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Report: NSA spying on virtual worlds, online games

LONDON (AP) — American and British intelligence operations have been spying on gamers across the world, media outlets reported, saying that the world's most powerful espionage agencies sent undercover agents into virtual universes to monitor activity in online fantasy games such as "World of Warcraft."

Stories carried Monday by The New York Times, the Guardian, and ProPublica said U.S. and U.K. spies have spent years trawling online games for terrorists or informants. The stories, based on documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, offer an unusual take on America's world-spanning surveillance campaign, suggesting that even the fantasy worlds popular with children, teens, and escapists of all ages aren't beyond the attention of the NSA and its British counterpart, GCHQ.

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Spy program gathered Americans' Internet records

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration gathered U.S. citizens' Internet data until 2011, continuing a spying program started under President George W. Bush that revealed whom Americans exchanged emails with and the Internet Protocol address of their computer, documents disclosed Thursday show.

The National Security Agency ended the program that collected email logs and timing, but not content, in 2011 because it decided it didn't effectively stop terrorist plots, according to the NSA's director, Gen. Keith Alexander, who also heads the U.S. Cyber Command. He said all data was purged in 2011.

Britain's Guardian newspaper on Thursday released documents detailing the collection, though the program was also described earlier this month by The Washington Post.

The latest revelation follows previous leaks from ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden, who is presumed hiding at a Moscow airport transit area, waiting to hear whether Ecuador, Iceland or another country might grant him asylum. He fled Hong Kong over the weekend and flew to Russia after being charged with violating American espionage laws.

The Man Who Sold America's First-Strike Codes

In 1985, Jonathan Pollard was an American civilian analyst working for U.S. Naval Intelligence, but he was also spying for three foreign countries.

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Manhattan Project agent Safferstein dies at 92

NEW YORK (AP) — Nathan Safferstein was barely 21 when circumstances suddenly propelled him from his job as a supermarket manager into the stealth world of a counterintelligence agent on the project that produced the atomic bomb.

A customer at the Connecticut market had told her brother — an Army intelligence commander — about a bright young prospect. Soon, paperwork was filled out, recommendations made.

Wartime security being paramount, Safferstein eavesdropped on phone calls of scientists and engineers in Los Alamos, N.M., to make sure no Manhattan Project secrets were leaked, and delivered bomb-making uranium and top-secret messages. He also scrawled his signature on the first A-bomb, called "Little Boy," dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. A second bomb leveled Nagasaki on Aug. 9, and Japan surrendered six days later.

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Spy on the Wall: Video Conferencing at Risk

Video conferencing has quickly evolved into a technology that's everywhere, from Facebook feeds to corporate boardrooms. Its value as a communications tool is profound. But so too is its vulnerability to hackers.

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Jude rules Leonardo Mascheroni poses no threat to community or national security

Local espionage suspect released to halfway house

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A physicist accused after an FBI sting operation of trying to help Venezuela develop a nuclear weapon has been released to a halfway house.

Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni appeared Monday in Albuquerque before a federal magistrate.

A defense attorney argued Mascheroni has posed no threat to national security or a danger to the community in the 11 months since a search warrant was served at his Los Alamos home.

The judge also agreed to place Mascheroni's wife, Marjorie, on house arrest.

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Lab scientist, wife indicted for leaking nuke weapons info

By Garrison Wells

  A former Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist and his wife were indicted Friday on charges of providing classified nuclear weapons information to a Venezuelan government official.
The pair, Pedro    Mascheroni, 75, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Argentina, and Marjorie Roxby Mascheroni, 67, a U.S. citizen was also charged with conspiring to participate in the development of an atomic weapon for Venezuela.
The 22-count indictment was returned by a federal grand jury in the District of New Mexico.

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See original story of FBI raid that broke in the Monitor last October

Former Los Alamos scientist and wife indicted for allegedly providing nuke info to Venezuelan government

By Garrison Wells

 

A former Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist and his wife were indicted Friday on charges of providing classified nuclear weapons information to a Venezuelan government official.

The pair, Pedro    Mascheroni, 75, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Argentina, and Marjorie Roxby Mascheroni, 67, a U.S. citizen was also charged with conspiring to participate in the development of an atomic weapon for Venezuela.

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LANL cooperated with feds on the investigation

Former Los Alamos scientist and wife indicted for allegedly providing nuke info to Venezuelan government

By Garrison Wells

A former Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist and his wife were indicted Friday on charges of providing classified nuclear weapons information to a Venezuelan government official.

The pair, Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni, 75, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Argentina, and Marjorie Roxby Mascheroni, 67, a U.S. citizen was also charged with conspiring to participate in the development of an atomic weapon for Venezuela.

The 22-count indictment was returned by a federal grand jury in the District of New Mexico. 

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