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Today's Sports

  • A team on a mission

     When the Los Alamos High School boy’s soccer team is on the field together, it appears that they have been playing alongside each other their whole lives.

    That’s because, in many cases, they have been.

    They may not be the biggest or the fastest team. But every player knows his role, and can anticipate where their teammates are going to be at any given time, because the majority of them have been playing together since they were 6 years old.

    Tristan Semelsberger, a senior midfielder and captain said that playing together since elementary school is a factor this is hard to capture on the score sheet.

    “It just gives us a greater team chemistry together,” Semelsberger said. “I think we know each other’s play style very well, which definitely helps us.”

    Ben Rees, a senior defenseman and captain, said that the familiarity also helps when things start to go poorly.

    “A lot of it just has to do with getting along with each other in the sense that when things get tough and people start getting frustrated, that it’s not toxic and aggressive to the team atmosphere,” Rees said.

    What they lack in size and speed, they make up for in precision.

  • Rodeo returns to LA

    The Los Alamos County Open Rodeo will take place this weekend at Brewer Arena, providing fun for participants and spectators Saturday and Sunday.

    The event is open to anyone. People can choose to sign up ahead of time, or at the rodeo grounds this weekend.

    There will be 17 events run both days, ranging from sheep chasing and steer riding for children to bull riding and barrel racing for adults.

    Brendan Tuning, the organizer of Los Alamos County’s Fair and Rodeo, said that the most popular events every year are the sheep chasing and the bull riding.

    “Those definitely seem to have the most broad appeal,” Tuning said. “A lot of people enjoy watching the barrel racing too because of how fast-paced it is.”

    He explained that a lot of people see the other events as filler between the main attractions, but that every event is sure to bring loud cheers from the crowd.

    Between 80 and 100 people are expected to participate, with 20 or 30 of those entering multiple events throughout the weekend.

    Entry fees are different in every event, with certain children’s events being free, and some adult events reaching as high as $75 per person.

    To register, call (719) 580-3022.

  • Ski club to consider ownership...

    Los Alamos Ski Club members will hold a special meeting Thursday to vote on a proposal that would transfer ownership of the Pajarito Ski Area from the Los Alamos Ski Club to the Pajarito Recreation Limited Partnership.

    The proposal states that the partnership would acquire all 750 acres of the Pajarito Ski Area land in Los Alamos County, and assumes all of the ski club’s outstanding debt.

    The move would also stabilize ownership of the Pajarito Ski Area after years of uncertainty. The ownership was expected to transfer to the county.

    The ski club and its approximately 2,000 members have taken out $1.25 million in loans from Los Alamos National Bank since 2014.

    PRLP would also commit to paying for half of the installation of a water-supply pipeline that would supply water to Pajarito Mountain for many uses, including snowmaking, fire prevention and providing potable water to Ski Area base facilities.

    The construction costs of the pipeline are estimated to be $3.4 million. Los Alamos County has already set aside $2 million for its share of the pipeline costs. The county’s utilities department is currently designing the pipeline.

  • Back on the gridiron

    This season, the Los Alamos Hilltopper football team is all about family.

    For them, it signifies more than just the word prominently displayed across the top of their practice gear. It is the key to putting together a successful year.

    “We are a family,” head coach Garett Williams told his team following their practice at Sullivan Field Wednesday morning.

    “This isn’t about me and it isn’t about you. That’s what makes this such a great game, because you can’t do it alone.”

    After a summer’s worth of preparation, the Hilltoppers came together this week for what they hope will be a long and successful season.

    However, the team entered its first week of official practices with many questions that needed to be answered and unity that needed to be built.

    “Right now, our expectations are to come out, work hard, develop a brotherhood and develop some team unity,”

    Williams told the Albuquerque Journal earlier this summer. “The intensity and the effort is the thing we’re focusing on right now. If we put in the work, the rest is going to take care of itself.”

  • Aquatomics place third at state

     The Los Alamos Aquatomics swim team finished third at the state championships last weekend, making it one of their most successful seasons ever.

    One year ago, the team finished eighth at the state championships and was intent on improving in all aspects this year.

    After a summer of strong performances, they did just that.

    Seven different swimmers won individual events, and the team came out on top in three relays.

    The relays ended up being a key factor for the team, because relay performances are worth double the points of individual races at the state championships.

    Assistant coach Linda Corliss, who has been with the team since 2008, said she had never seen a performance like that.

    “I can’t remember us ever doing quite that well,” Corliss said.  “I’m proud of everyone because they all put their heart and soul into this all weekend and came away with some great results.”

    Going into the final day of competition, Corliss said she tallied up what the results would be if everyone swam to their seed times.

    When the races took place, the final scores were more than 10 points higher than what was predicted.

    “That shows that everybody swam better than what was expected and really gave it their all,” Corliss said.

