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Opinion

  • Something like a vision has crept from the technocratic veneer of the Martinez administration. This is not the grand morally uplifting poetry preferred here. But it will have to do, given that the administration’s big picture, so far as I have figured it out, has been the major and appropriate crusade with public education and tinkering at the edges of the tax system.
    The environment for the unveiling came courtesy of the Association of Commerce and Industry, which invited Scott Darnell, the governor’s deputy chief of staff, to be the luncheon speaker at ACI’s fall policy summit in Albuquerque. Darnell’s job is policy oversight for a big piece of state government.
    The full disclosure here is that Darnell and I have been close enough neighbors to occupy the same ward table at Republican meetings, back when I attended such things. Then Darnell went to graduate school at Harvard, Martinez became governor and the rest, as they say….

  • BY MARITA NOON
    Executive director for Energy Makes America Great

  • The year was 1972 and America eagerly sat down to watch the beginning of the third season of “All In The Family.”  After two years of spouting bigoted, sexist and racial epithets, he had won the hearts of our nation.
    How could you not love someone so despicable and close-minded? We laughed at his stupidity. We laughed at his inane philosophies.
    We laughed at what he represented – evolution’s greatest accomplishment of a non-thinking life form.
    The human race.
    The season’s opening episode was particularly funny, mostly because it went off the scale of sanity.
    Archie is invited as “a man on the street” to appear on television and present his views on gun control. As usual, he goes off on a ridiculous rant, embarrassing his family by suggesting that skyjackings could be prevented by arming all the passengers. No need to search for firearms ... just hand them out at the gate! If everyone is packing, no one would dare pull out a rod and try anything!
    It was funny, hilarious, to even think that anyone with a brain connected to their mouth would suggest that arming people would eliminate the possibility of a crime.
    Well, we have to apologize to Archie.  His ideas on domestic peace were visionary.

  • My son and I just had The Discussion. Not the one about the birds and the bees, or the car keys (his or mine). No, this is the one where I told him plainly that I did not want to be a lump of meat being kept alive by machines. Pull the plug, I said.
    This was an easier conversation to have because I’m not expecting to check out any time soon and because he’s finishing his residency as an emergency physician.
    “I’ve seen a lot of people die,” he said, “and it’s never like you see it on TV.”
    It’s a discussion I wish we’d had with my dad. He was always so healthy it was a shock when he suddenly contracted an irreversible disease. The only thing passing for instructions was his occasional joke: “When the time comes, just screw me in the ground.”
    So the time came, and we found ourselves in a hospital meeting room absolutely unprepared for the most excruciating decision any of us had ever made. I wanted to spare my next of kin that anguish.

  • Simply listing a bank’s percentage of deposits in the state is one way to report on banking, as an Albuquerque publication did recently. Thought and history offer another approach.
    The annual deposit report from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (https://www5.fdic.gov/sod/index.asp) motivated the listing. It shows deposits and other figures as of June 30 for the given year and appears about three months later.
    Discussions of New Mexico’s poorly performing economy suggest – but don’t prove – that banking has something to do with it. The infamous Dodd-Frank act is a standard villain. A recent FDIC report indicated that Dodd-Frank might not have been all that injurious to community banks.
    I’m not one to argue the FDIC’s numbers. However, any regulation that forces a small business (and small banks are small businesses) to hire staff or consultants to deal with it causes injury. The money to pay that staff comes from the operating margin of the business and basically means less profit.
    For banks, less profit means pulling in the risk horizon; less room exists for making a loan that might – just might – develop a problem. Overall, fewer loans get made and that, folks, constrains the community’s growth.

  • BY JULIE PACE
    AP White House Correspondent

  • BY DR. DAVID J. AYERS
    Visions and Values

  • Stick your nose into a crevice in the bark of a big old ponderosa pine. The smell of vanilla sweetens your senses. Some call it butterscotch, but the best noses say vanilla.
    How can a ponderosa, a species that taught respect for turpentine, surprise with the fragrance of vanilla? The story is absurd, until you put your nose in the bark.  
    We leap now to the Digital Age.  
    Information is often acclaimed as the sweet driver of market efficiency and the currency of efficient regulation. That is, information is a regulator of markets of its own accord. The more informed the trading, the wider the interests served by markets.    
    No doubt it costs time, and thus money, to hand over details on the quality of a product, or, say, factory emissions.
    Just as surely, the details allow more informed choices in the marketplace, which quicken the blessings of market efficiency. The very meaning of efficient market is one driven by widespread information.  
    The Information Age spreads data far and fast. Much the way that better data are key to market efficiency, we begin to see that better, faster data at less cost also make regulation more efficient.
    Looking further, supplying better and faster regulatory tools is itself a new market.

