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National

  • VIDEO: NCAA Men's Basketball Field Is Set
  • Colts cut Manning after 14 years

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Colts owner Jim Irsay says the team is releasing quarterback Peyton Manning after a 14-year run that included one Super Bowl title and four MVP awards.
    Irsay and Manning are appearing together Wednesday at a news conference at the Colts’ team complex to announce the move.
    The 35-year-old Manning will become a free agent, and there is expected to be interest from a half-dozen or so NFL clubs, provided he’s healthy. Manning is coming off a series of operations to his neck and missed all of last season.

  • VIDEO: Colts, Manning Breaking Up

    The Peyton era in Indianapolis is expected to end Wednesday, according to a report by ESPN. Citing anonymous sources, the sports network says the Colts organization plans to hold a news conference on Wednesday to announce the decision.

  • Kicked wrestler suing promoter

    JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. (AP) — A former professional wrestler is suing his opponent and the Indiana-based promoter who arranged their bout last year, claiming his foe was supposed to lose their match but had other ideas and kicked him so hard in the crotch that he had to have surgery.
    John Levi Miller, 23, contends in his lawsuit filed Monday that Clinton Woosley was the “heel,” a term used to describe the designated villain, of their match last June, The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Ky., reported. He says Woosley, who wrestles under the name Guido Andretti, declined his invitation to map out the fight, as is customary, and instead said he understood the plan.

  • VIDEOS: Amazing Crashes at Daytona 500

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Well, NASCAR certainly knows how to make a prime-time impression.

    Rain, fire and Tide laundry detergent all factored into a Daytona 500 that will go down as the most bizarre in NASCAR history.

    And Brad Keselowski tweeted most of it live. From his race car. Then he provided another update minutes after crashing at 190 mph.

    And oh, yeah, Matt Kenseth picked up his second Daytona 500 title.

    "You would think after 65 years and running all the races that NASCAR has run ... that you've seen about everything," NASCAR President Mike Helton said. "You do think about, 'Oh, my gosh, if that can happen, what else can happen?'"

  • VIDEO: Kenseth Wins Daytona 500 Again

    Matt Kenseth overcame a rain delay of more than 24 hours and a two hour red flag period to win the Daytona 500 for the second time.

  • NASCAR postpones Daytona 500 for first time ever

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The Daytona 500 has been postponed for the first time in its 54-year history.

    NASCAR postponed The Great American Race after heavy rain saturated Daytona International Speedway on Sunday.

    Officials spent more than four hours waiting for a window to dry the famed track, but it never came. And when the latest storm cell passed over the speedway, they had little choice but to call it a day and reschedule.

    The 500-mile race was rescheduled for noon Monday. It will be aired on Fox.

  • Big wreck at end of Daytona race

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Only six of 43 cars made it unscathed to the finish line of the Nationwide Series opener at Daytona International Speedway.

    James Buescher was not driving one of those clean cars.

    Still, he managed to dodge and weave his way through an 11-car accident on the last lap of Saturday's race, stealing the victory and setting the stage for what's expected to be a wild Daytona 500.

    Buescher joined unknown John King, winner of Friday night's Truck Series opener, as surprise winners this weekend at Daytona. Both came from nowhere to win crash-marred races. Elliott Sadler, runner-up to Buescher on Saturday, said Sunday's race will be much of the same.

  • VIDEO: John Wall Amazing Behind Back-Dunk
  • ‘Prince Albert’ will have a fresh start

    TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) — Decked out in Angels’ gear from head to toe, Albert Pujols looked like the same slugger whose swing in St. Louis became as symbolic as the Gateway Arch.
    With a halo-topped “A’’ logo on his cap, Pujols, his massive chest and arms filling out every corner of his red shirt, sat behind a microphone and excitedly announced the start of a new stage of his career.
    “Here I am,” he said.
    And here he goes.