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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos County Library children’s librarians and the Los Alamos JJAB invite children and their parents or caregivers to a community playdate being held at the Mesa Public Library, Youth Services Zone from 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 3. 

    This free, drop-in event is being hosted to launch the Los Alamos County Library’s new board book collection and to continue to introduce the Los Alamos Affiliate of Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library.

    In addition to providing families opportunities to peruse the board book collection and sign up for the Imagination Library, there will be additional play activities for children. Snacks will be provided. 

    Angie Manfredi, children’s librarian, has a collection of 80 board books that are now available for circulation. These books will be on display and available for check-out on Feb. 3.

    Many of these books are available only as board books, so this collection brings a new dimension to the library’s early childhood book collection.

    This is the first time the library has created and curated a specific collection made entirely of board books.

    The board books are geared towards children from birth to three years, but they can be enjoyed by others outside this age group.

  • TODAY
    Los Alamos Historical Society presents the continuation of the Atomic Film Festival with the showing of the 1952 film “The Atomic City,” starring Gene Barry, at 7 p.m. at Fuller Lodge. The movie follows a scientist as he struggles to recover his kidnapped son from enemy agents.

    A free performance of “Broken Off,” a new, 10-minute play by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, performed by Claire Singleton and Richard Cooper, will be at 12:30 p.m. at the White Rock Senior Center, 133 Longview Drive. An audience talkback discussion will follow the performance.
    THURSDAY
    A free performance of “Broken Off,” a new, 10-minute play by local playwright, Robert F. Benjamin, performed by Claire Singleton and Richard Cooper, will be at 12:30 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, 1101 Bathtub Row in Los Alamos. An audience talkback discussion will follow the performance.

    Backcountry Film Festival
at 7 p.m. at the Reel Deal Theater. This is an evening of inspiring and entertaining short films along with prizes and fun. Cost is $12 in advance, $15 on the day of the show. Buy your tickets at the Reel Deal Theater. More information at peecnature.org.

  • The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice Program is having their annual “Daffodils for Hospice” sale.

    Proceeds from the sale support the Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice program for terminally ill individuals.

    Daffodil pre-orders are being taken now through March 2.

    For a glass vase with three bunches (30 stems) of daffodils for $20, a glass vase with two bunch for $15 or a single bunch (10 stems) for $5.  

    The service is unable to offer delivery this year. Delivery will be offered in 2019.

    Customers can pick up their orders at “Daffodil Central.” Call LAVNS for the location in Central Park Square, March 8 or 9 from 8-5:30 p.m.

    Watch for location sales at LANB and Smith’s grocery stores March 8 and March 9.

    To place an order, call Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service at 662-2525 or order online at lavns.com.

  • Los Alamos Public Schools is launching the LAPS Volunteer Program with the help of Volunteer Coordinator Samantha Lippard.

    The goal of the program to connect people in the community with opportunities in the schools where they can share their expertise, lend a helping hand in the classroom or mentor students. Those interested in the program can contact Lippard to find an volunteer opportunity and she will coordinate with teachers and staff to find the best placement for the benefit of students.

    The three main categories of volunteering are tutoring and mentoring, short-term assistance and long-term help. Tutoring and mentoring will focus on semi-frequent visits to school sites where the volunteer is paired with a student who has been identified by a teacher and guidance counselor as needing some extra help socially or academically.

  • Justin Stevenson will discuss the life history, behavior, and biology of bats at 7 p.m. Feb. 6.

    Thanks to support from the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club, several native species will be on hand to provide a unique opportunity to see these beautiful and amazing mammals up-close and in person.

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club invite you to celebrate North American bats and the important role they play in our ecosystems.

    Attendees will also learn about conservation risks including those effected by the highly contagious and deadly white-nose syndrome. He formerly co-chaired of the New Mexico Bat Working Group, currently serves as vice president of the Western Bat Working Group.

    He is also cofounder of R.D. Wildlife Management and Fightwns, a non-profit initiative focusing on raising critical research funds for white-nose syndrome.