  • Off to the races

    For the 45th straight year, competitors in the Tour De Los Alamos turned the streets of the county into a high-speed cycling course, resulting in an unforgettable event.

    The race, which was described by organizers as the “oldest bicycle race in the Southwest,” attracted more than 100 people to the area.

    Race director Cyndi Wells said that people came from hundreds of miles around to take part, including multiple racers from Texas and Colorado.

    “I’m always super excited to see lots of people coming in from out of town,” Wells said.

    She said that although there are some people who come back year after year for the race, it is the infusion of new racers each year that keeps the race as successful as it has become.

    “We had lots of people say that they would definitely be coming back next year, and that they would be bringing even more of their friends with them,” Wells said.

    Registration has steadily increased in the past few years, and Wells said she expects that to continue into the future.

    “I think after the great race we had this weekend, the word is going to really get out about our race and I’m really looking forward to seeing what the turnout looks like next year,” Wells said.

  • Senior softball falls in...

    Facing some of the toughest teams in the country, the Los Alamos County Little League Senior Softball team advanced to the semifinals of the regional championships this week. The team came just two wins short of a trip to the national championship tournament.

    Los Alamos County earned its berth in the regional tournament in Vidalia, Louisiana, after winning the New Mexico state championship two weeks ago. The team competed against teams from Colorado, Louisiana, Arkansas and two teams from Texas.

    In the first game of the tournament, Los Alamos County showed they were a real threat, defeating the team from Aurora, Colorado 23-0.

    Pitcher Savana Luster proved to be the most valuable player of the game, throwing five scoreless innings, and giving up just three hits. She also struck out nine.

    The offense was clicking on all cylinders, collecting 21 hits throughout the game.

    The team scored 11 runs in the second inning, and another nine in the third inning. Katie Wilmer led Los Alamos County with four RBIs. Jade Tucker and Alicia Gonzales each added three.

    The team did not fare as well in the second game, falling to the host team from Vidalia, Louisiana 13-0.

  • Salmon aims to grow PGA LEAD...

    New Mexico State University’s golf management program is once again among the forerunners of the Professional Golfers Association of America training opportunities.

    Josh Salmon has joined the second 15-member cohort of the national PGA LEAD program.

    Salmon is a program specialist with the NMSU PGA Golf Management Program housed in the College of Business marketing department.

    The PGA of America established PGA LEAD to identify, mentor and progress PGA members from diverse backgrounds along a guided path to leadership roles in the association. The program also aids in developing individuals who desire to serve and make an impact on nonprofit boards within their communities.

    “I was surprised when PGA of America’s president Paul Levy called to tell me the news,” Salmon said. “It was January and I hadn’t heard anything since applying in November.”

  • LA gets set for oldest bike race...

    Tour De Los Alamos will return to the streets of Los Alamos County this Sunday for the 45th consecutive year.

    Labeled by organizers as the “oldest bicycle race in the Southwest,” it has become an annual tradition in the area, one that attracts people from all across the region to the Atomic City.

    “I can’t believe the Tour De Los Alamos has been around as long as it has,” race director Cyndi Wells said.

    The course is a counter-clockwise loop that stretches 27 miles, beginning in downtown Los Alamos and running throughout the entire area.

    “Depending on what category you are in, you may be doing one to three laps,” Wells said.

    Participants in the Senior Men Pro category will be racing for approximately 81 miles on the course that features a variety of uphill and downhill sections. The steepest climb comes near the end of the course, which will be a nearly two-mile uphill climb.

    All other categories of racer will complete either one or two laps of the course, depending on age and skill level.

    The race will begin at Trinity Drive and 20th Street.

    Prizes will be given out to the top finishers in each category. The top prize of the day will be given to the man who completes the three-lap course the quickest. He will earn $300.  

  • Los Alamos aims to become ‘...

    For nearly three years, Los Alamos County’s Public Works Department has been taking steps to make the county a Bicycle Friendly Community. By the end of this year, it may be a reality.

    Each year, the League of American Bicyclists accepts applications from communities around the country and determines whether they qualify as “bicycle friendly.”

    According to its official website, the League “represents bicyclists in the movement to create safer roads, stronger communities and a bicycle-friendly America.”

    Currently, 416 communities around the country are recognized as bike friendly, and more than 100 communities have earned honorable mention status. There are multiple tiers included within the label of bicycle friendly, ranging from bronze status to platinum.

    In New Mexico, Santa Fe is recognized in the silver tier, while Albuquerque and Las Cruces are in the bronze tier.

    In 2016, Los Alamos County submitted an application for consideration, and was given an honorable mention recognition, with guidelines on how they could earn medal status in the future.

    Eric Martinez, the county engineer for Los Alamos County, said that the county looked at all of the recommendations the League of American Bicyclists gave to them, and began working toward accomplishing them.