  • Oh, those inconvenient people – the mentally ill. They fill our jails, they scare their neighbors, they drive their families crazy and sometimes bankrupt, and once in awhile they kill somebody, or become involved in a disturbance in which the police kill them.
    The upcoming legislative session will probably revisit the painful issue of how to deal with mentally ill people who pose a real or potential threat.
    Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry recently spoke in support of a bill that almost made it though the session this year.
    As last amended during the 2015 regular session, Senate Bill 53, by Sen. Mary Kay Papen, D-Las Cruces, was intended to give the legal system a broader range of choices for dealing with mentally ill people who come to the system’s attention. Berry said it’s expected again in 2016.   
    The bill is similar to “Kendra’s Law,” first enacted in New York. That law resulted from an incident in which a schizophrenic man pushed a woman in front of an oncoming subway train.  It allows a judge to require a mentally ill person who meets certain criteria to undergo treatment, including medication, for up to a year.
    The title of the bill is “Assisted Outpatient Treatment.” What does that mean?  

  • Ernie Casias stood beside a clear cylinder that was tumbling sand mixed with foam. Not just any foam – engineered foam. “It’s like mixing shaving cream and sand,” he explained.
    Engineered foam and cellular concrete are just two materials used in reclamation of abandoned mines and other disturbed lands.
    Exhibitors at the annual conference of the National Association of Abandoned Mine Lands Programs, meeting last week in Santa Fe, displayed such a range of expertise and products, I wished everyone could see it because it might change the conversation about development of all kinds.
    Images of the leaking Gold King mine and other eyesores come readily to mind, but most people don’t realize how sophisticated environmental science has become. Regulations play a role, but it’s become an arena for entrepreneurs with new ideas for reclaiming a construction site, a tailings pile or a drill pad.
    Casias represents ConDeck Corp. of Albuquerque, which uses a process developed by Aerix Industries, of Colorado, to make lightweight “cellular concrete.” Imagine mixing ugly mine tailings with foamy concrete and pumping the stuff back in a mine as fill or support.

  • Technologies wander from our national laboratories and become companies employing people. But in the view of David Pesiri and his bosses at Los Alamos National Laboratories, far too few have wandered from the laboratory and, of those, far too many have escaped New Mexico.
    One wanderer, Decision Sciences International Corp. of Poway, Calif., near San Diego, was briefly mentioned by The Economist in an article headlined, “The Nuke Detectives.” The firm’s “revolutionary and disruptive technology, originally invented” by LANL physicists, scans for contraband including nuclear threats.  
    David Pesiri is changing things. Pesiri, a chemist with 21 publications under his belt, leads LANL’s Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation.
    “As a model, ‘technology transfer’ is dead,” Pesiri told the New Mexico Industrial Development Executives Association at IDEA’s September meeting in Los Alamos. The old passive sounding model had something to do with LANL getting patents and posting notices about the patents.
    Last year Pesiri wrote about the new way for Innovation magazine.

  • BY MARVIN FOLKERTSMA
    Center for Visions and Values

  • Pity the folks whose jobs require them to make sense of lunacy. The media in all their forms are overrun with it, and it is pulverizing that which passes for political discourse today.
    As last week came to a close, the Republican U.S. House Speaker John Boehner and his hard-right GOP cohorts in Congress were threatening another of their federal government shutdowns if funding for Planned Parenthood is not stripped from a stop-gap budget bill that had to be passed if a shutdown was to be avoided come Oct. 1.
    It was chaos, with widespread talk among House Republicans that Boehner’s hold on the speakership itself was hanging in the balance if the far-righters in his caucus didn’t get their way on this one.
    So Boehner just up and resigned.   
    The situation became so worrisome that New Mexico Democratic Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham dispatched a communique to her constituents reminding them that “80 percent of the women who rely on Planned Parenthood are low-income.”
    “We should be working to protect the most vulnerable amongst us, not taking away their health care,” she added.