    This event is free thanks to support from the Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club. There are bat-themed door prizes.

  • The Valles Caldera National Preserve has opened the application period for its 2018 livestock grazing program. 

    The National Park Service is accepting permit applications to graze livestock on the preserve for a four-month grazing season, which runs from June 1 through Sept. 30.

    All livestock operators are encouraged to apply. Applications will be reviewed for compliance with NPS requirements, and a selection will be made by random drawing from the group of qualifying applications.

    The NPS will authorize between 93 and 352 livestock Animal Units per Month (AUM), depending on range conditions during the spring, within a grazing area totaling approximately 1,350 acres.

    The 2018 livestock program may be delayed or canceled if the preserve experiences significant drought conditions.

    Applications and associated documents can be found on the preserve’s website (nps.gov/vall). They can also be obtained by sending an email to vall_info@nps.gov, in person at the Valle Grande Entrance Station during normal business hours, or by calling the NPS permit coordinator at 575-829-4100, ext. 4.

  • I believe that any time of year is an opportunity to make a resolution to be better, do better or try harder. I use to teach a class for youth that reminded them that they get a clean slate, every 24 hours.

    This year I have taken on some challenges that are designed a little different compared to other years. The idea is to do a new resolution each month, perhaps making an impact on 12 areas of my life.

    We don’t discuss resolutions as a family really, but perhaps I will gather their thoughts. One of the ones I only slightly forced on them was a gratitude jar. Once a month, everyone writes one slip about something they are grateful for, folds it and puts it in the jar.

    So, on New Year’s Eve or day, we will read through all of the things we are grateful for and for our family, ideally there will be 60 slips of gratitude. I have so many thoughts on this project, but not enough space to write. Ask me how things are going later this year and no, not everybody was as keen on the idea as mom.

    January is to eat less and move more with a cheat day on Sunday. I am happy to be down eight pounds. OK, that and some Jazzercise with friends. It is easy to make good choices and have something to blame it on, too. I hope to continue with this one.

  • Azrah, a 7-year-old calico short hair cat, got the raw end of dispute between a landlord and a tenant, and wound up at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter on Jan. 6.

    She’s putting on a brave face though, still hoping that special someone is going to come in any day and take her to her forever home.

    Azrah has been around and knows what she’s about. Primarily, Azrah likes to snack on canned food and prefers to be indoors napping in a sunny spot or sitting on a warm lap being petted.

    Azrah has had all her shots and is house trained. She’s fond of just about anything and anyone that likes her too, but she is especially fond of kittens and kids.

    Since Azrah is an older kitty, the shelter has lowered her adoption fee to just $35.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.
    Photo By Paulina Gwaltney Photography, 910-333-6362, Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • UNM-Los Alamos Community Education classes started this month, targeting a range of interests.

    From Health and Wellness to Language, from Home, Garden and Fine Arts to Professional and Personal Development, there are many classes to feed the spirit of lifelong learners. UNM-LA Community Education program coordinator Mike Katko invites the public to, “Come join us!”

    New and short-term classes begin each month, and the Community Education department is always interested in adding new subjects. Registration continues throughout the spring.

    Some of the new non-credit Community Education classes offered this spring include:
    How to Publish Your Book, a nuts and bolts course taught by Carol MacLeod, a published author with years of experience.

    Chinese Ink Painting-Poetry and Music, taught by Kahlil Tung, a professional artist from China, who instructs in the ancient art of ink painting thousands of years old. 

    Personal Self-Defense, a non-sparring course taught by Miles Ledoux, a self-defense expert who has owned his own studio in the Los Angeles, California area.

  • An updated fractal show will play in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium at 7 p.m.  Jan. 26 and the full-dome “Sea Monsters” film is screening at 2 p.m.
    The fractal show incorporates math, science, art and nature in a full-dome planetarium show featuring original music. “Sea Monsters” is a film that uncovers a time when prehistoric sea creatures come to life.
    For more information, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. To reserve tickets, call 662-0460.