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Today's Features

  • Noah Sandoval, the son of Peter and Cindy Sandoval, has been chosen as the Rotary Student of the Month for April. Sandoval is involved in many school and community organizations. At the high school, Sandoval is the senior class president of student council, which he has been involved in for three years. Similarly, he serves as the National Honor Societys vice president, and has been a member for the past two years.

  • Look up in the sky! Its a bird! Its a plane! No, its one of more than 20 rockets launched by members of the Pion Rocket Club during an early morning assembly at the school. Students at the school participated in the countdown for each launch, which featured rockets with names such as Big Bertha, Big Daddy and Screaming Eagle.

    There was also a three-stage rocket, a rocket that measured more than 5 feet and one less than 5 inches tall.

  • The Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos is offering the chance to sleep late, forget about washing dishes and still get breakfast for your entire family.

    The Kiwanis Club will hold a pancake breakfast from 7 - 11 a.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

  • Kokopelli, a fertility and agriculture deity who chases away winter and ushers in spring with his flute playing, traveled to Barranca Mesa Elementary School this week.

    The fourth-grade class worked since January to prepare for his arrival. In fact, the whole staff, from physical education instructors to social studies teachers, got in on the action. They helped students not only study this Southwestern Native American god, but write and illustrate books about the deity, create puppets for a puppet show, rehearse a song about Kokopelli, and learn a Kokopelli dance.

  • Los Alamos High School Olions Thespian Club is not ending its theater season on a sweet note. No, a much more evil, sinister song will be sung. Something villainous appears to be growing within Duane Smith Auditorium. It’s in the form of a monstrous, man-eating Venus-fly-trap in the musical, “Little Shop of Horrors.”

    “This is a show I always I wanted to do,” Nina Saunders, sponsor of the Olions, said. “From the first time I saw ee I was just intrigued about the idea of a musical being a horror story.”

  • Twenty years ago, there was no year-round community pool in Los Alamos. The community shared a small pool with Los Alamos High School, but the public’s use was restricted because of the high school swimmers’ busy schedules.

    A group of citizens decided to change the situation. So, in 1984, a group of Los Alamos residents talked to the county recreation board about building a community pool, said Frederica Smith, aquatic center sub-committee and parks and recreation board member.

  • The Unitarian Church of Los Alamos will formally install its seventh minister, the Rev. John A. Cullinan, in a ceremony at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the church.

    The installation ceremony is a formal recognition of the covenant between the minister and the congregation. The Rev. Jennifer Innis has been invited to preach the sermon, titled “Sunday Promises.” She serves as minister of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Midland, Texas and the consulting minister for the Red River Unitarian Universalist Church in Denison, Texas.

  • Local Orthodox Christians are joining all Orthodox Christians across the world in the celebration of Holy Week and Pascha (Easter). This preparation began last weekend with the end of Great Lent Saturday, and the Saturday of the Raising of Lazarus from the grave. For Orthodox Christians, this year Pascha (as Easter is called) falls several weeks later then the Western Protestant and Roman Catholic observance.

  • The 41st Annual Spring Arts and Crafts Fair will be a homecoming for John Trujillo. The jewelry-maker grew up in Los Alamos and graduated from Los Alamos High Sschool in 1966. The community holds another significance other than childhood memories. It inspired him to do jewelry.

    Trujillo said his high school art teacher taught him to make jewelry, although it didn’t impact him until later.

  • Mozart started composing music when he was 5 years old. At 7, Thomas Chadwick of Los Alamos isn’t too far behind the famous composer.

    Chadwick is one of 16 finalists in the Hey Mozart!, a statewide program that encourages children who are 12 and younger to create an original melody. The program is now in its third year.