and she will coordinate with teachers and staff to find the best placement for the benefit of students.

    The three main categories of volunteering are tutoring and mentoring, short-term assistance and long-term help. Tutoring and mentoring will focus on semi-frequent visits to school sites where the volunteer is paired with a student who has been identified by a teacher and guidance counselor as needing some extra help socially or academically.

  • Justin Stevenson will discuss the life history, behavior, and biology of bats at 7 p.m. Feb. 6.

    Thanks to support from the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club, several native species will be on hand to provide a unique opportunity to see these beautiful and amazing mammals up-close and in person.

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club invite you to celebrate North American bats and the important role they play in our ecosystems.

    Attendees will also learn about conservation risks including those effected by the highly contagious and deadly white-nose syndrome. He formerly co-chaired of the New Mexico Bat Working Group, currently serves as vice president of the Western Bat Working Group.

    He is also cofounder of R.D. Wildlife Management and Fightwns, a non-profit initiative focusing on raising critical research funds for white-nose syndrome.

    This event is free thanks to support from the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club. There are bat-themed door prizes.

  • The Valles Caldera National Preserve has opened the application period for its 2018 livestock grazing program. 

    The National Park Service is accepting permit applications to graze livestock on the preserve for a four-month grazing season, which runs from June 1 through Sept. 30.

    All livestock operators are encouraged to apply. Applications will be reviewed for compliance with NPS requirements, and a selection will be made by random drawing from the group of qualifying applications.

    The NPS will authorize between 93 and 352 livestock Animal Units per Month (AUM), depending on range conditions during the spring, within a grazing area totaling approximately 1,350 acres.

    The 2018 livestock program may be delayed or canceled if the preserve experiences significant drought conditions.

    Applications and associated documents can be found on the preserve’s website (nps.gov/vall). They can also be obtained by sending an email to vall_info@nps.gov, in person at the Valle Grande Entrance Station during normal business hours, or by calling the NPS permit coordinator at 575-829-4100, ext. 4.