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Today's Features

  • The public is invited to a State of Education speech at Los Alamos Public Schools Monday.

    The presentation is hosted by the District Parent Council and will be from 5:30-7 p.m.

    The LAPS School Board and Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus will speak at the Los Alamos High School Speech Theater.

    This event is open to all parents, staff, students and interested community members. The evening will include special presentations by the High School Bel Canto Choir, a slide show of student artwork and a video of LAPS students.

    Light snacks prepared by parents and LAHS students will be available, along with water and tea.

  • By RYAN NAKASHIMA and MAE ANDERSON, AP Technology Writers

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Google put the spotlight on its artificial intelligence smarts at its annual developers conference Tuesday, announcing new consumer features imbued with machine learning.

    Many of the updates have a practical bent, designed to ease tasks such as composing emails, making lists, navigating city streets and lessening the digital distractions that have increasingly addled people's lives as a result of previous tech industry innovations.

    One of the biggest crowd-pleasers for the thousands of software developers who gathered at the outdoor conference was an augmented reality feature on Google Maps that helps people get walking directions. Users will be able to follow arrows — or possibly a cartoon-like creature — that appear on a camera view showing the actual street in front of them.

    Some new features for Android phones also aim to improve people's digital well-being, including a new "shush" mode that automatically turns on the "Do Not Disturb" function if someone flips their phone face down on a table. And "Wind Down Mode" will fade the screen to greyscale at a designated bedtime to help users disconnect before bed.

  • If you meet Sid, a Bombay-American Shorthair cat at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter, you have to keep a secret from him. He thinks he’s a black panther.

    But in reality, Sid is like most cats at the animal shelter – very friendly and in desperate need of a forever home.
    He’s a bit of a big boy, too, for a 9-month old.

    Another thing people should know about him is that he’s never really had a forever home. Los Alamos County Shelter volunteers received him from the Animal Welfare Coalition of Northeastern New Mexico. Sid had been at the coalition shelter from the age of 7 weeks old.

    It’s a bit of a mystery too, since volunteers say he’s very friendly toward humans (including children), other cats and dogs.

    Sid likes to sleep in small spaces. Sid has been micro chipped, and has been vaccinated and is disease free.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • The Los Alamos League of Women Voters invites the public to the final candidate forum to introduce candidates who have opposition in the June 5 primary election.

    The forum is scheduled for 7 p.m. May 9 at Fuller Lodge.

    Come to the forum on Wednesday, May 9, at Fuller Lodge. Refreshments and conversation with the candidates will begin at 6:30 p.m.

    Candidates expected to attend this forum will be:

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 2: Gregory S. Shaffer, Donna M. Bevacqua-Young, Maria E. Sanchez-Gagne, and Jerry A. Archuleta (all Democrats);

    • First Judicial District Court Judge, Division 5:  Jason Lidyard and Matthew Jackson (both Democrats)

    • New Mexico House of Representatives, District 43: Pete Sheehey and Christine Chandler (both Democrats).
    All of the judicial candidates listed above are Democrats; there is no Republican opposition.  Hence, the winner in each division will become the only candidate for the November election.

    The Democrat who wins the primary election for House District 43 will face the Republican candidate Lisa Shin in November.

    Before the November 6 general election, the League will hold a round of forums for all of the candidates on the November ballot.  

  • Former long-time Los Alamos resident Jessica Kisiel will give a free presentation at 7 p.m. May 17 at Mesa Public Library.

    Her talk: “Healing Chronic Pain Through Alignment,” documents her journey from elite athletics to being a chronic pain patient and back to competitive sports.

    Kisiel’s story, and those of several clients she helped return to an active lifestyle, is documented in her recently published book, “Winning the Injury Game” (https://thepfathlete.com/book/).

    She is excited to share her insights about healing and message of hope for rising above chronic pain with the community that supported her during her recovery.

    Kisiel overcame severe hip osteoarthritis, three knee surgeries and debilitating back and neck pain through the alignment and training strategies she describes in her new book.

    The book is written for the active person living with chronic pain that wants to keep moving and playing sports. It is for someone who has tried the standard approaches to healing but still hurts and is open to an alternative approach.