  • Like any professional discipline, the academic arena is littered with educational jargon.
     Today, an effective teacher must exemplify intersegmental critical-thinking, recontextualize synergistic concept-maps, and benchmark technology-infused pedogogical schemas.
     Personally, I don’t mind jargon. but there is one word that seems to be more abused than any other.  Rigor.
     Educational rigor involves the creation of a focused coherent learning environment that fosters critical thinking, encourages mastery of the material, and challenges students to help them build a sense of accomplishment.
     In short, rigor raises the bar, preparing students for moving on to more advanced topics and applications.
     There is little applicable training to guide teachers how to establish and nurture rigor in the classroom. Consequently, teachers strongly disagree regarding what constitutes “rigor.”
     In math classes, “rigor” is often tossed like a didactic grenade, purposely confusing students with needlessly difficult problems. Teachers expect students to memorize long lists of complex formulas and to work out problems with large or complicated looking numbers.

  • BY MARITA NOON
    Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great, Inc.

  • Historical Museum receives outpouring of community support after theft

    By now many of your readers may know that a theft occurred at the Los Alamos Historical Museum on Sept. 25. The good news is no one was hurt and no objects were taken from the museum. However, we did have a beautifully crafted, wooden donation box – made by one of our volunteers – which was torn apart, and the cash donations inside were stolen.
    The theft received a significant amount of attention on social media over the weekend, and the response from the community, both far and near, has been tremendous. We have received donations through our website from as far away as Texas and Montana, and a number of people came into the museum on Saturday to give special donations.
    The Los Alamos Historical Museum belongs to the community. Admission is free, and we rely on donations to support our operations. The outpouring of support has been encouraging and inspiring. It reminds us, once again, why this is the best little community on the planet. We love being your museum!

    Sincerely and with gratitude,
    Heather McClenahan
    Executive Director
    Los Alamos Historical Society
     

  • WASHINGTON — The “regular guy with a big job” has seemed at the center of palace intrigue forever, a man to shake things up in the old days, to be plotted against on and off ever since.
    There was nothing regular about John Boehner’s rise and fall and rise and fall in the House, nothing constant except that tan and the smoke-filled rooms wherever he was allowed to light up.
    Boehner’s announced exit as House speaker and from Congress altogether caps a political career that began as the head of a homeowners association in an Ohio neighborhood and made him second in line to the presidency.
    A firm opponent of abortion rights, he was essentially undone by disaffection from conservatives who want to push an anti-abortion struggle over Planned Parenthood financing to the point of closing the government, a step too far for him. He was once one of the agitators – a member of the Newt Gingrich Gang of Seven who seized the Republican congressional agenda, then the reins of House power, in the 1990s. He was ultimately undone by tea partyers and other conservatives he’d kept in line as speaker for nearly five years – barely, and at a cost.

  • While papal visits to the United States are increasingly common, what is uncommon is to see political-ideological battle lines drawn around a pope. The tendency this time is especially acute among liberals, who eagerly frame Francis as one of them – a categorization Francis has resisted. “I’m sure that I haven’t said anything more than what’s written in the social doctrine of the Church,” he said as his plane approached U.S. soil.
    To some degree, liberals are certainly justified in linking Pope Francis to many of their concerns – climate change, wealth redistribution, poverty. And even many conservatives seem to concede this pope to the political left. In truth, however, both sides lack a full picture.
    To illustrate the point, I’ll focus on the subject area that brings Pope Francis here to America to begin with: a major international Catholic Church synod on family and marriage.
    Though Francis is absolutely forgiving and charitable and merciful, including to homosexuals, when it comes to marriage and family, this pope has been unflinchingly orthodox in support of historic Church teaching. Some of his language has been even stronger than his predecessors. The extent to which that is true is at times shocking. Here are just a few examples:

  • For years, New Mexicans have said we’ve got it all when it comes to energy – oil, gas, coal, geothermal, solar, wind – and now we have a new energy policy that reflects this.
    Maybe now we can end the pointless jousting between supporters of renewable and traditional sources.
    Last week, the governor announced a plan developed over the past year by the state Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department after listening to sessions held around the state. The first energy plan since 1991 embraces all sectors and emphasizes jobs, economic diversity and energy independence.
    The big shift is “promoting greater production of ALL sources of energy, especially low-carbon sources,” which the governor’s news release describes as an “‘all of the above’ approach to energy development.”
    What I especially like about the plan is its solid statements of policy backed up by proposals rather than puffery. Here are the key points:
    Building or improving pipelines, electric transmission and rail from the Four Corners to I-40, and adding a third oil refinery.

  • BY GEORGE CHANDLER
    Sheriff, Los Alamos County