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National

  • Football: Talks continue as deadline nears

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones was among a half-dozen team representatives who joined NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell at labor negotiations Thursday.
    New York Giants owner John Mara, Kansas City Chiefs owner Clark Hunt, Pittsburgh Steelers owner Art Rooney II, Philadelphia Eagles president Joe Banner and Washington Redskins general manager Bruce Allen also attended the session.
    The twice-extended collective bargaining agreement is due to expire Friday.

  • Football: NFL, union meet again Tuesday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Working to figure out how to divide about $9 billion in annual revenues, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, union executive director DeMaurice Smith and their negotiating teams were at a federal mediator’s office Tuesday for a 13th day of labor talks.
    New York Giants owner John Mara and Washington Redskins general manager Bruce Allen were also in attendance.

  • Men's basketball: Ohio St. back at top

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — After getting through its toughest stretch of the season, Ohio State is back at No. 1.
    For the third week in a row The Associated Press Top 25 poll has had a new team on top. The Buckeyes climbed a spot over Duke, which lost at Virginia Tech on Saturday night.
    The Buckeyes welcome their return.

  • 10 owners attend NFL mediation with union

    WASHINGTON (AP) — All 10 members of the NFL owners' labor committee and New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees attended Wednesday's mediation session between the league and the players' union, with fewer than 40 hours left until the collective bargaining agreement expires.

  • Football: NFLPA still hoping for labor deal as clock ticks down

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NFL teams want to ignore the clock and keep it business at this week’s annual scouting combine.
    With the league’s collective bargaining agreement expiring at the end of Thursday and the looming lockout less than a week away, the hype over this year’s top draft prospects has suddenly been overshadowed by talk about contingency plans, mediation and unification.
    It’s a whole new universe for the NFL, which hasn’t had a work stoppage since 1987.

  • Running: Boston Marathon training hampered by snow, ice

    BOSTON (AP) — Alex McKinney has dodged cars, hurdled snow banks, slipped on ice and splashed through slushy puddles while training for the Boston Marathon.

    Preparing for 26.2 miles is never easy, but this winter has been particularly trying for runners, who have had to deal with record snowfall in the Northeast.

    Before they can even think about challenging Heartbreak Hill, they've had to endure slippery sidewalks, icy inclines and frozen footpaths.

  • Football: Super Bowl is most-watched program ever

    NEW YORK (AP) — For the second year in a row, the Super Bowl has set a record for American television viewing.
    The Nielsen Co. said Monday that an estimated 111 million people watched the Green Bay Packers outlast the Pittsburgh Steelers in professional football’s ultimate game. That tops the 106.5 million who watched the 2010 game between New Orleans and Indianapolis.
    “M-A-S-H” had held the title of the most-watched TV show in the United States for 27 years.

  • Football: Tickets to rally at Lambeau sell out

    GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Giddy fans reveling in the Green Bay Packers’ fourth Super Bowl title bought out all 50,000 seats to Tuesday’s celebration at Lambeau Field in a matter of hours, despite forecasts that call for frigid conditions.
    Tickets to the “Return to Titletown” event went on sale Monday morning for $5 each and were sold out by that evening, team spokesman Aaron Popkey said. Tickets were selling on the online ticket sales site StubHub on Tuesday for as much as $140.

  • Labor woes continue to cast long shadow on Super Bowl

    DALLAS (AP) — Roger Goodell recognized the questioner, even kidded him.
    Chad Ochocinco was in no joking mood.
    The Bengals receiver, reporting for his own OCNN network, stood up at Goodell’s annual Super Bowl news conference Friday and asked the NFL commissioner how close the league and players union were to a new contract that would avoid a potential lockout.

  • Super Bowl hair: He could-grow-all-the-way

    DALLAS — Vince Lombardi surely would’ve loved to have Clay Matthews or Troy Polamalu on those great Packers teams of the 1960s.
    Their hair? Uhhh, that might’ve been a problem.
    At a Super Bowl where there’s been nearly as much focus on shampoos and conditioners as zone blitzes and passing schemes, one of Lombardi’s former players huffed at all the attention going to all that hair, from Polamalu’s out-of-control curls to Matthews’ stringy locks.