    The book is organized into three sections. Section 1 addresses the mental and emotional side of injuries, section 2 describes the link between physical alignment and pain, and section 3 explores an approach to training that respects the body.

  • Cold War Patriots (CWP), a community resource organization that is the nation’s strongest and most sustained voice advocating for worker benefits, will host free town hall meetings for nuclear weapons and uranium workers in New Mexico Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 2 p.m. each day.

    With a new format this year, CWP is making it easier for workers to get the specific information they need about the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.

    The morning sessions, starting at 10 a.m. will be customized for people who have already applied for EEOICPA benefits and have either been awarded a U.S. Department of Labor white medical benefits card or have a pending claim.

    The 2 p.m. afternoon sessions are for workers who haven’t yet applied for their benefits or those who have applied but whose claims have been denied. There is no new information for post 1971 uranium miners at this time. The afternoon session participants will learn:

    • If they qualify for up to $400,000 in monetary compensation and free healthcare

    • How to apply for benefits

    • What benefits are included

    • How to reopen denied claims

  • The “Voices of the Manhattan Project” oral history website, a joint project of the Atomic Heritage Foundation and the Los Alamos Historical Society, now features 500 video and audio interviews with Manhattan Project veterans, family members, and experts.

    “The website contains 500 first-hand accounts, providing a kaleidoscope of perspectives on the Manhattan Project. Readily accessible online, the collection is a treasure trove for journalists, scholars, documentary producers, museums, educators, students and audiences worldwide,” said Cynthia C. Kelly, president of AHF.

    Launched in 2012, the “Voices of the Manhattan Project” website now reaches more than 10,000 people per month.

    Both organizations are continuing to record interviews around the country. AHF and LAHS hope to publish an additional 500 interviews on the website by 2020, and to expand the scope of the site to include interviews with Cold War nuclear workers, Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and nuclear experts today.

  • Members and friends of the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will host a church service dedicated to the work of the trip to Mexico Sunday.

    The spring break travelers will share their experiences of what took place on the life changing venture. The team of 75 built 3 homes for 3 families in four days. The Puerto Penasco venture is a year in the making, with a long history of service.

    One local first timer on the trip, was LAHS junior Jack Whitacre. Whitacre was invited by a friend who had been on a previous trip.

    The United Church of Los Alamos is located at 2525 Canyon Road. The Sunday service will begin at 9:30 and last for one hour. Additional information is available at 662-2971.
     

  • Art exhibits
    National Museum of Nuclear Science & History has opened a permanent exhibit by American sculptor Jim Sanborn called “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” which recreates the Manhattan Project experiments that determined when plutonium goes “critical in an atomic bomb.”
    The museum is open seven days a week from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and is located at 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, in Albuquerque. Call 505-245-2137 for information, or visit nuclearmuseum.org.

    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

    Spirit Lines Exhibit at Fuller Lodge Art Center. Find beauty in the broken and imperfect in the tradition of Wabi Sabi. Over 40 artists from around the country have submitted their works in the Spirit Lines theme. Works will be on display until May 5. Art gallery open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays.

  • The Whiskey Classic, an immersive event experience designed for whiskey, bourbon and scotch aficionados, industry professionals, as well as those who want to discover the art behind these beverages, will be Oct. 13 at the Bonanza Creek Movie Ranch in Santa Fe.

    The venue is one of the most famous western movie sets in the film industry. Bonanza Creek Ranch offers a 24-building western movie town, which was first used for “The Man from Laramie” movie set in 1955.

    Later, the ranch was used for such blockbuster hits as “Lonesome Dove” and “Lightning Jack.”
    Most recently, the movies “Cowboys and Aliens,” “Appaloosa,” and “3:10 to Yuma,” among many others have filmed there.

    “Utilizing this iconic movie backdrop nods to the history of New Mexico, the state’s incredible film industry partners and celebrates the tradition of whiskey making,” said Micaela Brown, Producer of The Whiskey Classic.

    “We have some availability for brands to participate as a vendor or sponsor in either our tasting tent or western movie structures. This is the most uniquely immersive event experience New Mexico has to offer, and we anticipate a sell-out crowd!”

    Early bird tickets can be bought right on the event website.